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Tag Archives: Health

Boomers building muscle at the gym — but where’s the passion

Boomers building muscle at the gym — but where’s the passion

As the first generation to embrace exercise, baby boomers continue going to the gym, yet more out of necessity than for the challenge and enjoyment of physical activity. In a study recently published in the International Journal of Wellbeing , James Gavin, a professor in Concordia’s Department of Applied Human Sciences, investigates our motivations for exercise, from looking good to having fun. Continue reading

Boomers building muscle at the gym — but where’s the passion

Boomers building muscle at the gym — but where’s the passion

As the first generation to embrace exercise, baby boomers continue going to the gym, yet more out of necessity than for the challenge and enjoyment of physical activity. In a study recently published in the International Journal of Wellbeing , James Gavin, a professor in Concordia’s Department of Applied Human Sciences, investigates our motivations for exercise, from looking good to having fun. Continue reading

A campaign involving Muslim clerics has increased uptake of polio vaccination in Nigeria

A campaign involving Muslim clerics has increased uptake of polio vaccination in Nigeria

A coalition campaign involving imams, Islamic school teachers, traditional rulers, doctors, journalists, and polio survivors is gradually turning the tide against polio vaccine rejection in northern Nigeria, according to experts from Nigeria writing in this week’s PLOS Medicine . Sani-Gwarzo Nasir (from the Federal Ministry of Health in Nigeria) and colleagues describe how anti-polio propaganda, misconceptions, and violence against vaccinators present huge challenges to polio eradication in Nigeria but perhaps most profound is the rejection of vaccination by Muslim clerics Continue reading

Monthly preventative treatment with a new drug combination reduces malaria in children

Monthly preventative treatment with a new drug combination reduces malaria in children

Preventative treatment with a monthly dose of a newer antimalarial drug can reduce the risk of malarial infection among young children, according to a study published in this week’s PLOS Medicine . The study, conducted by Victor Bigira and colleagues at San Francisco General Hospital and the Makerere University College of Health Sciences in Kampala, Uganda, finds that treating young children with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) decreased their risk of contracting malaria. Continue reading

Eating more dietary pulses can increase fullness, may help manage weight

Eating more dietary pulses can increase fullness, may help manage weight

Eating about one serving a day of beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils can increase fullness, which may lead to better weight management and weight loss, a new study has found. Continue reading

Home-based primary care lowers medicare costs for high-risk elders, data shows

Home-based primary care lowers medicare costs for high-risk elders, data shows

MedStar Washington Hospital Center geriatricians found that when medical care for frail elders with advanced illness shifts to the home, total Medicare costs were reduced by 17 percent during a two-year period. Continue reading

Home-based primary care lowers medicare costs for high-risk elders, data shows

Home-based primary care lowers medicare costs for high-risk elders, data shows

MedStar Washington Hospital Center geriatricians found that when medical care for frail elders with advanced illness shifts to the home, total Medicare costs were reduced by 17 percent during a two-year period. A new study published in the Journal of American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) underscores the value of home-based primary care for America’s aging seniors Continue reading

Obesity paradox in survival from sepsis

Obesity paradox in survival from sepsis

University of Michigan Health System researchers revealed an obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis. In a study of 1,404 Medicare beneficiaries, heavier patients were more likely to survive sepsis, a life-threatening infection that can lead to a stay in a hospital’s intensive care unit Continue reading

Obesity paradox in survival from sepsis

Obesity paradox in survival from sepsis

University of Michigan Health System researchers revealed an obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis. In a study of 1,404 Medicare beneficiaries, heavier patients were more likely to survive sepsis, a life-threatening infection that can lead to a stay in a hospital’s intensive care unit. Continue reading

Eating baked, broiled fish weekly boosts brain health, study says

Eating baked, broiled fish weekly boosts brain health, study says

Eating baked or broiled fish once a week is good for the brain, regardless of how much omega-3 fatty acid it contains, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, published online recently in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine , add to growing evidence that lifestyle factors contribute to brain health later in life. Scientists estimate that more than 80 million people will have dementia by 2040, which could become a substantial burden to families and drive up health care costs, noted senior investigator James T Continue reading