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Tag Archives: Diseases

Recalculating costs of combination vaccines

Recalculating costs of combination vaccines

One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive option, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers. “The choice of vaccines to administer can be driven by numerous factors,” says Sheldon H Continue reading

HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children: More research needed

HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children: More research needed

Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. In a paper in The Lancet Infectious Diseases LSTM’s Professor Russell Stothard, working with colleagues in the department of Parasitology and researchers from Cape Western Reserve University, in Cleveland Ohio, University of Cambridge and the Royal Veterinary College looked at previous research into the joint burden of HIV/AIDS and schistosomiasis of children, and found that while disease-specific control interventions are continuing, potential synergies in the control efforts for the two diseases have not been investigated. Continue reading

Rare bone diseases and their dental, oral, craniofacial manifestations

Rare bone diseases and their dental, oral, craniofacial manifestations

The International and American Associations for Dental Research (IADR/AADR) have published a paper titled “Rare Bone Diseases and Their Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Manifestations.” The complete review by researchers Sunday O. Akintoye, Andrea B Continue reading

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

A UK studyi investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease’s severity. The research, conducted by the King’s College Hospital Paediatric Liver Centre and the University of Surrey’s School of Biosciences and Medicine, and funded by the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation retrospectively analysed the medical records of 120 paediatric patients with NAFLD. The findings could carry significant implications for UK clinicians in light of the nation’s rising number of childhood NAFLD cases. Continue reading

Similarities between HIV/AIDS, opioid addiction epidemics

Similarities between HIV/AIDS, opioid addiction epidemics

There are important parallels between the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the current epidemic of opioid addiction — ones that could trigger a significant shift in opioid addiction prevention, diagnosis and treatment. These are the findings of a comparative review of HIV/AIDS and addiction by researchers Josiah D. Rich, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights, based at The Miriam Hospital; Traci C. Continue reading

Rising awareness may explain spike in Autism diagnoses

Rising awareness may explain spike in Autism diagnoses

Young boys continue to have the highest rate of autism diagnoses, but Danish doctors are diagnosing more girls, teenagers and adults with the disorder than they did in the mid-1990s. That’s the finding from a 16-year study published 20 February in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders . Many studies look at the prevalence of autism, akin to taking a snapshot of the number of diagnoses in a given population. Continue reading

Advance toward developing an oral pain reliever derived from debilitating snail venom

Advance toward developing an oral pain reliever derived from debilitating snail venom

Scientists have reported they have created at least five new experimental substances — based on a tiny protein found in cone snail venom — that could someday lead to the development of safe and effective oral medications for treatment of chronic nerve pain. They say the substances could potentially be stronger than morphine, with fewer side effects and lower risk of abuse. “This is an important incremental step that could serve as the blueprint for the development of a whole new class of drugs capable of relieving one of the most severe forms of chronic pain that is currently very difficult to treat,” said David Craik, Ph.D., who led the study Continue reading

Transition to ICD-10 may cause information, financial losses for providers

Transition to ICD-10 may cause information, financial losses for providers

Health providers may experience information and financial loss during the mandated conversion from the current International Classification of Diseases to its new and improved version, report researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The study, appearing in the March issue of the Journal of Oncology Practice , looked at coding ambiguity for hematology-oncology diagnoses to anticipate challenges all providers may face during the transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM. The researchers chose to look at hematology-oncology because prior research suggested that, compared to other sub-specialties, it would have a simpler transition, due to fewer ICD-10 codes and less convoluted mappings Continue reading

Using Twitter to track the flu: Researchers find a better way to screen the tweets

Using Twitter to track the flu: Researchers find a better way to screen the tweets

Jan. Continue reading

Molecular switch enabling immune cells to better fight disease

Molecular switch enabling immune cells to better fight disease

Jan. 20, 2013 — A research team led by the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology has discovered the mechanism that enables CD4 helper T cells to assume the more aggressive role of killer T cells in mounting an immune attack against viruses, cancerous tumors and other damaged or infected cells Continue reading