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Repeated sexual assault victims report more psychological problems than previously thought

Repeated sexual assault victims report more psychological problems than previously thought

According to recent studies, one in five adult women and one in 100 adult men have reported being raped. Continue reading

Functional nerve cells from skin cells

Functional nerve cells from skin cells

A new method of generating mature nerve cells from skin cells could greatly enhance understanding of neurodegenerative diseases, and could accelerate the development of new drugs and stem cell-based regenerative medicine. The nerve cells generated by this new method show the same functional characteristics as the mature cells found in the body, making them much better models for the study of age-related diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, and for the testing of new drugs. Eventually, the technique could also be used to generate mature nerve cells for transplantation into patients with a range of neurodegenerative diseases Continue reading

Research explains action of drug that may slow aging, related disease

Research explains action of drug that may slow aging, related disease

A proven approach to slow the aging process is dietary restriction, but new research in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University helps explain the action of a drug that appears to mimic that process — rapamycin. Rapamycin, an antibiotic and immunosuppressant approved for use about 15 years ago, has drawn extensive interest for its apparent ability — at least in laboratory animal tests — to emulate the ability of dietary restriction in helping animals to live both longer and healthier. However, this medication has some drawbacks, including an increase in insulin resistance that could set the stage for diabetes. Continue reading

Research explains action of drug that may slow aging, related disease

Research explains action of drug that may slow aging, related disease

A proven approach to slow the aging process is dietary restriction, but new research in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University helps explain the action of a drug that appears to mimic that process — rapamycin. Rapamycin, an antibiotic and immunosuppressant approved for use about 15 years ago, has drawn extensive interest for its apparent ability — at least in laboratory animal tests — to emulate the ability of dietary restriction in helping animals to live both longer and healthier. Continue reading

Promising new target for gum disease treatment identified

Promising new target for gum disease treatment identified

Nearly half of all adults in the United States suffer from the gum disease periodontitis, and 8.5 percent have a severe form that can raise the risk of heart disease, diabetes, arthritis and pregnancy complications. University of Pennsylvania researchers have been searching for ways to prevent, half and reverse periodontitis. In a report published in the Journal of Immunology , they describe a promising new target: a component of the immune system called complement Continue reading

Internet-mediated exercise program improves quality of life in COPD patients

Internet-mediated exercise program improves quality of life in COPD patients

A pedometer-based walking program supported by Internet-based instruction and support can improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference. “Low levels of physical activity among individuals with COPD can contribute to impaired quality of life and have been linked to higher risk of exacerbations, hospitalizations, and death. Continue reading

Intensive insulin provides survival benefit in patients with type 2 diabetes after heart attack

Intensive insulin provides survival benefit in patients with type 2 diabetes after heart attack

Long-term follow-up of the DIGAMI 1 trial — a landmark study of type 2 diabetes in Sweden — shows that intensive insulin treatment prolonged life by more than 2 years in patients with diabetes after a heart attack, compared with standard treatment for diabetes, reports Dr Viveca Ritsinger from the Unit of Cardiology of the Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden and colleagues in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology . Continue reading

Intensive insulin provides survival benefit in patients with type 2 diabetes after heart attack

Intensive insulin provides survival benefit in patients with type 2 diabetes after heart attack

Long-term follow-up of the DIGAMI 1 trial — a landmark study of type 2 diabetes in Sweden — shows that intensive insulin treatment prolonged life by more than 2 years in patients with diabetes after a heart attack, compared with standard treatment for diabetes, reports Dr Viveca Ritsinger from the Unit of Cardiology of the Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden and colleagues in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology . The trial, involving 620 patients with type 2 diabetes, began in 1990 Continue reading

Galectins direct immunity against bacteria that employ camouflage

Galectins direct immunity against bacteria that employ camouflage

Our bodies produce a family of proteins that recognize and kill bacteria whose carbohydrate coatings resemble those of our own cells too closely, scientists have discovered. Called galectins, these proteins recognize carbohydrates from a broad range of disease-causing bacteria, and could potentially be deployed as antibiotics to treat certain infections. Continue reading

Study validates air sampling techniques to fight bioterrorism

Study validates air sampling techniques to fight bioterrorism

Air and surface sampling techniques currently used by the US government are effective in fighting bioterrorism and potentially saving lives, a Saint Louis University researcher finds. Results published in Biosecurity and Bioterrorism by Alexander Garza, M.D., MPH, former chief medical officer at the Department of Homeland Security and a team of researchers from Los Alamos National Lab reviewed the data from a series of experiments simulating a bioterrorism attack against the Pentagon. Continue reading