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Tag Archives: dna

How epigenetic memory is passed through generations: Sperm and eggs transmit memory of gene repression to embryos

How epigenetic memory is passed through generations: Sperm and eggs transmit memory of gene repression to embryos

A growing body of evidence suggests that environmental stresses can cause changes in gene expression that are transmitted from parents to their offspring, making “epigenetics” a hot topic. Epigenetic modifications do not affect the DNA sequence of genes, but change how the DNA is packaged and how genes are expressed. Continue reading

First blood test to diagnose depression in adults

First blood test to diagnose depression in adults

The first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults has been developed by Northwestern Medicine® scientists, a breakthrough approach that provides the first objective, scientific diagnosis for depression. The test identifies depression by measuring the levels of nine RNA blood markers. RNA molecules are the messengers that interpret the DNA genetic code and carry out its instructions. Continue reading

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island recently published the results of an investigation into how we might better tailor therapy for ovarian cancer. The work comes out of the molecular therapeutic laboratory directed by Richard G. Moore, MD, of Women & Infants’ Program in Women’s Oncology. Continue reading

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island recently published the results of an investigation into how we might better tailor therapy for ovarian cancer. Continue reading

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Potential link between assisted reproduction, autism: No link found

Potential link between assisted reproduction, autism: No link found

When prospective parents have trouble conceiving and decide to seek medical help, they typically experience more than a little anxiety and have a host of questions: What are the potential risks to the mother and the baby? What kinds of diseases or other problems are associated with assisted reproduction? And, is one of those problems autism Continue reading

Molecular mechanisms of birth defects among older women: Why older women can have babies with Down Syndrome

Molecular mechanisms of birth defects among older women: Why older women can have babies with Down Syndrome

Dartmouth researchers studying cell division in fruit flies have discovered a pathway that may improve understanding of molecular mistakes that cause older women to have babies with Down syndrome. The study shows for the first time that new protein linkages occur in immature egg cells after DNA replication and that these replacement linkages are essential for these cells to maintain meiotic cohesion for long periods. The study appears in the journal PLOS Genetics Continue reading

Molecular mechanisms of birth defects among older women: Why older women can have babies with Down Syndrome

Molecular mechanisms of birth defects among older women: Why older women can have babies with Down Syndrome

Dartmouth researchers studying cell division in fruit flies have discovered a pathway that may improve understanding of molecular mistakes that cause older women to have babies with Down syndrome. The study shows for the first time that new protein linkages occur in immature egg cells after DNA replication and that these replacement linkages are essential for these cells to maintain meiotic cohesion for long periods Continue reading

Cells put off protein production during times of stress

Cells put off protein production during times of stress

Living cells are like miniature factories, responsible for the production of more than 25,000 different proteins with very specific 3-D shapes. And just as an overwhelmed assembly line can begin making mistakes, a stressed cell can end up producing misshapen proteins that are unfolded or misfolded. Now Duke University researchers in North Carolina and Singapore have shown that the cell recognizes the buildup of these misfolded proteins and responds by reshuffling its workload, much like a stressed out employee might temporarily move papers from an overflowing inbox into a junk drawer. Continue reading