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Tag Archives: Financial

Major geographic disparities in access to kidney transplantation

Major geographic disparities in access to kidney transplantation

There is substantial geographic variation in access to kidney transplantation among the more than 4000 US dialysis facilities that treat patients with kidney failure, with a disproportionate lack of access to those in the Southeast. Certain factors, which are described in several papers published in the American Journal of Transplantation , seem to explain these differences, and they underscore the need for political, financial, and health systems changes to reduce transplant inequities across the country Continue reading

Added value of local food hubs

Added value of local food hubs

As the largest purchaser of wholesale produce in Santa Barbara County, UC Santa Barbara’s residential dining services provided the perfect avenue for a pilot project incorporating local pesticide-free or certified organic produce into an institutional setting. Continue reading

Cardiovascular diseases rise during Greek financial crisis

Cardiovascular diseases rise during Greek financial crisis

Hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases increased during the Greek financial crisis, according to two studies from Athens. The research was presented today at the Heart Failure Congress 2014, held 17-20 May in Athens, Greece. The Congress is the main annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology. Continue reading

Cardiovascular diseases rise during Greek financial crisis

Cardiovascular diseases rise during Greek financial crisis

Hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases increased during the Greek financial crisis, according to two studies from Athens. The research was presented today at the Heart Failure Congress 2014, held 17-20 May in Athens, Greece. The Congress is the main annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology. Continue reading

One in 10 16-year-olds have considered self-harm, study shows

One in 10 16-year-olds have considered self-harm, study shows

One in ten 16-year-olds surveyed in a new study by Queen’s University and the University of Ulster have considered self-harm or taking an overdose. The results of the annual Young Life and Times (YLT) survey, which are published today during Mental Health Awareness Week, also found that almost a third of 16-year-olds questioned had experienced serious personal, emotional or mental health problems at some point in the past year. 1,367 16-year-olds across Northern Ireland took part in the 2013 survey undertaken by ARK, a joint initiative by Queen’s University and the University of Ulster. Continue reading

Repeated preschool wheeze may set stage for long-term damage in lung function

Repeated preschool wheeze may set stage for long-term damage in lung function

Children who wheeze are at risk of developing damage that will affect their lung function by the age of 6 years, according to researchers at CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital and the University of Montreal. These appear to be persistent, even if asthma symptoms seem to disappear at least temporarily by school age in several cases. Continue reading

Blacks with financial worries have lower health scores

Blacks with financial worries have lower health scores

Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate their health more poorly, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior . While lower income and education among minorities have been linked to poor health for decades, this study focused just on the connection between financial worries and poor health. “Because the study was cross-sectional, we cannot say that one caused the other, but we know that financial strain is associated with poorer self-rated health among black adults,” said the study’s lead author Lorraine R. Continue reading

Blacks with financial worries have lower health scores

Blacks with financial worries have lower health scores

Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate their health more poorly, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior . While lower income and education among minorities have been linked to poor health for decades, this study focused just on the connection between financial worries and poor health. “Because the study was cross-sectional, we cannot say that one caused the other, but we know that financial strain is associated with poorer self-rated health among black adults,” said the study’s lead author Lorraine R. Continue reading

Young athletes from higher income families more likely to suffer serious overuse injuries

Young athletes from higher income families more likely to suffer serious overuse injuries

A Loyola University Medical Center study is reporting for the first time a link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status. The rate of serious overuse injuries in athletes who come from families that can afford private insurance is 68 percent higher than the rate in lower-income athletes who are on public insurance (Medicaid), the study found Continue reading

Tissue testing during breast cancer lumpectomies prevents need for reoperation 96 percent of time

Tissue testing during breast cancer lumpectomies prevents need for reoperation 96 percent of time

Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while patient are still on the operating table. Continue reading