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Tag Archives: Journal

First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast cancer protein. Continue reading

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel consisting of short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA. These carbon nanotube “porins” have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications. Continue reading

Drinking milk ‘may not protect bones’

Drinking milk ‘may not protect bones’

unable to retrieve full-text contentDrinking large amounts of milk may not lower the risk of bone fractures, a study in the British Medical Journal suggests. Continue reading

Governments should take active lead to create healthy food environments to prevent cardiovascular disease

Governments should take active lead to create healthy food environments to prevent cardiovascular disease

Canadian health organizations are calling upon governments to take a leadership role in creating healthy food environments. They say that implementing strategies that facilitate access to affordable healthy foods and beverages in places where Canadians work, live, and play could play a key role in preventing diet-related disease and health risk such as obesity and hypertension, and ultimately improve cardiovascular health. This call for action is published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology Continue reading

Improving breast cancer chemo by testing patient’s tumors in a dish

Improving breast cancer chemo by testing patient’s tumors in a dish

One of the tragic realities of cancer is that the drugs used to treat it are highly toxic and their effectiveness varies unpredictably from patient to patient. However, a new “tumor-in-a-dish” technology is poised to change this reality by rapidly assessing how effective specific anti-cancer cocktails will be on an individual’s cancer before chemotherapy begins. A team of biomedical engineers at Vanderbilt University headed by Assistant Professor Melissa Skala has developed the technique, which uses fluorescence imaging to monitor the response of three-dimensional chunks of tumors removed from patients and exposed to different anti-cancer drugs. Continue reading

Breathe easier: Get your vitamin D

Breathe easier: Get your vitamin D

Asthma, which inflames and narrows the airways, has become more common in recent years. Continue reading

Ciliopathies: New insights into development

Ciliopathies: New insights into development

To date, it is still not clear how proteins regulate planar cell polarity (PCP) or the positioning of the basal body (BB) and cilia. Continue reading

Prostate cancer, kidney disease detected in urine samples on the spot

Prostate cancer, kidney disease detected in urine samples on the spot

When you flush the toilet, you may be discarding microscopic warning signs about your health. But a cunningly simple new device can stop that vital information from “going to waste.” Brigham Young University chemist Adam Woolley and his students made a device that can detect markers of kidney disease and prostate cancer in a few minutes. Continue reading

Team discovers how microbes build a powerful antibiotic

Team discovers how microbes build a powerful antibiotic

Researchers report in the journal Nature that they have made a breakthrough in understanding how a powerful antibiotic agent is made in nature. Their discovery solves a decades-old mystery, and opens up new avenues of research into thousands of similar molecules, many of which are likely to be medically useful Continue reading