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Tag Archives: Journal

Scientists learn more about rare skin cancer that killed Bob Marley

Scientists learn more about rare skin cancer that killed Bob Marley

Acral melanomas, the rare type of skin cancer that caused musician Bob Marley’s death, are genetically distinct from other types of skin cancer. Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered that acral melanomas — the rare type of skin cancer that caused reggae musician Bob Marley’s death — are genetically distinct from other more common types of skin cancer, according to a study published in the journal Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research Continue reading

Taking a stand: Balancing the benefits, risks of physical activity in children

Taking a stand: Balancing the benefits, risks of physical activity in children

Today the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology took a stand on the promotion of childhood physical activity and published their position and recommendations in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism (APNM). This position stand provides an important overview of knowledge in the area of risk of physical activity for children and suggests both practical guidelines and a research agenda. Uniquely, this position stand addresses both benefits and risks of physical activity for children Continue reading

Taking pulse of aging of the brain

Taking pulse of aging of the brain

Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technique that can noninvasively image the pulse pressure and elasticity of the arteries of the brain, revealing correlations between arterial health and aging. Brain artery support, which makes up the cerebrovascular system, is crucial for healthy brain aging and preventing diseases like Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. Continue reading

Pigs’ hearts transplanted into baboon hosts remain viable more than a year

Pigs’ hearts transplanted into baboon hosts remain viable more than a year

Investigators from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have successfully transplanted hearts from genetically engineered piglets into baboons’ abdomens and had the hearts survive for more than one year, twice as long as previously reported. This was achieved by using genetically engineered porcine donors and a more focused immunosuppression regimen in the baboon recipients, according to a study published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery , an official publication of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Cardiac transplantation is the treatment of choice for end stage heart failure. Continue reading

Advances in preterm birth

Advances in preterm birth

The Aug. 15 edition of the journal Science features a major article about the most important problem in obstetrics: preterm labor. The article, “Preterm labor: one syndrome, many causes,” delivers a powerful message: preterm birth is not one condition, but many, and provides a framework for meeting this challenge. Continue reading

New ways to treat solid tumors using protein

New ways to treat solid tumors using protein

An international team of scientists has shown that an antibody against the protein EphA3, found in the micro-environment of solid cancers, has anti-tumor effects. As EphA3 is present in normal organs only during embryonic development but is expressed in blood cancers and in solid tumors, this antibody-based approach may be a suitable candidate treatment for solid tumors. The researchers from Monash University and Ludwig Cancer Research, in Australia, and KaloBios Pharmaceuticals, in the US, have had their findings published in the journal Cancer Research . Continue reading

Previous pulmonary disease linked to increased lung cancer risk in large study

Previous pulmonary disease linked to increased lung cancer risk in large study

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals. “Associations between various respiratory diseases and lung cancer have been shown in earlier studies, but few of these studies considered multiple respiratory diseases simultaneously,” said researcher Ann Olsson, PhD, of the International Agency for Research in Cancer in Lyon, France. “In our pooled analysis of seven case-control studies involving more than 12,500 cases and 14,900 controls, we found associations between lung cancer and chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and pneumonia, with a greater increased lung cancer risk among subjects with all three of these conditions.” The findings were published in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine Continue reading

Previous pulmonary disease linked to increased lung cancer risk in large study

Previous pulmonary disease linked to increased lung cancer risk in large study

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals. “Associations between various respiratory diseases and lung cancer have been shown in earlier studies, but few of these studies considered multiple respiratory diseases simultaneously,” said researcher Ann Olsson, PhD, of the International Agency for Research in Cancer in Lyon, France Continue reading

New technology offers insight into cholesterol

New technology offers insight into cholesterol

With new advanced techniques developed by the Copenhagen Center for Glycomics at the University of Copenhagen it is possible to study cells in greater detail than ever before. The findings have just been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and may, in the long term, improve the treatment of high cholesterol Continue reading

Tissue development ‘roadmap’ created to guide stem cell medicine

Tissue development ‘roadmap’ created to guide stem cell medicine

In a boon to stem cell research and regenerative medicine, scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Boston University have created a computer algorithm called CellNet as a “roadmap” for cell and tissue engineering, to ensure that cells engineered in the lab have the same favorable properties as cells in our own bodies. Continue reading