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Tag Archives: Development

Treatment for osteoporosis, bone cancer, employed for the first time in dental filling procedures

Treatment for osteoporosis, bone cancer, employed for the first time in dental filling procedures

Journal of Dental Research publishes a paper directed by Salvatore Sauro, Professor at University CEU Cardenal Herrera in Spain, in collaboration with international researchers from Finland, Brazil, United States and United Kingdom. The research report has demonstrated how the use of zoledronic acid, in combination with bioactive ion-releasing resin-based restorative materials used as dental adhesive, reduces the degradation of dentin collagen and promotes remineralisation at the resin-dentine interface. Continue reading

Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Mutations in the body’s cells randomly accumulate as part of the aging process, and most are harmless Continue reading

Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified

Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified

Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate — conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy — and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene. Continue reading

Children’s genes affect their mothers’ risk of rheumatoid arthritis

Children’s genes affect their mothers’ risk of rheumatoid arthritis

A child’s genetic makeup may contribute to his or her mother’s risk of rheumatoid arthritis, possibly explaining why women are at higher risk of developing the disease than men. This research will be presented October 21, at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego. Rheumatoid arthritis, a painful inflammatory condition that primarily affects the joints, has been tied to a variety of genetic and environmental factors, including lifestyle factors and previous infections. Continue reading

New mechanism that can lead to blindness discovered

New mechanism that can lead to blindness discovered

An important scientific breakthrough by a team of IRCM researchers led by Michel Cayouette, PhD, is being published by The Journal of Neuroscience . The Montréal scientists discovered that a protein found in the retina plays an essential role in the function and survival of light-sensing cells that are required for vision. These findings could have a significant impact on our understanding of retinal degenerative diseases that cause blindness Continue reading

Transforming safety net practices into patient-centered medical homes: Progress report

Transforming safety net practices into patient-centered medical homes: Progress report

A recently concluded demonstration project made meaningful progress toward introducing a “patient-centered medical home” approach at “safety net” practices serving vulnerable and underserved populations. Lessons learned in the course of developing and implementing the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative (SNMHI) are featured in a special November supplement to Medical Care . The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Continue reading

Defective gene renders diarrhea vaccine ineffective

Defective gene renders diarrhea vaccine ineffective

Acute diarrheal illnesses cause nearly one-fifth of all child deaths in developing countries. The most common cause is rotavirus. Continue reading

Moderate levels of ‘free radicals’ found beneficial to healing wounds

Moderate levels of ‘free radicals’ found beneficial to healing wounds

Long assumed to be destructive to tissues and cells, “free radicals” generated by the cell’s mitochondria — the energy producing structures in the cell — are actually beneficial to healing wounds. That’s the conclusion of biologists at UC San Diego who discovered that “reactive oxygen species” — chemically reactive molecules containing oxygen, such as peroxides, commonly referred to as free radicals — are necessary for the proper healing of skin wounds in the laboratory roundworm C. elegans. Continue reading

Moderate levels of ‘free radicals’ found beneficial to healing wounds

Moderate levels of ‘free radicals’ found beneficial to healing wounds

Long assumed to be destructive to tissues and cells, “free radicals” generated by the cell’s mitochondria — the energy producing structures in the cell — are actually beneficial to healing wounds. That’s the conclusion of biologists at UC San Diego who discovered that “reactive oxygen species” — chemically reactive molecules containing oxygen, such as peroxides, commonly referred to as free radicals — are necessary for the proper healing of skin wounds in the laboratory roundworm C. elegans. Continue reading

Antibiotic resistance: Bacterial defense policies

Antibiotic resistance: Bacterial defense policies

High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy has now revealed in unprecedented detail the structural changes in the bacterial ribosome which results in resistance to the antibiotic erythromycin. Multiresistant bacterial pathogens that are insensitive to virtually all available antibiotics are one of the major public-health challenges of our time Continue reading