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Tag Archives: Medical

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the largest professional association of neurologists and a leading authority on sports concussion, is releasing a new position paper that states doctors have an ethical obligation to educate and protect athletes from sports concussion and clear them to play only when the athlete is medically ready, standing firm against objections from players, parents or coaches. The statement is published in the July 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the AAN, and is being released ahead of The Sports Concussion Conference, July 11-13, 2014, in Chicago, where the AAN will share the latest scientific advances in diagnosing and treating sports concussion. The AAN position statement calls for doctors to safeguard the future mental and physical health of athletes as a top priority, especially regarding return-to-play decision-making. Continue reading

Safety of fecal transplant to treat C. difficile examined in study

Safety of fecal transplant to treat C. difficile examined in study

Researchers have found that fecal transplantation is effective and safe for treating C. difficile in immunocompromised patients. This is the result of a study led by Colleen Kelly, M.D., a gastroenterologist in the Center for Women’s Gastrointestinal Medicine at The Women’s Medicine Collaborative Continue reading

Expectant moms turn to internet for pregnancy advice more than they would like

Expectant moms turn to internet for pregnancy advice more than they would like

Pregnant women are using the Internet to seek answers to their medical questions more often than they would like, say Penn State researchers. “We found that first-time moms were upset that their first prenatal visit did not occur until eight weeks into pregnancy,” said Jennifer L. Kraschnewski, assistant professor of medicine and public health sciences, Penn State College of Medicine Continue reading

New discovery in living cell signaling

New discovery in living cell signaling

A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy. An international collaboration of researchers, led by scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley, have unlocked the secret behind the activation of the Ras family of proteins, one of the most important components of cellular signaling networks in biology and major drivers of cancers that are among the most difficult to treat Continue reading

Noninvasive advanced image analysis could lead to better patient care

Noninvasive advanced image analysis could lead to better patient care

Lung cancer patients could receive more precise treatment, and their progress could be better tracked, using a new high-tech method of non-invasive medical imaging analysis, according to a study published by the journal PLOS ONE . Genetic changes increasingly are recognized as driving cancer development. But obtaining evidence of these changes usually requires a biopsy, which can be problematic for sensitive regions of the body such as the lungs. Continue reading

New reprogramming method makes better stem cells

New reprogramming method makes better stem cells

A team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) and Salk Institute for Biological Studies has shown for the first time that stem cells created using different methods produce differing cells. The findings, published in the July 2, 2014 online issue of Nature , provide new insights into the basic biology of stem cells and could ultimately lead to improved stem cell therapies. Continue reading

Unprecedented 3-D view of important brain receptor

Unprecedented 3-D view of important brain receptor

Researchers with Oregon Health & Science University’s Vollum Institute have given science a new and unprecedented 3-D view of one of the most important receptors in the brain — a receptor that allows us to learn and remember, and whose dysfunction is involved in a wide range of neurological diseases and conditions, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, schizophrenia and depression. The unprecedented view provided by the OHSU research, published online June 22 in the journal Nature , gives scientists new insight into how the receptor — called the NMDA receptor — is structured Continue reading

Unprecedented 3-D view of important brain receptor

Unprecedented 3-D view of important brain receptor

Researchers with Oregon Health & Science University’s Vollum Institute have given science a new and unprecedented 3-D view of one of the most important receptors in the brain — a receptor that allows us to learn and remember, and whose dysfunction is involved in a wide range of neurological diseases and conditions, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, schizophrenia and depression. The unprecedented view provided by the OHSU research, published online June 22 in the journal Nature , gives scientists new insight into how the receptor — called the NMDA receptor — is structured. Continue reading

The social psychology of nerve cells

The social psychology of nerve cells

The functional organization of the central nervous system depends upon a precise architecture and connectivity of distinct types of neurons. Multiple cell types are present within any brain structure, but the rules governing their positioning, and the molecular mechanisms mediating those rules, have been relatively unexplored. A new study by UC Santa Barbara researchers demonstrates that a particular neuron, the cholinergic amacrine cell, creates a “personal space” in much the same way that people distance themselves from one another in an elevator. Continue reading

Master regulator of key cancer gene found, offers new drug target

Master regulator of key cancer gene found, offers new drug target

A key cancer-causing gene, responsible for up to 20 percent of cancers, may have a weak spot in its armor, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. The partnership of MYC, a gene long linked to cancer, and a non-coding RNA, PVT1, could be the key to understanding how MYC fuels cancer cells. The research is published in the latest issue of the journal Nature . Continue reading