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Breakthroughs made in ovarian cancer research

Breakthroughs made in ovarian cancer research

Scientists at A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) and the Bioinformatics Institute (BII) have found new clues to early detection and personalised treatment of ovarian cancer, currently one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose early due to the lack of symptoms that are unique to the illness. Continue reading

Down syndrome: Behind the scenes of genetics, leukemia

Down syndrome: Behind the scenes of genetics, leukemia

Children affected by trisomy 21 (or Down syndrome) are 50 to 500 times more likely to develop leukemia than other children. A group of geneticists working in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) focused for many years on the genetic characteristics of Down syndrome. Continue reading

Slowing brain functions linked to increased risk of stroke, death

Slowing brain functions linked to increased risk of stroke, death

Cognitive abilities such as memory and attention are not only important after a stroke but also before; according to Declining memory and cognitive ability may increase the risk of stroke in adults over age 65. After stroke, cognitive function declined almost twice as fast Continue reading

Neck manipulation may be associated with stroke

Neck manipulation may be associated with stroke

Manipulating the neck has been associated with cervical dissection, a type of arterial tear that can lead to stroke. Continue reading

Gut microbes browse along gene buffet

Gut microbes browse along gene buffet

In the moist, dark microbial rainforest of the intestine, hundreds of species of microorganisms interact with each other and with the cells of the host animal to get the resources they need to survive and thrive. Though there’s a lot of competition in this vibrant ecosystem, collaboration is valued too. A new study on the crosstalk between microbes and cells lining the gut of mice shows just how cooperative this environment can be Continue reading

Growing human GI cells may lead to personalized treatments

Growing human GI cells may lead to personalized treatments

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient’s gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. Reporting online recently in the journal Gut , researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis said they have made cell lines from individual patients in as little as two weeks. Continue reading

Dramatic growth of grafted stem cells in rat spinal cord

Dramatic growth of grafted stem cells in rat spinal cord

Building upon previous research, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veteran’s Affairs San Diego Healthcare System report that neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and grafted into rats after a spinal cord injury produced cells with tens of thousands of axons extending virtually the entire length of the animals’ central nervous system. Writing in the August 7 early online edition of Neuron , lead scientist Paul Lu, PhD, of the UC San Diego Department of Neurosciences and colleagues said the human iPSC-derived axons extended through the white matter of the injury sites, frequently penetrating adjacent gray matter to form synapses with rat neurons. Continue reading

Gene increases risk of breast cancer to one in three by age 70

Gene increases risk of breast cancer to one in three by age 70

Breast cancer risks for one of potentially the most important genes associated with breast cancer after the BRCA1/2 genes are today reported in the New England Journal of Medicine . Continue reading

Nasal test developed for to diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

Nasal test developed for to diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a study by National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and their Italian colleagues. Continue reading

Increased adoption of complex care management can help meet cost savings, quality goals

Increased adoption of complex care management can help meet cost savings, quality goals

The care of patients with complex medical needs is widely regarded as one of the key factors driving increased U.S. health costs, and it is generally accepted that 10 to 15 percent of Medicare patients account for 65 to 75 percent of all Medicare spending. Many of the country’s leading health care organizations have been adopting the strategy of complex care management — assembling multidisciplinary teams of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, mental health professionals and others, with services being coordinated by care managers who work closely with patients and their family members Continue reading