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Tag Archives: Development

Indoor mold poses health risk to asthma sufferers

Indoor mold poses health risk to asthma sufferers

Damp and mould in homes could pose a significant health risk to people with asthma according to a new study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. By critically reviewing the findings from 17 studies in eight different countries, the research has found that the presence of several types of mould can lead to breathing problems in asthma sufferers, as well as increasing the likelihood of developing the condition. The research has been conducted by a team at the University of Exeter Medical School and is the first time all of the information relating to mould and asthma has been gathered and analysed together. Continue reading

Glucose meter of a different color provides continuous monitoring

Glucose meter of a different color provides continuous monitoring

University of Illinois engineers are bringing a touch of color to glucose monitoring. The researchers developed a new continuous glucose monitoring material that changes color as glucose levels fluctuate, and the wavelength shift is so precise that doctors and patients may be able to use it for automatic insulin dosing — something not possible using current point measurements like test strips Continue reading

New biomarker highly promising for predicting breast cancer outcomes

New biomarker highly promising for predicting breast cancer outcomes

A protein named p66ShcA shows promise as a biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses, according to research published ahead of print in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology . Continue reading

Simply complex: The origin of our body axes

Simply complex: The origin of our body axes

The fresh-water polyp Hydra, a member of the over 600-million-year-old phylum Cnidaria, is famous for its virtually unlimited regenerative capability and hence a perfect model for molecular stem cell and regeneration research. This polyp, with its simple structure and radial symmetry, can help us understand how our body axes came to evolve Continue reading

Epigenetic changes in children with Crohn’s disease seen in study

Epigenetic changes in children with Crohn’s disease seen in study

A new study finds a wide range of epigenetic changes — alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures — in children with Crohn’s disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , official journal of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Continue reading

The marmoset animal model recapitulates disease symptoms of MERS infection in humans

The marmoset animal model recapitulates disease symptoms of MERS infection in humans

An article published on August 21st in PLOS Pathogens reports the first animal model that recapitulates the severe and sometimes lethal respiratory symptoms seen in human patients and suggests that the common marmoset will play an important role in the development effective countermeasures against Middle East respiratory syndrome corona virus. Recent studies had identified how the MERS-CoV recognizes and invades human cells: its spike protein binds to DPP4, a protein on the surface of human cells, and this leads to internalization of the virus which then takes over the human cell and turns it into a virus factory. Continue reading

How cellular guardians of the intestine develop

How cellular guardians of the intestine develop

Even the most careful chosen meal can contain surprises. To defend against infectious microbes, viruses or other potential hazards that find their way to the intestines, a dedicated contingent of immune cells keeps watch within the thin layer of tissue that divides the contents of the gut from the body itself Continue reading

Maturing brain flips function of amygdala in regulating stress hormones

Maturing brain flips function of amygdala in regulating stress hormones

In contrast to evidence that the amygdala stimulates stress responses in adults, researchers at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have found that the amygdala has an inhibitory effect on stress hormones during the early development of nonhuman primates. The results are published this week in Journal of Neuroscience . The amygdala is a region of the brain known to be important for responses to threatening situations and learning about threats Continue reading

Space station inspired robot to help heal sick children

Space station inspired robot to help heal sick children

Children love robots. In all shapes, sizes, “personalities” and “smarts,” these electronic wonders have been found under Christmas trees by kids and unwrapped on birthdays for years. The gift of space-inspired robotics now goes beyond toys Continue reading

Taking a stand: Balancing the benefits, risks of physical activity in children

Taking a stand: Balancing the benefits, risks of physical activity in children

Today the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology took a stand on the promotion of childhood physical activity and published their position and recommendations in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism (APNM). This position stand provides an important overview of knowledge in the area of risk of physical activity for children and suggests both practical guidelines and a research agenda. Uniquely, this position stand addresses both benefits and risks of physical activity for children Continue reading