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Population screening for sudden cardiac death in young people: Feasible with basic program

Population screening for sudden cardiac death in young people: Feasible with basic program

Despite fears over cost, the wide-scale screening of young people to detect risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is feasible and cost effective, according to a study presented at EuroPRevent 2014.(1) More than 12,000 people aged between 14 and 35 were screened at a cost of £35 (40 euro) each; rates of subsequent referral for further investigation were low and considered of “a relative low additional cost” to health services. The study was reported at the EuroPRevent congress 2014 in Amsterdam by Dr Rajay Narain, Clinical Research Fellow from the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, St George’s University of London (and Cardiac Risk in the Young Heart Screening Charity), UK. As background to the study Dr Narain explained that the most publicized cases of SCD in young people occur in elite sports players and athletes. Continue reading

New knowledge about muscular dystrophy uncovered

New knowledge about muscular dystrophy uncovered

The most common form of muscular dystrophy among adults is dystrophia myotonica type 1 (DM1), where approximately 1 in every 8000 is affected by the disease. The severity of the disease varies from mild forms to severe congenital forms Continue reading

Better sleep predicts longer survival time for women with advanced breast cancer

Better sleep predicts longer survival time for women with advanced breast cancer

A new study reports that sleep efficiency, a ratio of time asleep to time spent in bed, is predictive of survival time for women with advanced breast cancer. Continue reading

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat-related injury — caused by regular car accidents, falls and burns — is the most common reason for pediatric admissions to U.S. military combat hospitals in both Iraq and Afghanistan reveals new study findings published in the May issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons . Continue reading

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat-related injury — caused by regular car accidents, falls and burns — is the most common reason for pediatric admissions to U.S. Continue reading

Engineers grow functional human cartilage in lab

Engineers grow functional human cartilage in lab

Researchers at Columbia Engineering announced today that they have successfully grown fully functional human cartilage in vitro from human stem cells derived from bone marrow tissue. Their study, which demonstrates new ways to better mimic the enormous complexity of tissue development, regeneration, and disease, is published in the April 28 Early Online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). “We’ve been able — for the first time — to generate fully functional human cartilage from mesenchymal stem cells by mimicking in vitro the developmental process of mesenchymal condensation,” says Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, who led the study and is the Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Columbia Engineering and professor of medical sciences. Continue reading

More Americans in their golden years are going hungry

More Americans in their golden years are going hungry

In a country as wealthy as the United States, it may come as a surprise that one in 12 seniors do not have access to adequate food due to lack of money or other financial resources. Continue reading

Airport security-style technology could help doctors decide on stroke treatment

Airport security-style technology could help doctors decide on stroke treatment

A new computer program could help doctors predict which patients might suffer potentially fatal side-effects from a key stroke treatment. The program, which assesses brain scans using pattern recognition software similar to that used in airport security and passport control, has been developed by researchers at Imperial College London. Results of a pilot study funded by the Wellcome Trust, which used the software are published in the journal Neuroimage Clinical Continue reading

Proposal: Managing most troubling symptoms of dementia, lessen use of drugs

Proposal: Managing most troubling symptoms of dementia, lessen use of drugs

A new approach to handling agitation, aggression and other unwanted behaviors by people with dementia may help reduce the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in this population, and make life easier for them and their caregivers, a team of experts says. Publishing their recommendations under the easy-to-remember acronym of “DICE”, the panel of specialists in senior mental health hope to spark better teamwork among those who care for dementia patients at home, in residential facilities and in hospitals and clinics Continue reading

Key milestone for brown fat research with ground-breaking MRI scan

Key milestone for brown fat research with ground-breaking MRI scan

The first MRI scan to show ‘brown fat’ in a living adult could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity. Continue reading