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Tag Archives: Education

Does becoming a doctor pay off for women?

Does becoming a doctor pay off for women?

ScienceDaily (July 12, 2012) — Women who go to medical school just for the financial rewards of being a doctor could be making a mistake, according to a study published in the Journal of Human Capital . Continue reading

Does becoming a doctor pay off for women?

Does becoming a doctor pay off for women?

ScienceDaily (July 12, 2012) — Women who go to medical school just for the financial rewards of being a doctor could be making a mistake, according to a study published in the Journal of Human Capital . The research found that after factoring in the high upfront costs of becoming a doctor, most women primary-care doctors would have made more money over their careers becoming physician assistants instead. For the median man on the other hand, becoming a doctor pays a substantial premium over becoming a PA. Continue reading

Uncontrollable anger prevalent among U.S. youth: Almost two-thirds have history of anger attacks

Uncontrollable anger prevalent among U.S. youth: Almost two-thirds have history of anger attacks

ScienceDaily (July 2, 2012) — Nearly two-thirds of U.S. adolescents have experienced an anger attack that involved threatening violence, destroying property or engaging in violence toward others at some point in their lives. Continue reading

Day dreaming good for you?  Reflection is critical for development and well-being

Day dreaming good for you? Reflection is critical for development and well-being

ScienceDaily (July 2, 2012) — As each day passes, the pace of life seems to accelerate — demands on productivity continue ever upward and there is hardly ever a moment when we aren’t, in some way, in touch with our family, friends, or coworkers. While moments for reflection may be hard to come by, a new article suggests that the long-lost art of introspection — even daydreaming — may be an increasingly valuable part of life. In the article, published in the July issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, psychological scientist Mary Helen Immordino-Yang and colleagues survey the existing scientific literature from neuroscience and psychological science, exploring what it means when our brains are ‘at rest.’ In recent years, researchers have explored the idea of rest by looking at the so-called ‘default mode’ network of the brain, a network that is noticeably active when we are resting and focused inward. Continue reading

Actress aids dementia awareness

Actress aids dementia awareness

21 May 2012 Last updated at 01:08 ET By Adam Brimelow Health Correspondent, BBC News Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play. Carey Mulligan tells the BBC’s Adam Brimelow about her grandmother’s Alzheimer’s A poll has suggested more than four out of 10 people know – or have known – someone with dementia. Continue reading

Not all ‘good cholesterol’ is ‘good’: Raising HDL not a sure route to countering heart disease

Not all ‘good cholesterol’ is ‘good’: Raising HDL not a sure route to countering heart disease

ScienceDaily (May 16, 2012) — A new paper published online in The Lancet challenges the assumption that raising a person’s HDL — the so-called “good cholesterol” — will necessarily lower the risk of a heart attack. The new research underscores the value of using genetic approaches to test biological hypotheses about human disease prior to developing specific drugs. Continue reading

Chronic disease: NHS ‘can’t cope’

Chronic disease: NHS ‘can’t cope’

9 May 2012 Last updated at 21:30 ET The health system in the UK cannot cope with the rising number of under-65s with long-term medical conditions and needs “radical change”, says a study in The Lancet. A team of researchers analysing 1.75 million people in Scotland found that nearly a quarter had two or more chronic diseases. Their care was often co-ordinated poorly and inefficient, the study said. Continue reading

Gerard backs cooking class call

Gerard backs cooking class call

5 May 2012 Last updated at 21:05 ET Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver and England footballer Steven Gerrard are calling on the government to fight obesity through cookery teaching in schools. They have joined figures in health and education as signatories to letter to the prime minister suggesting changes be made to the national curriculum. Continue reading

Students more likely to be fit when physical education is mandatory

Students more likely to be fit when physical education is mandatory

ScienceDaily (May 4, 2012) — Fifth graders in California public school districts that comply with the state’s mandatory physical education requirement are more likely to have better fitness levels than students in districts that don’t comply, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine . “Even though California has a physical education law and monitors its compliance, our study revealed that many school districts are not providing the required physical education and too many children go to school in districts that do not comply with physical education laws,” said Emma V. Continue reading

After epic debate, avian flu research sees light of day

After epic debate, avian flu research sees light of day

ScienceDaily (May 2, 2012) — After a marathon debate over a pair of studies that show how the avian H5N1 influenza virus could become transmissible in mammals, and an unprecedented recommendation by a government review panel to block publication, one of the studies was finally and fully published May 3, 2012 in the journal Nature . Publication caps an epic public conversation that pitted some infectious diseases experts against flu and public health researchers who argued that publication was not only important, but also essential to informing influenza surveillance and preparedness for a virus that could evolve to infect humans and cause a global pandemic. “Our study shows that relatively few amino acid mutations are sufficient for a virus with an avian H5 hemagglutinin to acquire the ability to transmit in mammals,” says Yoshihiro Kawaoka, a University of Wisconsin-Madison flu researcher whose study of H5N1 virus transmissibility was at the center of the debate Continue reading