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More Americans in their golden years are going hungry

More Americans in their golden years are going hungry

In a country as wealthy as the United States, it may come as a surprise that one in 12 seniors do not have access to adequate food due to lack of money or other financial resources. Continue reading

Airport security-style technology could help doctors decide on stroke treatment

Airport security-style technology could help doctors decide on stroke treatment

A new computer program could help doctors predict which patients might suffer potentially fatal side-effects from a key stroke treatment. The program, which assesses brain scans using pattern recognition software similar to that used in airport security and passport control, has been developed by researchers at Imperial College London. Results of a pilot study funded by the Wellcome Trust, which used the software are published in the journal Neuroimage Clinical Continue reading

Proposal: Managing most troubling symptoms of dementia, lessen use of drugs

Proposal: Managing most troubling symptoms of dementia, lessen use of drugs

A new approach to handling agitation, aggression and other unwanted behaviors by people with dementia may help reduce the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in this population, and make life easier for them and their caregivers, a team of experts says. Publishing their recommendations under the easy-to-remember acronym of “DICE”, the panel of specialists in senior mental health hope to spark better teamwork among those who care for dementia patients at home, in residential facilities and in hospitals and clinics Continue reading

Key milestone for brown fat research with ground-breaking MRI scan

Key milestone for brown fat research with ground-breaking MRI scan

The first MRI scan to show ‘brown fat’ in a living adult could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity. Continue reading

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity — the most “feminine” girls and the most “masculine” boys — are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. The most feminine teenage girls use tanning beds more frequently and are more likely to be physically inactive, while the most masculine teenage boys are more likely to use chewing tobacco and to smoke cigars, compared with their gender-nonconforming peers. The study, the first to look at cancer risk behaviors in teens based on their gender expression, appears online April 16, 2014 in the Journal of Adolescent Health Continue reading

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity — the most “feminine” girls and the most “masculine” boys — are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. The most feminine teenage girls use tanning beds more frequently and are more likely to be physically inactive, while the most masculine teenage boys are more likely to use chewing tobacco and to smoke cigars, compared with their gender-nonconforming peers Continue reading

Guns aren’t the only things killing cops

Guns aren’t the only things killing cops

The public does not realize — in fact, police themselves may not realize — that the dangers police officers are exposed to on a daily basis are far worse than anything on “Law and Order.” “Police officers are exposed to danger from so many different elements — many of them unexpected — that they are dying not just on the job, but for the job,” says University at Buffalo epidemiologist John Violanti, PhD, an expert on police culture, psychological stress, illness and mortality. And they are dying younger than the rest of us Continue reading

Scientists grow cartilage to reconstruct nose

Scientists grow cartilage to reconstruct nose

Scientists at the University of Basel report first ever successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in the laboratory. Continue reading

Scientists report success growing cartilage to reconstruct nostrils and implanting tissue-engineered vaginal organs into humans

Scientists report success growing cartilage to reconstruct nostrils and implanting tissue-engineered vaginal organs into humans

Two new articles published in The Lancet report the first ever successful operations in humans to reconstruct the alar wings of the nose (nostrils) (Martin et al ), and to implant tissue-engineered vaginal organs in women with a rare syndrome that causes the vagina to be underdeveloped or absent (Atala et al ), in both cases using the patients’ own tissue. In one paper, led by Professor Ivan Martin from the University of Basel in Switzerland, scientists report having engineered a human cartilage graft from patients’ own nasal septum cartilage cells to successfully rebuild the nostrils (alar lobule) of five individuals whose noses were damaged by skin cancer Continue reading

Scientists report success growing cartilage to reconstruct nostrils and implanting tissue-engineered vaginal organs into humans

Scientists report success growing cartilage to reconstruct nostrils and implanting tissue-engineered vaginal organs into humans

Two new articles published in The Lancet report the first ever successful operations in humans to reconstruct the alar wings of the nose (nostrils) (Martin et al ), and to implant tissue-engineered vaginal organs in women with a rare syndrome that causes the vagina to be underdeveloped or absent (Atala et al ), in both cases using the patients’ own tissue. In one paper, led by Professor Ivan Martin from the University of Basel in Switzerland, scientists report having engineered a human cartilage graft from patients’ own nasal septum cartilage cells to successfully rebuild the nostrils (alar lobule) of five individuals whose noses were damaged by skin cancer Continue reading