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Tag Archives: medicine

Some immune cells defend only one organ

Some immune cells defend only one organ

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. Continue reading

Suicide epidemic among India’s ‘marginalized’ farmers

Suicide epidemic among India’s ‘marginalized’ farmers

A new study has found that India’s shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with the most debt-ridden farmers who are clinging to tiny smallholdings — less than one hectare — and trying to grow ‘cash crops’, such as cotton and coffee, that are highly susceptible to global price fluctuations. The research supports a range of previous case studies that point to a crisis in key areas of India’s agriculture sector following the ‘liberalization’ of the nation’s economy during the 1990s. Continue reading

HIV-positive women respond well to HPV vaccine, study shows

HIV-positive women respond well to HPV vaccine, study shows

HIV-positive women respond well to a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), even when their immune system is struggling, according to newly published results of an international clinical trial. Continue reading

Potential use of Google Glass in surgical settings

Potential use of Google Glass in surgical settings

An article recently published in the International Journal of Surgery shows the potential applications for Google Glass in the surgical setting, particularly in relation to training. Personal portable information technology is advancing at a breathtaking speed. Continue reading

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. Their results, published in the British Medical Journal , suggest that the youngest children from the most vulnerable populations benefit most and show significant improvements toward expected growth for their age and sex, particularly for weight. Malnutrition in early childhood, reflected in poor growth, is the cause of nearly half of all mortality worldwide in children less than five years old. Continue reading

Everest trek shows how some people get type II diabetes

Everest trek shows how some people get type II diabetes

Scientists have gained new insights into the molecular process of how some people get type II diabetes, which could lead to new ways of preventing people from getting the condition. The research, led by the University of Southampton and UCL, which took place on Mount Everest, assessed the mechanisms by which low oxygen levels in the body — known as hypoxia — are associated with the development of insulin resistance. Continue reading

Severe sleep apnea linked to increased risk of stroke, cancer, death

Severe sleep apnea linked to increased risk of stroke, cancer, death

A new study shows that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death. Results of the 20-year follow-up study show that people with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were four times more likely to die (hazard ratio = 4.2), nearly four times more likely to have a stroke (HR = 3.7), three times more likely to die from cancer (HR = 3.4), and 2.5 times more likely to develop cancer. Results were adjusted for potential confounding factors such as body mass index, smoking status, total cholesterol and blood pressure. Continue reading

Severe sleep apnea linked to increased risk of stroke, cancer, death

Severe sleep apnea linked to increased risk of stroke, cancer, death

A new study shows that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death. Results of the 20-year follow-up study show that people with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were four times more likely to die (hazard ratio = 4.2), nearly four times more likely to have a stroke (HR = 3.7), three times more likely to die from cancer (HR = 3.4), and 2.5 times more likely to develop cancer. Continue reading

Penicillin redux: Rearming proven warriors for the 21st century

Penicillin redux: Rearming proven warriors for the 21st century

Penicillin, one of the scientific marvels of the 20 th century, is currently losing a lot of battles it once won against bacterial infections. But scientists at the University of South Carolina have just reported a new approach to restoring its combat effectiveness, even against so-called “superbugs.” Bacteria have been chipping away at the power of the penicillin family of drugs since their first wide-scale use as antibiotics in the 1940s Continue reading

Penicillin redux: Rearming proven warriors for the 21st century

Penicillin redux: Rearming proven warriors for the 21st century

Penicillin, one of the scientific marvels of the 20 th century, is currently losing a lot of battles it once won against bacterial infections. But scientists at the University of South Carolina have just reported a new approach to restoring its combat effectiveness, even against so-called “superbugs.” Bacteria have been chipping away at the power of the penicillin family of drugs since their first wide-scale use as antibiotics in the 1940s. For example, the staph infection, brought about by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, was once readily treated with penicillin and its molecular cousins. Continue reading