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Gene behind highly prevalent facial anomaly found

Gene behind highly prevalent facial anomaly found

Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a genetic cause of a facial disorder known as hemifacial microsomia (HFM). The researchers find that duplication of the gene OTX2 induces HFM, the second-most common facial anomaly after cleft lip and palate Continue reading

Gene behind highly prevalent facial anomaly found

Gene behind highly prevalent facial anomaly found

Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a genetic cause of a facial disorder known as hemifacial microsomia (HFM). The researchers find that duplication of the gene OTX2 induces HFM, the second-most common facial anomaly after cleft lip and palate. HFM affects approximately one in 3,500 births. Continue reading

Study validates air sampling techniques to fight bioterrorism

Study validates air sampling techniques to fight bioterrorism

Air and surface sampling techniques currently used by the US government are effective in fighting bioterrorism and potentially saving lives, a Saint Louis University researcher finds. Results published in Biosecurity and Bioterrorism by Alexander Garza, M.D., MPH, former chief medical officer at the Department of Homeland Security and a team of researchers from Los Alamos National Lab reviewed the data from a series of experiments simulating a bioterrorism attack against the Pentagon. Continue reading

Tracking the Source of ‘Selective Attention’ Problems in Brain-Injured Vets

Tracking the Source of ‘Selective Attention’ Problems in Brain-Injured Vets

An estimated 15-20 percent of U.S. troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from some form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained during their deployment, with most injuries caused by blast waves from exploded military ordnance. The obvious cognitive symptoms of minor TBI — including learning and memory problems — can dissipate within just a few days. Continue reading

Ending the perfect storm: Protein key to beating flu pandemics

Ending the perfect storm: Protein key to beating flu pandemics

A protein called SOCS4 has been shown to act as a handbrake on the immune system’s runaway reaction to flu infection, providing a possible means of minimising the impact of flu pandemics. Scientists from Melbourne’s Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have found that without SOCS4 the immune response to influenza infection is slowed and there is a vast increase in the number of damaging inflammatory molecules in the lungs. This flood of inflammatory molecules, known as a ‘cytokine storm’, is thought to contribute to flu-related deaths in humans Continue reading

Ending the perfect storm: Protein key to beating flu pandemics

Ending the perfect storm: Protein key to beating flu pandemics

A protein called SOCS4 has been shown to act as a handbrake on the immune system’s runaway reaction to flu infection, providing a possible means of minimising the impact of flu pandemics. Scientists from Melbourne’s Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have found that without SOCS4 the immune response to influenza infection is slowed and there is a vast increase in the number of damaging inflammatory molecules in the lungs. This flood of inflammatory molecules, known as a ‘cytokine storm’, is thought to contribute to flu-related deaths in humans. Continue reading

Ability to isolate, grow breast tissue stem cells could speed cancer research

Ability to isolate, grow breast tissue stem cells could speed cancer research

By carefully controlling the levels of two proteins, researchers at the Salk Institute have discovered how to keep mammary stem cells — those that can form breast tissue — alive and functioning in the lab. Continue reading

Ability to isolate, grow breast tissue stem cells could speed cancer research

Ability to isolate, grow breast tissue stem cells could speed cancer research

By carefully controlling the levels of two proteins, researchers at the Salk Institute have discovered how to keep mammary stem cells — those that can form breast tissue — alive and functioning in the lab. Continue reading

Women and PAD: Excellent treatment outcomes in spite of disease severity

Women and PAD: Excellent treatment outcomes in spite of disease severity

Women face greater limits on their lifestyle and have more severe symptoms as a result of peripheral artery disease (PAD), but minimally invasive procedures used to unclog arteries are just as successful as in men. The success of procedures, such as angioplasty or stent placement, in treating women with leg PAD was revealed in a Journal of the American College of Cardiology study Continue reading

Women and PAD: Excellent treatment outcomes in spite of disease severity

Women and PAD: Excellent treatment outcomes in spite of disease severity

Women face greater limits on their lifestyle and have more severe symptoms as a result of peripheral artery disease (PAD), but minimally invasive procedures used to unclog arteries are just as successful as in men. The success of procedures, such as angioplasty or stent placement, in treating women with leg PAD was revealed in a Journal of the American College of Cardiology study Continue reading