List/Grid

Tag Archives: Medical

Scientists find way to trap, kill malaria parasite

Scientists find way to trap, kill malaria parasite

Scientists may be able to entomb the malaria parasite in a prison of its own making, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report July 16 in Nature Continue reading

Poor sleep quality linked to lower physical activity in people with PTSD

Poor sleep quality linked to lower physical activity in people with PTSD

A new study shows that worse sleep quality predicts lower physical activity in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Results show that PTSD was independently associated with worse sleep quality at baseline, and participants with current PTSD at baseline had lower physical activity one year later. Further analysis found that sleep quality completely mediated the relationship between baseline PTSD status and physical activity at the one-year follow-up, providing preliminary evidence that the association of reduced sleep quality with reduced physical activity could comprise a behavioral link to negative health outcomes such as obesity. Continue reading

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may reduce cardiovascular death in type 2 diabetes

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may reduce cardiovascular death in type 2 diabetes

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death and disability among people with Type 2 diabetes. In fact, at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke, according to the American Heart Association. However, a new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center suggests that the use of cholesterol-lowering statins may help prolong the lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease. Continue reading

To accept or not accept: Patients want a say in liver transplant decisions

To accept or not accept: Patients want a say in liver transplant decisions

A novel study reveals that more than half of liver transplant patients want to be informed of donor risk at the time a liver is offered for transplantation. Nearly 80% of those patients want to be involved in the decision of whether or not to accept the organ according to findings published in Liver Transplantation , a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society. Continue reading

‘Mississippi Baby’ now has detectable HIV, researchers find

‘Mississippi Baby’ now has detectable HIV, researchers find

The child known as the “Mississippi baby” — an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall — now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case. “Certainly, this is a disappointing turn of events for this young child, the medical staff involved in the child’s care, and the HIV/AIDS research community,” said NIAID Director Anthony S Continue reading

‘Mississippi Baby’ now has detectable HIV, researchers find

‘Mississippi Baby’ now has detectable HIV, researchers find

The child known as the “Mississippi baby” — an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall — now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case. “Certainly, this is a disappointing turn of events for this young child, the medical staff involved in the child’s care, and the HIV/AIDS research community,” said NIAID Director Anthony S Continue reading

Inherited ‘memory’ of poor nutrition during pregnancy passed through sperm of male offspring

Inherited ‘memory’ of poor nutrition during pregnancy passed through sperm of male offspring

When a pregnant mother is undernourished, her child is at a greater than average risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes, in part due to so-called ‘epigenetic’ effects. A new study in mice demonstrates that this ‘memory’ of nutrition during pregnancy can be passed through sperm of male offspring to the next generation, increasing risk of disease for her grandchildren as well — in other words, to adapt an old maxim, ‘you are what your grandmother ate’ Continue reading

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the largest professional association of neurologists and a leading authority on sports concussion, is releasing a new position paper that states doctors have an ethical obligation to educate and protect athletes from sports concussion and clear them to play only when the athlete is medically ready, standing firm against objections from players, parents or coaches. The statement is published in the July 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the AAN, and is being released ahead of The Sports Concussion Conference, July 11-13, 2014, in Chicago, where the AAN will share the latest scientific advances in diagnosing and treating sports concussion. The AAN position statement calls for doctors to safeguard the future mental and physical health of athletes as a top priority, especially regarding return-to-play decision-making. Continue reading

Safety of fecal transplant to treat C. difficile examined in study

Safety of fecal transplant to treat C. difficile examined in study

Researchers have found that fecal transplantation is effective and safe for treating C. difficile in immunocompromised patients. This is the result of a study led by Colleen Kelly, M.D., a gastroenterologist in the Center for Women’s Gastrointestinal Medicine at The Women’s Medicine Collaborative Continue reading

Expectant moms turn to internet for pregnancy advice more than they would like

Expectant moms turn to internet for pregnancy advice more than they would like

Pregnant women are using the Internet to seek answers to their medical questions more often than they would like, say Penn State researchers. “We found that first-time moms were upset that their first prenatal visit did not occur until eight weeks into pregnancy,” said Jennifer L. Kraschnewski, assistant professor of medicine and public health sciences, Penn State College of Medicine Continue reading