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Tag Archives: medicine

Minimally invasive heart stents prove safer

Minimally invasive heart stents prove safer

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have documented the safety benefits of aortic stent grafts inserted during minimally invasive surgery to repair abdominal aortic aneurysms – weaknesses in the body’s largest artery that can rupture, causing potentially lethal internal bleeding. The study, published July 9 in JAMA Surgery , shows that patients who received the minimally invasive aortic repair procedure had a 42 percent reduction in preventable post-operative complications and a 72 percent reduction in mortality, compared with those who had undergone open repair surgery. The safety of the endovascular “inside blood vessel” procedure also appears to be improving over time, as researchers documented a 37 percent reduction in the likelihood of an avoidable complication between 2003 and 2010. Continue reading

Bacteria hijack plentiful iron supply source to flourish

Bacteria hijack plentiful iron supply source to flourish

In an era of increasing concern about the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant illness, Case Western Reserve researchers have identified a promising new pathway to disabling disease: blocking bacteria’s access to iron in the body. The scientists showed how bacterial siderophore, a small molecule, captures iron from two abundant supply sources to fan bacterial growth — as well as how the body launches a chemical counterassault against this infection process. Their findings appear in a recent edition of The Journal of Experimental Medicine . Continue reading

Effect of depressed mood on pulmonary rehab completion

Effect of depressed mood on pulmonary rehab completion

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have found that people with Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are also depressed have difficulty sticking to a pulmonary rehabilitation program. Continue reading

Safety of fecal transplant to treat C. difficile examined in study

Safety of fecal transplant to treat C. difficile examined in study

Researchers have found that fecal transplantation is effective and safe for treating C. difficile in immunocompromised patients. This is the result of a study led by Colleen Kelly, M.D., a gastroenterologist in the Center for Women’s Gastrointestinal Medicine at The Women’s Medicine Collaborative Continue reading

Incidence of childhood tuberculosis could be 25 percent higher than previous estimates

Incidence of childhood tuberculosis could be 25 percent higher than previous estimates

New estimates indicate that over 650,000 children develop tuberculosis (TB) every year in the 22 countries with a high burden of the disease (HBCs) — almost 25% higher than the total number of new cases worldwide estimated by WHO in 2012 (530,000). Continue reading

Healthcare worker hand hygiene rates increase three-fold when auditors visible

Healthcare worker hand hygiene rates increase three-fold when auditors visible

Hand hygiene rates were found to be three times higher when auditors were visible to healthcare workers than when there were no auditors present, according to a study in a major Canadian acute care hospital. The study, titled, “Quantification of the Hawthorne effect in hand hygiene compliance monitoring using an electronic monitoring system: a retrospective cohort study,” published today on-line in the BMJ Quality & Safety Journal , by first author Dr. Continue reading

Removing gall bladder for suspected common duct stone shows benefit

Removing gall bladder for suspected common duct stone shows benefit

Among patients with possible common duct stones, removal of the gall bladder, compared with endoscopic assessment of the common duct followed by gall bladder removal, resulted in a shorter length of hospital stay without increased illness and fewer common duct examinations, according to a study in the July 9 issue of JAMA . Continue reading

Expectant moms turn to internet for pregnancy advice more than they would like

Expectant moms turn to internet for pregnancy advice more than they would like

Pregnant women are using the Internet to seek answers to their medical questions more often than they would like, say Penn State researchers. “We found that first-time moms were upset that their first prenatal visit did not occur until eight weeks into pregnancy,” said Jennifer L. Kraschnewski, assistant professor of medicine and public health sciences, Penn State College of Medicine Continue reading

Of non-marijuana drug users in the ER, nearly all are problem drug users

Of non-marijuana drug users in the ER, nearly all are problem drug users

Of emergency patients who reported any drug other than marijuana as their primary drug of use, 90.7 percent met the criteria for problematic drug use. Among patients who reported cannabis (marijuana) as their primary drug, almost half (46.6 percent) met the criteria for having a drug problem, according to a study published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine. “Of patients who reported any drug use in the previous 30 days, nearly two-thirds were identified as problem drug users,” said lead study author Wendy Macias-Konstantopoulos, MD, MPH, or the Department of Emergency Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Mass Continue reading

Sweet genes: New way found by which metabolism is linked to the regulation of DNA

Sweet genes: New way found by which metabolism is linked to the regulation of DNA

A research team at the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Alberta have discovered a new way by which metabolism is linked to the regulation of DNA, the basis of our genetic code. The findings may have important implications for the understanding of many common diseases, including cancer. Continue reading