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Tag Archives: Development

Scientists generate first human stomach tissue in lab with stem cells

Scientists generate first human stomach tissue in lab with stem cells

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory — creating an unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises, ranging from cancer to diabetes. Scientists at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center report Oct. 29 in Nature they used human pluripotent stem cells — which can become any cell type in the body — to grow a miniature version of the stomach Continue reading

New compounds reduce debilitating inflammation

New compounds reduce debilitating inflammation

Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation associated with diseases such as ulcerative colitis, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The compounds, dubbed OD36 and OD38, specifically appear to curtail inflammation-triggering signals from RIPK2 (serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase 2). Continue reading

New dent in HIV-1′s armor: promising target for HIV/AIDS treatment

New dent in HIV-1′s armor: promising target for HIV/AIDS treatment

Like a slumbering dragon, HIV can lay dormant in a person’s cells for years, evading medical treatments only to wake up and strike at a later time, quickly replicating itself and destroying the immune system. Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered a new protein that participates in active HIV replication, as detailed in the latest issue of Genes & Development . The new protein, called Ssu72, is part of a switch used to awaken HIV-1 (the most common type of HIV) from its slumber. Continue reading

‘Sunshine can slow weight gain’

‘Sunshine can slow weight gain’

unable to retrieve full-text contentExposure to sunshine could slow down weight gain and the development of diabetes, research on mice suggests. Continue reading

A gut bacterium that attacks dengue and malaria pathogens and their mosquito vectors

A gut bacterium that attacks dengue and malaria pathogens and their mosquito vectors

Just like those of humans, insect guts are full of microbes, and the microbiota can influence the insect’s ability to transmit diseases. A study published on October 23rd in PLOS Pathogens reports that a bacterium isolated from the gut of an Aedes mosquito can reduce infection of mosquitoes by malaria parasites and dengue virus Continue reading

A gut bacterium that attacks dengue and malaria pathogens and their mosquito vectors

A gut bacterium that attacks dengue and malaria pathogens and their mosquito vectors

Just like those of humans, insect guts are full of microbes, and the microbiota can influence the insect’s ability to transmit diseases. A study published on October 23rd in PLOS Pathogens reports that a bacterium isolated from the gut of an Aedes mosquito can reduce infection of mosquitoes by malaria parasites and dengue virus Continue reading

Cancer exosome ‘micro factories’ aid in cancer progression

Cancer exosome ‘micro factories’ aid in cancer progression

Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA (miRNA) molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer. Continue reading

Treatment for osteoporosis, bone cancer, employed for the first time in dental filling procedures

Treatment for osteoporosis, bone cancer, employed for the first time in dental filling procedures

Journal of Dental Research publishes a paper directed by Salvatore Sauro, Professor at University CEU Cardenal Herrera in Spain, in collaboration with international researchers from Finland, Brazil, United States and United Kingdom. The research report has demonstrated how the use of zoledronic acid, in combination with bioactive ion-releasing resin-based restorative materials used as dental adhesive, reduces the degradation of dentin collagen and promotes remineralisation at the resin-dentine interface. Continue reading

Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Mutations in the body’s cells randomly accumulate as part of the aging process, and most are harmless Continue reading

Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified

Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified

Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate — conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy — and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene. Continue reading