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Tag Archives: Genetics

Noninvasive brain control: New light-sensitive protein enables simpler, more powerful optogenetics

Noninvasive brain control: New light-sensitive protein enables simpler, more powerful optogenetics

Optogenetics, a technology that allows scientists to control brain activity by shining light on neurons, relies on light-sensitive proteins that can suppress or stimulate electrical signals within cells. This technique requires a light source to be implanted in the brain, where it can reach the cells to be controlled Continue reading

Potential Alzheimer’s drug prevents abnormal blood clots in brain

Potential Alzheimer’s drug prevents abnormal blood clots in brain

Without a steady supply of blood, neurons can’t work. Continue reading

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. Continue reading

Genetic code for diabetes in Greenland broken by scientists

Genetic code for diabetes in Greenland broken by scientists

A spectacular piece of detective work has mapped a special gene variant among Greenlanders which plays a particularly important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. The results have been published in Nature and can be used to improve prevention and treatment options for those genetically at-risk. In collaboration with Greenland researchers from Steno Diabetes Center and University of Southern Denmark, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have carried out the ground-breaking genetic analysis based on blood samples from 5,000 people or approximately 10% of the modestly-sized population inhabiting an area larger than western Europe Continue reading

Race a factor in mortality in heart attack patients on anti-clotting drug

Race a factor in mortality in heart attack patients on anti-clotting drug

Researchers have identified the first genetic variations linked to race that begin to explain a higher risk of death among some African American and Caucasian patients taking the anti-clotting drug clopidogrel (Plavix) after a heart attack. These variants increased patients’ risk of dying in the year following a first heart attack, but they appeared to do so for different reasons depending on race, according to a study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis Continue reading

Race a factor in mortality in heart attack patients on anti-clotting drug

Race a factor in mortality in heart attack patients on anti-clotting drug

Researchers have identified the first genetic variations linked to race that begin to explain a higher risk of death among some African American and Caucasian patients taking the anti-clotting drug clopidogrel (Plavix) after a heart attack. These variants increased patients’ risk of dying in the year following a first heart attack, but they appeared to do so for different reasons depending on race, according to a study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis Continue reading

Gene differences in yellow fever, malaria mosquitoes mapped

Gene differences in yellow fever, malaria mosquitoes mapped

Virginia Tech entomologists have developed a chromosome map for about half of the genome of the mosquito Aedes agypti, the major carrier of dengue fever and yellow fever. With the map, researchers can compare the chromosome organization and evolution between this mosquito and the major carrier of malaria, the Anopheles gambiae mosquito, to find ways to prevent diseases. Continue reading

Could ‘fragile Y hypothesis’ explain chromosome loss?

Could ‘fragile Y hypothesis’ explain chromosome loss?

A UT Arlington research team says their study of genetic information from more than 4,000 beetle species has yielded a new theory about why some species lose their Y chromosome and others, such as humans, hang on to it. They call it the “fragile Y hypothesis.” The biologists’ idea is that the fate of the Y chromosome is heavily influenced by how meiosis, or the production of sperm, works in an organism Continue reading

Cellular signalling for kidney regeneration discovered

Cellular signalling for kidney regeneration discovered

Doctors and scientists have for years been astonished to observe patients with kidney disease experiencing renal regeneration. The kidney, unlike its neighbor the liver, was universally understood to be a static organ once it had fully developed. Continue reading

Effective drugs for Parkinson’s reduce symptoms of Rett syndrome in mice

Effective drugs for Parkinson’s reduce symptoms of Rett syndrome in mice

IDIBELL researchers, led by the director of the Program for Epigenetics and Cancer Biology, ICREA researcher and Professor of Genetics at the University of Barcelona, ​​Manel Esteller, have shown that a combination of effective drugs for Parkinson’s disease in mice that are used as a model of human Rett syndrome reduces some of the symptoms associated with this disease. The results of the study are published in the journal Neuropsycopharmacology . Second leading cause of mental retardation in females Rett syndrome is the second most common cause of mental retardation in women, after Down syndrome. Continue reading