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Tag Archives: Management

New guidelines issued for managing peri- and postoperative atrial fibrillation

New guidelines issued for managing peri- and postoperative atrial fibrillation

The American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS) has released new evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of perioperative and postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) and flutter for thoracic surgical procedures. Continue reading

Lifesaving protocol for school children with severe allergies developed

Lifesaving protocol for school children with severe allergies developed

As the number of children with food allergies in the U.S. increases, so does the risk of children having a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis on school campuses. School nurses often have treatment plans in place for students with diagnosed allergies, but many children have their first allergic reactions at school, where a specific medication, such as EpiPen epinephrine injectors, may not be available and a response protocol may not be in place. Continue reading

Patients call for health professionals to discuss care needs in life-threatening illnesses

Patients call for health professionals to discuss care needs in life-threatening illnesses

Patients with COPD would like healthcare professionals to discuss palliative care needs in more detail, according to a new study. Continue reading

Residency training predicts physicians’ ability to practice conservatively

Residency training predicts physicians’ ability to practice conservatively

Doctors trained in locations with less intensive (and less expensive) practice patterns appear to consistently be better at making clinical decisions that spare patients unnecessary and excessive medical care, according to a new study in JAMA Internal Medicine. “Growing concern about the costs and harms of medical care has spurred interest in assessing physicians’ ability to avoid the provision of unnecessary care,” said lead author Brenda Sirovich of the VA Outcomes Group and The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice. Sirovich and colleagues sought to evaluate whether residency training influences physicians’ capability of making good management decisions, even when those decisions require them to “forgo a wide array of costly medical interventions in favor of management strategies of less intensity, such as watchful waiting.” To do this, the investigators developed a measure based on existing questions from the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying exam Continue reading

New horizon in heart failure: Investigational drug poised to change cardiology?

New horizon in heart failure: Investigational drug poised to change cardiology?

An investigational new heart failure drug could be poised to change the face of cardiology based on Hot Line results presented today at ESC Congress 2014. Findings from the PARADIGM-HF trial, published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine , “are extraordinarily powerful and compelling; they are destined to change the management of patients with chronic heart failure for years to come,” said Milton Packer, MD, co-primary author of the study from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, in Dallas, Texas USA Continue reading

Challenges ahead in improving child health by increasing access to sanitation in India

Challenges ahead in improving child health by increasing access to sanitation in India

A study published in this week’s PLOS Medicine on large-scale rural sanitation programs in India highlights challenges in achieving sufficient access to latrines and reduction in open defecation to yield significant health benefits for young children. The researchers, led by Sumeet Patil from the School of Public Health, University of California at Berkeley, and the Network for Engineering and Economics Research and Management in Mumbai, India conducted a cluster randomised controlled trial in 80 rural villages in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh to measure the effect of India’s Total Sanitation campaign (an initiative to increase access to improved sanitation throughout rural India) on household latrine availability, defecation behaviors, and child health Continue reading

Women with severe, chronic health issues are screened for breast cancer less often

Women with severe, chronic health issues are screened for breast cancer less often

Women with severe disabilities and multiple chronic conditions are screened for breast cancer less often than women with no disabilities or no chronic conditions, a new study has found. They are also screened less often than women with moderate disabilities or women with only one chronic condition, according to Dr. Sara Guilcher, an affiliate scientist with the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Continue reading

Size matters when convincing your brain to eat healthier foods

Size matters when convincing your brain to eat healthier foods

Variety may trump virtue when it comes to the struggle to eat healthy, says a Vanderbilt marketing professor who studies consumer self-control and endorses “vice-virtue bundles” combining nutritious and not-so-nutritious foods. “We suggest a simple … solution that can help consumers who would otherwise choose vice over virtue to simultaneously increase consumption of healthy foods (virtues) and decrease consumption of unhealthy foods (vices) while still fulfilling taste goals — ‘vice-virtue bundles,’” Kelly L. Continue reading

Increased adoption of complex care management can help meet cost savings, quality goals

Increased adoption of complex care management can help meet cost savings, quality goals

The care of patients with complex medical needs is widely regarded as one of the key factors driving increased U.S. health costs, and it is generally accepted that 10 to 15 percent of Medicare patients account for 65 to 75 percent of all Medicare spending. Many of the country’s leading health care organizations have been adopting the strategy of complex care management — assembling multidisciplinary teams of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, mental health professionals and others, with services being coordinated by care managers who work closely with patients and their family members Continue reading

Exposure to inflammatory bowel disease drugs could increase leukemia risk

Exposure to inflammatory bowel disease drugs could increase leukemia risk

Immunosuppressive drugs called thiopurines have been found to increase the risk of myeloid disorders, such as acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, a rare bone marrow disorder, seven-fold among inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. These data were reported in a new study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology , the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA). Thiopurines are an established treatment for IBD patients, used to reduce inflammation and provide symptom relief Continue reading