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Tag Archives: dna

Diabetes susceptibility gene regulates health of cell’s powerhouse, study finds

Diabetes susceptibility gene regulates health of cell’s powerhouse, study finds

A team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that a susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes regulates self-destruction of the cell’s energy factory. Continue reading

Gut bacteria predict survival after stem cell transplant, study shows

Gut bacteria predict survival after stem cell transplant, study shows

New research, published online in Blood , the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, suggests that the diversity of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of patients receiving stem cell transplants may be an important predictor of their post-transplant survival. A healthy gastrointestinal tract contains a balanced community of microorganisms (known as microbiota), largely comprised of “friendly” bacteria that aid digestion and are important to immune system function Continue reading

Gene ‘switch’ reverses cancer in common childhood leukemia

Gene ‘switch’ reverses cancer in common childhood leukemia

Melbourne researchers have shown a type of leukemia can be successfully ‘reversed’ by coaxing the cancer cells back into normal development. The discovery was made using a model of B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), the most common cancer affecting children. Continue reading

Fecal transplants restore healthy bacteria and gut functions

Fecal transplants restore healthy bacteria and gut functions

Fecal microbiota transplantation — the process of delivering stool bacteria from a healthy donor to a patient suffering from intestinal infection with the bacterium Clostridium difficile — works by restoring healthy bacteria and functioning to the recipient’s gut, according to a study published this week in mBio ®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Continue reading

Towards new cancer therapies

Towards new cancer therapies

In 2012, about 8.2 million people died of cancer making the disease a major cause of death worldwide. Continue reading

‘Onion’ vesicles for drug delivery developed

‘Onion’ vesicles for drug delivery developed

One of the defining features of cells is their membranes. Continue reading

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes wiped out in lab with genetic method that creates male-only offspring

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes wiped out in lab with genetic method that creates male-only offspring

Scientists have modified mosquitoes to produce sperm that will only create males, pioneering a fresh approach to eradicating malaria. In a study published in the journal Nature Communications , scientists from Imperial College London have tested a new genetic method that distorts the sex ratio of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, the main transmitters of the malaria parasite, so that the female mosquitoes that bite and pass the disease to humans are no longer produced. Continue reading

Herpesviruses undercover: How the virus goes undetected by body’s immune system

Herpesviruses undercover: How the virus goes undetected by body’s immune system

Pathogens entering our body only remain unnoticed for a short period. Within minutes our immune cells detect the invader and trigger an immune response. However, some viruses have developed strategies to avoid detection and elimination by our immune system Continue reading

Herpesviruses undercover: How the virus goes undetected by body’s immune system

Herpesviruses undercover: How the virus goes undetected by body’s immune system

Pathogens entering our body only remain unnoticed for a short period. Within minutes our immune cells detect the invader and trigger an immune response. However, some viruses have developed strategies to avoid detection and elimination by our immune system Continue reading

Mitochondrial DNA of first Near Eastern farmers is sequenced for the first time

Mitochondrial DNA of first Near Eastern farmers is sequenced for the first time

The mitochondrial DNA of the first Near Eastern farmers has been sequenced for the first time. In the research, published in the journal PLOS Genetics , experts analysed samples from three sites located in the birthplace of Neolithic agricultural practices: the Middle Euphrates basin and the oasis of Damascus, located in today’s Syria and date at about 8,000 BC. The paper is signed by Daniel Turbón and Alejandro Pérez Pérez, from the Department of Animal Biology of the University of Barcelona (UB); Eva Fernández, from Liverpool John Moores University; Cristina Gamba, Eduardo Arroyo Pardo and Pedro Cuesta, from Complutense University of Madrid; Eva Prats, from the Spanish National Research Council, and Josep Anfruns and Miquel Molist, from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). Continue reading