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Tag Archives: dna

Epigenetic changes in children with Crohn’s disease seen in study

Epigenetic changes in children with Crohn’s disease seen in study

A new study finds a wide range of epigenetic changes — alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures — in children with Crohn’s disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , official journal of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Continue reading

Genetic key to lupus shows potential of personalized medicine

Genetic key to lupus shows potential of personalized medicine

Medical researchers have used DNA sequencing to identify a gene variant responsible for causing lupus in a young patient. The development shows that for the first time, it is feasible for researchers to identify the individual causes of lupus in patients by using DNA sequencing, allowing doctors to target specific treatments to individual patients. Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects one in 700 Australians, predominantly young and middle aged women. Continue reading

More than just X and Y: a new genetic basis for sex determination

More than just X and Y: a new genetic basis for sex determination

Men and women differ in plenty of obvious ways, and scientists have long known that genetic differences buried deep within our DNA underlie these distinctions. In the past, most research has focused on understanding how the genes that encode proteins act as sex determinants Continue reading

New technology offers insight into cholesterol

New technology offers insight into cholesterol

With new advanced techniques developed by the Copenhagen Center for Glycomics at the University of Copenhagen it is possible to study cells in greater detail than ever before. The findings have just been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and may, in the long term, improve the treatment of high cholesterol. Researchers from the Copenhagen Center for Glycomics at the University of Copenhagen have studied an important receptor protein called LDLR using new, groundbreaking techniques Continue reading

New technology offers insight into cholesterol

New technology offers insight into cholesterol

With new advanced techniques developed by the Copenhagen Center for Glycomics at the University of Copenhagen it is possible to study cells in greater detail than ever before. The findings have just been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and may, in the long term, improve the treatment of high cholesterol Continue reading

New insights into survival, transmission strategy of malaria parasites

New insights into survival, transmission strategy of malaria parasites

HP1 proteins are found in most eukaryotic organisms and are important regulators of gene silencing. Continue reading

Our ancestor’s ‘leaky’ membrane answers big questions in biology

Our ancestor’s ‘leaky’ membrane answers big questions in biology

All life on Earth came from one common ancestor — a single-celled organism — but what it looked like, how it lived and how it evolved into today’s modern cells is a four billion year old mystery being solved by researchers at UCL using mathematical modelling. Findings published in PLOS Biology suggest for the first time that life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) had a ‘leaky’ membrane, which helps scientists answer two of biology’s biggest questions: 1. Continue reading

Native bacteria block Wolbachia from being passed to mosquito progeny

Native bacteria block Wolbachia from being passed to mosquito progeny

Native bacteria living inside mosquitoes prevent the insects from passing Wolbachia bacteria — which can make the mosquitoes resistant to the malaria parasite — to their offspring, according to a team of researchers. The team found that Asaia , a type of bacteria that occurs naturally in Anopheles mosquitoes, blocks invasion of Wolbachia into the mosquitoes’ germlines — the cells that are passed on through successive generations of an organism — thus stopping the insects from transmitting Wolbachia to their offspring. ” Wolbachia infects up to 70 percent of all known insect species, but is notably absent from some groups, including the Anopheles mosquitoes that transmit malaria,” said Jason Rasgon, associate professor of entomology, Penn State. Continue reading

Preemies’ gut bacteria may depend more on gestational age than environment

Preemies’ gut bacteria may depend more on gestational age than environment

Scientists believe babies are born with digestive systems containing few or no bacteria. Their guts then quickly become colonized by microbes — good and bad — as they nurse or take bottles, receive medication and even as they are passed from one adoring relative to another. However, in infants born prematurely, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Continue reading

Editing HPV’s genes to kill cervical cancer cells

Editing HPV’s genes to kill cervical cancer cells

Researchers have hijacked a defense system normally used by bacteria to fend off viral infections and redirected it against the human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical, head and neck, and other cancers. Using the genome editing tool known as CRISPR, the Duke University researchers were able to selectively destroy two viral genes responsible for the growth and survival of cervical carcinoma cells, causing the cancer cells to self-destruct. The findings, appearing online August 7 in the Journal of Virology , give credence to an approach only recently attempted in mammalian cells, and could pave the way toward antiviral strategies targeted against other DNA-based viruses like hepatitis B and herpes simplex. Continue reading