List/Grid

Tag Archives: Energy

Wake-up call for more research into cell metabolism

Wake-up call for more research into cell metabolism

More scientific research into the metabolism of stromal support cells and immune cells — and the role of the metabolism of these cell types in the development of diseases — could open new therapeutic avenues for diabetes, inflammatory conditions and cancer. That was the conclusion of a review article by scientists from VIB and KU Leuven in the leading journal Nature Continue reading

Nanoparticles used to enhance chemotherapy

Nanoparticles used to enhance chemotherapy

University of Georgia researchers have developed a new formulation of cisplatin, a common chemotherapy drug, that significantly increases the drug’s ability to target and destroy cancerous cells. Continue reading

New discovery in living cell signaling

New discovery in living cell signaling

A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy. An international collaboration of researchers, led by scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley, have unlocked the secret behind the activation of the Ras family of proteins, one of the most important components of cellular signaling networks in biology and major drivers of cancers that are among the most difficult to treat Continue reading

Long jumpers do better with a spring in their step

Long jumpers do better with a spring in their step

Long jumpers and triple jumpers spend hours training to perfect their take-off. But what influences their performance? Continue reading

Diabetes susceptibility gene regulates health of cell’s powerhouse, study finds

Diabetes susceptibility gene regulates health of cell’s powerhouse, study finds

A team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that a susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes regulates self-destruction of the cell’s energy factory. Continue reading

Heart physicians devise new hybrid robotic and stenting procedure

Heart physicians devise new hybrid robotic and stenting procedure

Tony Parris has worked for banks and electronics companies and has even driven an 18-wheel truck 995 miles a day for more than nine years as part of his working career. The 57-year-old Anniston native finally went into business for himself when he opened his own hardware store in Alexandria in 2010. Parris says he has worked six to seven days a week and 14- to 16-hour days for 40 years Continue reading

Compact proton therapy for fight against cancer

Compact proton therapy for fight against cancer

The future face of modern-day anti-cancer therapy based on charged particles like protons could potentially involve using laser accelerators. However, these facilities will need to be reduced in terms of both size and cost compared to conventional ones Continue reading

Details of calcium ‘safety-valve’ in cells explained

Details of calcium ‘safety-valve’ in cells explained

Sometimes a cell has to die — when it’s done with its job or inflicted with injury that could otherwise harm an organism. Conversely, cells that refuse to die when expected can lead to cancer. So scientists interested in fighting cancer have been keenly interested in learning the details of “programmed cell death.” They want to understand what happens when this process goes awry and identify new targets for anticancer drugs. Continue reading

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Certain bonds connecting biological cells get stronger when they’re tugged. Those bonds could help keep hearts together and pumping; breakdowns of those bonds could help cancer cells break away and spread. Those bonds are known as catch bonds and they’re formed by common adhesion proteins called cadherins. Continue reading

Why are older women more vulnerable to breast cancer? New clues

Why are older women more vulnerable to breast cancer? New clues

Scientists from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have gained more insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer. They found that as women age, the cells responsible for maintaining healthy breast tissue stop responding to their immediate surroundings, including mechanical cues that should prompt them to suppress nearby tumors. Their work sheds light on how aging alters cellular and molecular functions, and how these changes contribute to the prevalence of breast cancer in older women Continue reading