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Tag Archives: Development

New technique maps life’s effects on our DNA: Powerful single-cell technique to study environmental effects on DNA

New technique maps life’s effects on our DNA: Powerful single-cell technique to study environmental effects on DNA

Researchers at the BBSRC-funded Babraham Institute, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Single Cell Genomics Centre, have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. Continue reading

Discovery may make it easier to develop life-saving stem cells

Discovery may make it easier to develop life-saving stem cells

Not unlike looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack, a team of Michigan State University researchers have found a gene that could be key to the development of stem cells — cells that can potentially save millions of lives by morphing into practically any cell in the body. The gene, known as ASF1A, was not discovered by the team. Continue reading

Tooth plaque provides unique insights into our prehistoric ancestors’ diet

Tooth plaque provides unique insights into our prehistoric ancestors’ diet

An international team of researchers has found new evidence that our prehistoric ancestors had a detailed understanding of plants long before the development of agriculture. By extracting chemical compounds and microfossils from dental calculus (calcified dental plaque) from ancient teeth, the researchers were able to provide an entirely new perspective on our ancestors’ diets. Continue reading

Tooth plaque provides unique insights into our prehistoric ancestors’ diet

Tooth plaque provides unique insights into our prehistoric ancestors’ diet

An international team of researchers has found new evidence that our prehistoric ancestors had a detailed understanding of plants long before the development of agriculture. By extracting chemical compounds and microfossils from dental calculus (calcified dental plaque) from ancient teeth, the researchers were able to provide an entirely new perspective on our ancestors’ diets. Continue reading

New assay to spot fake malaria drugs could save thousands of lives

New assay to spot fake malaria drugs could save thousands of lives

Chemists and students in science and engineering at Oregon State University have created a new type of chemical test, or assay, that’s inexpensive, simple, and can tell whether or not one of the primary drugs being used to treat malaria is genuine — an enormous and deadly problem in the developing world. The World Health Organization has estimated that about 200,000 lives a year may be lost due to the use of counterfeit anti-malarial drugs Continue reading

3D printed anatomy to mark a new era for medical training

3D printed anatomy to mark a new era for medical training

The creators of a unique kit containing anatomical body parts produced by 3D printing say it will revolutionize medical education and training, especially in countries where cadaver use is problematical. Continue reading

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the largest professional association of neurologists and a leading authority on sports concussion, is releasing a new position paper that states doctors have an ethical obligation to educate and protect athletes from sports concussion and clear them to play only when the athlete is medically ready, standing firm against objections from players, parents or coaches. The statement is published in the July 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the AAN, and is being released ahead of The Sports Concussion Conference, July 11-13, 2014, in Chicago, where the AAN will share the latest scientific advances in diagnosing and treating sports concussion. The AAN position statement calls for doctors to safeguard the future mental and physical health of athletes as a top priority, especially regarding return-to-play decision-making. Continue reading

Wake-up call for more research into cell metabolism

Wake-up call for more research into cell metabolism

More scientific research into the metabolism of stromal support cells and immune cells — and the role of the metabolism of these cell types in the development of diseases — could open new therapeutic avenues for diabetes, inflammatory conditions and cancer. That was the conclusion of a review article by scientists from VIB and KU Leuven in the leading journal Nature Continue reading

Huntington’s disease protein helps wire young brain

Huntington’s disease protein helps wire young brain

The protein that is mutated in Huntington’s disease is critical for wiring the brain in early life, according to a new Duke University study. Huntington’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes a wide variety of symptoms, such as uncontrolled movements, inability to focus or remember, depression and aggression. By the time these symptoms appear, usually in middle age, the disease has already ravaged the brain. Continue reading

Six cases where big data can reduce healthcare costs

Six cases where big data can reduce healthcare costs

As the use of electronic health record becomes widespread across the United States, due in large to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the quantity of clinical data that will become available for research and analytic purposes will also dramatically increase. Additionally, experts in healthcare have become increasingly focused on clinical analytics that analyze large quantities of data for the purpose of gleaning insights that have the potential to improve the value of patient care — a process that is known as big data. In a new research study published in Health Affairs on July 8, 2014, researchers highlight some of the clearest opportunities to reduce costs through the use of big data. Continue reading