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Tag Archives: Journal

Positive memories of exercise spur future workouts

Positive memories of exercise spur future workouts

Getting motivated to exercise can be a challenge, but new research from the University of New Hampshire shows that simply remembering a positive memory about exercise may be just what it takes to get on the treadmill. This is the first study to explore how positive memories can influence future workouts. Continue reading

Tension triggers muscle building

Tension triggers muscle building

Skeletal muscles are built from small contractile units, the sarcomeres. Many of these sarcomeres are connected in a well-ordered series to form myofibrils that span from one muscle end to the other. Continue reading

Tension triggers muscle building

Tension triggers muscle building

Skeletal muscles are built from small contractile units, the sarcomeres. Many of these sarcomeres are connected in a well-ordered series to form myofibrils that span from one muscle end to the other. Continue reading

Bone lengthening technique proves useful in patients with cleft palate

Bone lengthening technique proves useful in patients with cleft palate

A technique called distraction osteogenesis can create increased length of the upper jaw in patients with cleft lip and palate deformities, reports a study in the March issue of The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, edited by Mutaz B. Habal, MD, published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Continue reading

Bone lengthening technique proves useful in patients with cleft palate

Bone lengthening technique proves useful in patients with cleft palate

A technique called distraction osteogenesis can create increased length of the upper jaw in patients with cleft lip and palate deformities, reports a study in the March issue of The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, edited by Mutaz B. Habal, MD, published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Continue reading

Older adults: Build muscle and you’ll live longer

Older adults: Build muscle and you’ll live longer

New UCLA research suggests that the more muscle mass older Americans have, the less likely they are to die prematurely. The findings add to the growing evidence that overall body composition — and not the widely used body mass index, or BMI — is a better predictor of all-cause mortality. Continue reading

Patients with schizophrenia have impaired ability to imitate, brain mapping confirms

Patients with schizophrenia have impaired ability to imitate, brain mapping confirms

According to George Bernard Shaw, “Imitation is not just the sincerest form of flattery — it’s the sincerest form of learning.” According to psychologists, imitation is something that we all do whenever we learn a new skill, whether it is dancing or how to behave in specific social situations. Now, the results of a brain-mapping experiment conducted by a team of neuroscientists at Vanderbilt University strengthen the theory that an impaired ability to imitate may underlie the profound and enduring difficulty with social interactions that characterize schizophrenia. In a paper published online on Mar Continue reading

Education, culture affect children’s understanding of human body

Education, culture affect children’s understanding of human body

Experiences of life and death can help children’s understanding of the human body and its function, according to research by psychologists at the University of East Anglia (UEA). The study found that children as young as four and five can understand that the human body works to keep us alive Continue reading

Negative effects of joining a gang last long after gang membership ends

Negative effects of joining a gang last long after gang membership ends

Imagine two children, both with the exact same risk factors for joining a gang. As teenagers, one joins a gang, the other doesn’t. Even though the first teen eventually leaves the gang, years later he or she is not only at significantly higher risk of being incarcerated and receiving illegal income, but is also less likely to have finished high school and more likely to be in poor health, receiving government assistance or struggling with drug abuse. Continue reading

Gene family that suppresses prostate cancer discovered

Gene family that suppresses prostate cancer discovered

Cornell researchers report they have discovered direct genetic evidence that a family of genes, called MicroRNA-34 (miR-34), are bona fide tumor suppressors. Continue reading