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Tag Archives: Diseases

Growing up on livestock farm halves risk of inflammatory bowel diseases

Growing up on livestock farm halves risk of inflammatory bowel diseases

New research conducted at Aarhus University has revealed that people who have grown up on a farm with livestock are only half as likely as their urban counterparts to develop the most common inflammatory bowel diseases: ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Continue reading

New discovery in living cell signaling

New discovery in living cell signaling

A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy. An international collaboration of researchers, led by scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley, have unlocked the secret behind the activation of the Ras family of proteins, one of the most important components of cellular signaling networks in biology and major drivers of cancers that are among the most difficult to treat Continue reading

Noroviruses cause around a fifth of all cases of acute gastroenteritis worldwide

Noroviruses cause around a fifth of all cases of acute gastroenteritis worldwide

Noroviruses are a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (diarrhea and vomiting) across all age groups, responsible for almost a fifth (18%) of all cases worldwide. New estimates, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases , highlight the importance of developing norovirus vaccines, say the authors. “Including data from 48 countries and involving more than 187,000 gastroenteritis cases worldwide, these new estimates are the largest analysis of norovirus infection and disease to date Continue reading

Neurons get their neighbors to take out their trash

Neurons get their neighbors to take out their trash

Biologists have long considered cells to function like self-cleaning ovens, chewing up and recycling their own worn out parts as needed. But a new study challenges that basic principle, showing that some nerve cells found in the eye pass off their old energy-producing factories to neighboring support cells to be “eaten.” The find, which may bear on the roots of glaucoma, also has implications for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other diseases that involve a buildup of “garbage” in brain cells Continue reading

Neurons get their neighbors to take out their trash

Neurons get their neighbors to take out their trash

Biologists have long considered cells to function like self-cleaning ovens, chewing up and recycling their own worn out parts as needed. But a new study challenges that basic principle, showing that some nerve cells found in the eye pass off their old energy-producing factories to neighboring support cells to be “eaten.” The find, which may bear on the roots of glaucoma, also has implications for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other diseases that involve a buildup of “garbage” in brain cells. Continue reading

Higher health care cost burden of musculoskeletal conditions compared to other diseases

Higher health care cost burden of musculoskeletal conditions compared to other diseases

A new study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) highlights the increased health care costs associated with musculoskeletal conditions compared to other diseases. Health care costs were almost 50% higher for people with a musculoskeletal condition compared to any other singly occurring condition. This disparity remained high where two conditions co-existed, with health care costs still one third higher (36%) for those people with one of their two conditions musculoskeletal in nature, highlighting the significant impact of these diseases. Continue reading

Rising tobacco epidemic in Asia linked to elevated risk of death

Rising tobacco epidemic in Asia linked to elevated risk of death

A new study estimates that tobacco smoking has been linked to approximately 2 million deaths among adult men and women in Asia in recent years and predicts a rising death toll. The study, published in PLOS Medicine , was led by Wei Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., MPH, professor of Medicine and director of the Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and John Potter, M.D., Ph.D., a member and scientific advisor of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. Roughly 60 percent of the world’s population lives in Asia where approximately half of men are tobacco smokers Continue reading

Deadly diseases overlooked for too long, scientists say

Deadly diseases overlooked for too long, scientists say

Decades of neglect have allowed infectious diseases to devastate the lives of thousands of people in the developing world, a study reveals. Continue reading

Green tea could reduce pancreatic cancer risk: Study explains how

Green tea could reduce pancreatic cancer risk: Study explains how

Green tea and its extracts have been widely touted as potential treatments for cancer, as well as several other diseases. But scientists have struggled to explain how the green tea and its extracts may work to reduce the risk of cancer or to slow the growth of cancer cells. Continue reading

Green tea could reduce pancreatic cancer risk: Study explains how

Green tea could reduce pancreatic cancer risk: Study explains how

Green tea and its extracts have been widely touted as potential treatments for cancer, as well as several other diseases. But scientists have struggled to explain how the green tea and its extracts may work to reduce the risk of cancer or to slow the growth of cancer cells. Continue reading