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Tag Archives: Development

How smells stick to your memories: Your nose can be a pathfinder

How smells stick to your memories: Your nose can be a pathfinder

Waves in your brain make smells stick to your memories and inner maps: When I was a child I used to sit in my grandfather’s workshop, playing with wood shavings. Continue reading

Sperm meets egg: Protein essential for fertilization discovered

Sperm meets egg: Protein essential for fertilization discovered

Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered interacting proteins on the surface of the sperm and the egg essential to begin mammalian life. Continue reading

Rare disease of the inner ear: New insights

Rare disease of the inner ear: New insights

A new study has shed light on the factors likely to lead to the development of a rare condition affecting the inner ear. Continue reading

Rare disease of the inner ear: New insights

Rare disease of the inner ear: New insights

A new study has shed light on the factors likely to lead to the development of a rare condition affecting the inner ear. In the most comprehensive study of Ménière’s Disease to date, researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School have been able to suggest what goes wrong in the body when people develop the disease, and provide an insight into factors that lead to its development. Ménière’s Disease can cause tinnitus, hearing loss, vertigo attacks and a feeling of pressure deep within the ear Continue reading

Intelligent prosthetic liners could ease pain for lower limb amputees

Intelligent prosthetic liners could ease pain for lower limb amputees

A new device could help to relieve the pain and discomfort experienced by thousands of amputees as a result of poorly fitting replacement lower limbs. Researchers are developing a prototype of the world’s first prosthetic ‘intelligent’ liner with integrated pressure sensors, which could be available to NHS patients in as little as three years. The sensors for the device, invented by Dr Liudi Jiang and an interdisciplinary team at the University of Southampton, measure the pressure and pulling forces at the interface between a patient’s stump and socket of their prosthesis. Continue reading

Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment. Continue reading

Everest trek shows how some people get type II diabetes

Everest trek shows how some people get type II diabetes

Scientists have gained new insights into the molecular process of how some people get type II diabetes, which could lead to new ways of preventing people from getting the condition. The research, led by the University of Southampton and UCL, which took place on Mount Everest, assessed the mechanisms by which low oxygen levels in the body — known as hypoxia — are associated with the development of insulin resistance. Continue reading

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

A UK studyi investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease’s severity. The research, conducted by the King’s College Hospital Paediatric Liver Centre and the University of Surrey’s School of Biosciences and Medicine, and funded by the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation retrospectively analysed the medical records of 120 paediatric patients with NAFLD. The findings could carry significant implications for UK clinicians in light of the nation’s rising number of childhood NAFLD cases. Continue reading

Fecal transplant? Gut microbiota may play a role in development of alcoholic liver disease

Fecal transplant? Gut microbiota may play a role in development of alcoholic liver disease

Exciting new data presented today at the International Liver Congress™ 2014 shows that the gut microbiota has a potential role in the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Though an early stage animal model, the French study highlights the possibility of preventing ALD with fecal microbiota transplantation — the engrafting of new microbiota, usually through administering human fecal material from a healthy donor into the colon of a recipient. In the study, two groups of germ-free mice received gut microbiota transplants from human representatives; one set from a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis, the other from a patient with a history of alcohol abuse but without alcoholic hepatitis. Continue reading

Guns aren’t the only things killing cops

Guns aren’t the only things killing cops

The public does not realize — in fact, police themselves may not realize — that the dangers police officers are exposed to on a daily basis are far worse than anything on “Law and Order.” “Police officers are exposed to danger from so many different elements — many of them unexpected — that they are dying not just on the job, but for the job,” says University at Buffalo epidemiologist John Violanti, PhD, an expert on police culture, psychological stress, illness and mortality. And they are dying younger than the rest of us Continue reading