List/Grid

Tag Archives: Medical

Fertility preservation option for young boys with cancer

Fertility preservation option for young boys with cancer

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center is one of a few centers in the world — and the only one in North Carolina — offering young boys with cancer the opportunity to participate in a research study focused on fertility preservation and restoration. The research, conducted by the Medical Center’s Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) under the direction of Anthony Atala, M.D., institute director, gives boys who have a high risk of becoming sterile the option to “bank” a small piece of testicular tissue prior to treatment. Continue reading

High-speed drug screen developed

High-speed drug screen developed

MIT engineers have devised a way to rapidly test hundreds of different drug-delivery vehicles in living animals, making it easier to discover promising new ways to deliver a class of drugs called biologics, which includes antibodies, peptides, RNA, and DNA, to human patients. In a study appearing in the journal Integrative Biology , the researchers used this technology to identify materials that can efficiently deliver RNA to zebrafish and also to rodents. This type of high-speed screen could help overcome one of the major bottlenecks in developing disease treatments based on biologics: It is challenging to find safe and effective ways to deliver them Continue reading

Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in U.S., comprehensive study finds

Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in U.S., comprehensive study finds

Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the U.S., according to an analysis of death certificates from 1999 to 2010, conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The study, published online today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the U.S. in recent years Continue reading

Ancient human genome from southern Africa throws light on our origins

Ancient human genome from southern Africa throws light on our origins

The skeleton of a man who lived 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tells us about ourselves as humans, and throws some light on our earliest common genetic ancestry. Continue reading

Mesothelioma: New Findings On Treatment Options

Mesothelioma: New Findings On Treatment Options

Treating patients with high-dose radiotherapy after chemotherapy and surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma does not achieve improvements in local relapse and overall survival, according to data from a prospective randomized phase II trial presented at ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid. Continue reading

Human genome was shaped by an evolutionary arms race with itself

Human genome was shaped by an evolutionary arms race with itself

New findings by scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, suggest that an evolutionary arms race between rival elements within the genomes of primates drove the evolution of complex regulatory networks that orchestrate the activity of genes in every cell of our bodies. The arms race is between mobile DNA sequences known as “retrotransposons” (a.k.a Continue reading

Chemotherapy: Rolapitant reduces nausea and vomiting in phase III trial

Chemotherapy: Rolapitant reduces nausea and vomiting in phase III trial

Rolapitant reduces nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III trial presented for the first time today at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain. Dr Martin Chasen, lead author and medical director, Palliative Care, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Canada, said: “This agent makes a significant difference in the way people tolerate their chemotherapy. Patients experienced no loss in quality of life and, in fact, many saw meaningful improvements Continue reading

New protein players found in key disease-related metabolic pathway

New protein players found in key disease-related metabolic pathway

To coordinate their size and growth with current environmental conditions, cells rely on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, which senses cellular stresses, growth factors, and the availability of nutrients, such as amino acids and glucose. Continue reading

Realizing the promise of education: An effective early intervention program for substance exposed babies and toddlers

Realizing the promise of education: An effective early intervention program for substance exposed babies and toddlers

Two decades after its initiation, the University of Miami (UM) Linda Ray Intervention Program for substance-exposed babies and toddlers demonstrates long-term success. The program is designed to help children from birth to three years of age who are developmentally delayed, prenatally exposed to drugs and often with the additional risk of maltreatment, ultimately achieve their developmental milestones and be ready to enter kindergarten ready to learn. The program started in 1993 as an innovative partnership between the UM Linda Ray Intervention Center (LRIC), Miami-Dade Public Schools, Early Steps, Children’s Medical Services, and the Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resources System (FDLRS) and has since expanded to partner with the Juvenile Court in Miami. Continue reading

Complexity of diabetes: Restoring the complexity of the overall blood sugar control system

Complexity of diabetes: Restoring the complexity of the overall blood sugar control system

For millions of people in the United States living with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, measuring the daily rise and fall of blood glucose (sugar) is a way of life. Our body’s energy is primarily governed by glucose in the blood, and blood sugar itself is exquisitely controlled by a complicated set of network interactions involving cells, tissues, organs and hormones that have evolved to keep the glucose on a relatively even keel, pumping it up when it falls too low or knocking it down when it goes too high. Continue reading