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Tag Archives: Journal

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. A study in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology , the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), found that healthcare workers’ adherence to hand hygiene is better when other workers are nearby. “Social network effects, or peer effects, have been associated with smoking, obesity, happiness and worker productivity Continue reading

‘Electronic skin’ could improve early breast cancer detection

‘Electronic skin’ could improve early breast cancer detection

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an “electronic skin” that “feels” and images small lumps that fingers can miss. Knowing the size and shape of a lump could allow for earlier identification of breast cancer, which could save lives. Continue reading

Economic study confirms growth in autism

Economic study confirms growth in autism

The number of autism cases has soared over the past three decades, leading some to wonder if mental health professionals might be overdiagnosing the disorder. Two economists who used market theory to study the trend in autism growth, however, have confirmed that at least part of the increase is real. Continue reading

Prediabetes increases the risk of cancer by 15 percent, study of almost 900,000 people shows

Prediabetes increases the risk of cancer by 15 percent, study of almost 900,000 people shows

A meta-analysis comprising 16 studies and 891,426 participants from various regions of the world shows that prediabetes increases the risk of cancer by 15%, with differing risks depending on the type of cancer. The study, published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) is by Professor Yuli Huang, The First People’s Hospital of Shunde, Daliang Town, Shunde District, China, and colleagues Continue reading

In one of nature’s innovations, a single cell smashes and rebuilds its own genome

In one of nature’s innovations, a single cell smashes and rebuilds its own genome

Life can be so intricate and novel that even a single cell can pack a few surprises, according to a study led by Princeton University researchers. The pond-dwelling, single-celled organism Oxytricha trifallax has the remarkable ability to break its own DNA into nearly a quarter-million pieces and rapidly reassemble those pieces when it’s time to mate, the researchers report in the journal Cell. Continue reading

Brain damage caused by severe sleep apnea is reversible

Brain damage caused by severe sleep apnea is reversible

A neuroimaging study is the first to show that white matter damage caused by severe obstructive sleep apnea can be reversed by continuous positive airway pressure therapy. The results underscore the importance of the “Stop the Snore” campaign of the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project, a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Sleep Research Society and other partners. Results show that participants with severe, untreated sleep apnea had a significant reduction in white matter fiber integrity in multiple brain areas. Continue reading

Too many kids with asthma, food allergies lack school emergency plans

Too many kids with asthma, food allergies lack school emergency plans

Only one in four students with asthma and half of children with food allergies have emergency health management plans in place at school, leaving schools inadequately prepared to manage daily needs and handle medical emergencies related to often life-threatening medical conditions, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study in partnership with Chicago Public Schools (CPS). “Given the amount of time kids spend in school, it’s critical for school staff, clinicians and parents to make sure there’s a health management plan in place for students with health conditions,” said Northwestern Medicine pediatrician Ruchi Gupta, M.D., lead author of the study. “Not having a health management plan leaves students without a vital safety net during the school day. Continue reading

Declines in central line infections, ventilator pneumonias, American study shows

Declines in central line infections, ventilator pneumonias, American study shows

Hospitals across the country have seen sharp declines in rates of central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) and ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) among critically ill neonates and children, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics . Continue reading

Banked blood grows stiffer with age, study finds

Banked blood grows stiffer with age, study finds

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body, says a new study from University of Illinois researchers. Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membrane surrounding red blood cells over time Continue reading

Poor health habits linked to financial insecurity

Poor health habits linked to financial insecurity

Financial hardship, or feeling that one can’t make ends meet, may be more predictive of health risk behaviors than actual income levels for people with low-incomes, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Health Promotion . It’s well known that “the poorer you are, the less healthy you’re likely to be,” said lead author Amy Harley, Ph.D., MPH, associate professor of community and behavioral health promotion at the Zilber School of Public Health at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Continue reading