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Tag Archives: dna

First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast cancer protein. Continue reading

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel consisting of short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA. These carbon nanotube “porins” have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications. Continue reading

Prostate cancer, kidney disease detected in urine samples on the spot

Prostate cancer, kidney disease detected in urine samples on the spot

When you flush the toilet, you may be discarding microscopic warning signs about your health. But a cunningly simple new device can stop that vital information from “going to waste.” Brigham Young University chemist Adam Woolley and his students made a device that can detect markers of kidney disease and prostate cancer in a few minutes. Continue reading

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase immunohistochemistry testing comparable to, if not better than, fluorescence in situ hybridization testing

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase immunohistochemistry testing comparable to, if not better than, fluorescence in situ hybridization testing

Sixteen institutions across Europe collaborated together to show for the first time that a semi-quantitative anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) protein expression test, immunohistochemistry (IHC), is reliable amongst several laboratories and reviewers when test methodology and result interpretation are strictly standardized and the scoring pathologists are appropriately trained on the test. ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) shrink tumors and increase progression-free survival in late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients positive for ALK as determined by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test, a test for DNA rearrangement within the gene. Continue reading

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase immunohistochemistry testing comparable to, if not better than, fluorescence in situ hybridization testing

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase immunohistochemistry testing comparable to, if not better than, fluorescence in situ hybridization testing

Sixteen institutions across Europe collaborated together to show for the first time that a semi-quantitative anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) protein expression test, immunohistochemistry (IHC), is reliable amongst several laboratories and reviewers when test methodology and result interpretation are strictly standardized and the scoring pathologists are appropriately trained on the test. ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) shrink tumors and increase progression-free survival in late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients positive for ALK as determined by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test, a test for DNA rearrangement within the gene. Continue reading

Cancer exosome ‘micro factories’ aid in cancer progression

Cancer exosome ‘micro factories’ aid in cancer progression

Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA (miRNA) molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer. Continue reading

YEATS protein potential therapeutic target for cancer

YEATS protein potential therapeutic target for cancer

Federal Express® and UPS® are no match for the human body when it comes to distribution. Continue reading

Fast modeling of cancer mutations

Fast modeling of cancer mutations

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming process. MIT researchers have now developed a new way to model the effects of these genetic mutations in mice Continue reading

Genome editing technique advanced by researchers

Genome editing technique advanced by researchers

Customized genome editing — the ability to edit desired DNA sequences to add, delete, activate or suppress specific genes — has major potential for application in medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture. Now, in a paper published in Molecular Cell , North Carolina State University researchers and colleagues examine six key molecular elements that help drive this genome editing system, which is known as CRISPR-Cas. NC State’s Dr. Continue reading

Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Mutations in the body’s cells randomly accumulate as part of the aging process, and most are harmless Continue reading