List/Grid

Tag Archives: Health

Competition keeps health-care costs low, U.S. researchers find

Competition keeps health-care costs low, U.S. researchers find

Medical practices in less competitive health-care markets charge more for services, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the National Bureau of Economic Research. The study, based on U.S Continue reading

Competition keeps health-care costs low, U.S. researchers find

Competition keeps health-care costs low, U.S. researchers find

Medical practices in less competitive health-care markets charge more for services, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the National Bureau of Economic Research. The study, based on U.S Continue reading

Bogus recycling bins help identify drinking patterns among low-income seniors

Bogus recycling bins help identify drinking patterns among low-income seniors

Substance abuse is the fastest growing health concern for older adults, a segment of the population that is likewise rapidly increasing. Continue reading

Overweight women lose in the labor market, study finds

Overweight women lose in the labor market, study finds

Overweight women are more likely to work in lower-paying and more physically demanding jobs; less likely to get higher-wage positions that include interaction with the public; and make less money in either case compared to average size women and all men, according to a new Vanderbilt study. Continue reading

Overweight women lose in the labor market, study finds

Overweight women lose in the labor market, study finds

Overweight women are more likely to work in lower-paying and more physically demanding jobs; less likely to get higher-wage positions that include interaction with the public; and make less money in either case compared to average size women and all men, according to a new Vanderbilt study. “Starting when a woman becomes overweight, she is increasingly less likely to work in a personal interaction or personal communication occupation Continue reading

How troubled marriage, depression history promote obesity

How troubled marriage, depression history promote obesity

The double-whammy of marital hostility and a history of depression can increase the risk for obesity in adults by altering how the body processes high-fat foods, according to new research. In the study, men and women with a history of depression whose arguments with spouses were especially heated showed several potential metabolic problems after eating a high-fat meal. They burned fewer calories and had higher levels of insulin and spikes of triglycerides — a form of fat in the blood — after eating a heavy meal when compared to participants without these risk factors. Continue reading

NHS drafts in extra A&E doctors

NHS drafts in extra A&E doctors

unable to retrieve full-text contentThe NHS is recruiting about 260 extra doctors in an effort to ease pressure on accident and emergency units in England, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt says. Continue reading

Salmonella-infected mice that were given antibiotics became superspreaders

Salmonella-infected mice that were given antibiotics became superspreaders

Salmonella-infected mice that were given antibiotics became sicker and began shedding far more bacteria in their feces than they had before. Some people infected with pathogens spread their germs to others while remaining symptom-free themselves. Now, investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine believe they may know why Continue reading

Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests

Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests

A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they’ve learned before, may boost later learning. Continue reading

See-through sensors open new window into the brain

See-through sensors open new window into the brain

Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers’ efforts to understand the brain. The team described its technology, which has applications in fields ranging from neuroscience to cardiac care and even contact lenses, in the Oct. 20 issue of the online journal Nature Communications Continue reading