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Tag Archives: National

Spastic paraplegia: New light shed on cause

Spastic paraplegia: New light shed on cause

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered that a gene mutation linked to hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disabling neurological disorder, interferes with the normal breakdown of triglyceride fat molecules in the brain. The TSRI researchers found large droplets of triglycerides within the neurons of mice modeling the disease. The findings, reported this week online ahead of print by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , point the way to potential therapies and showcase an investigative strategy that should be useful in determining the biochemical causes of other genetic illnesses. Continue reading

Trastuzumab should remain as standard of care for HER2-positive breast cancer, trial suggests

Trastuzumab should remain as standard of care for HER2-positive breast cancer, trial suggests

Analysis of more than 8,000 women who participated in the world’s largest study of two treatments for HER2-positive breast cancer reinforces other findings from the clinical trial showing that trastuzumab (Herceptin) should remain the standard of care for this cancer, says a Mayo Clinic researcher. This study, being presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2014 Congress in Madrid, reveals that when used as a single HER2-targeted therapy in addition to standard chemotherapy, trastuzumab offers a better outcome than does lapatinib (Tykerb), says Edith A. Continue reading

Policies of NIH, other funders, have improved data-sharing by life-science investigators

Policies of NIH, other funders, have improved data-sharing by life-science investigators

Policies put into place by major funding agencies like the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and to a lesser extent by scientific journals, appear to be meeting the goal of increasing the sharing of scientific resources among life science investigators. As reported in the open-access journal PLOS ONE , 65 percent of surveyed investigators at major U.S Continue reading

Child maltreatment underreported in medicaid claims, study finds

Child maltreatment underreported in medicaid claims, study finds

Medicaid claims are a poor way to identify child abuse and neglect at a population level, according to a study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. Lead author Ramesh Raghavan, PhD, associate professor at the Brown School and of psychiatry at the School of Medicine, examined Medicaid records from 36 states for 1,921 children in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, whom caseworkers had identified as having been maltreated, and who had received Medicaid-funded services. Continue reading

Many Patients Excluded From Lung Cancer Clinical Trials Due to Prior Cancer, Study Finds

Many Patients Excluded From Lung Cancer Clinical Trials Due to Prior Cancer, Study Finds

Lung cancer clinical trials exclude a substantial proportion of patients due to a history of prior cancer, as shown in an analysis by cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Among more than 50 lung cancer clinical trials examined, more than 80 percent excluded patients with prior cancer from participating, according to the study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Continue reading

ADHD: Brains not recognizing angry expressions

ADHD: Brains not recognizing angry expressions

Inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior in children with ADHD can result in social problems and they tend to be excluded from peer activities. They have been found to have impaired recognition of emotional expression from other faces. Continue reading

Federal food program puts food on the table, but dietary quality could be improved

Federal food program puts food on the table, but dietary quality could be improved

A new American Cancer Society study suggests that participants in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), previously known as the food stamp program, had lower dietary quality scores compared with income eligible non-participants. The authors say the findings emphasize the need to bolster programs aimed at enhancing the dietary quality of SNAP participants. Continue reading

Some concussion education more useful than others, parents say

Some concussion education more useful than others, parents say

Many parents whose kids participate in athletics will be asked to sign a waiver about concussion education, but that’s not enough to ensure parents are confident about handling the injury, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health. In the poll, about half of the 912 parents of middle and high school children surveyed reported participation in some type of concussion education: • 23% have read a brochure or online information • 17% have watched a video or attended a presentation • 11% have signed a waiver form, with no other educational component • 49% report no concussion education at all Concussion education is more common among parents of children who play sports compared to non-sports parents (58% vs 31%). Continue reading

Some concussion education more useful than others, parents say

Some concussion education more useful than others, parents say

Many parents whose kids participate in athletics will be asked to sign a waiver about concussion education, but that’s not enough to ensure parents are confident about handling the injury, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health. In the poll, about half of the 912 parents of middle and high school children surveyed reported participation in some type of concussion education: • 23% have read a brochure or online information • 17% have watched a video or attended a presentation • 11% have signed a waiver form, with no other educational component • 49% report no concussion education at all Concussion education is more common among parents of children who play sports compared to non-sports parents (58% vs 31%). Continue reading

Nurse survey shows longer working hours impact on quality of care

Nurse survey shows longer working hours impact on quality of care

Results of a survey of more than 30,000 nurses across Europe show that nurses who work longer shifts and more overtime are more likely to rate the standard of care delivered on their ward as poor, give a negative rating of their hospitals safety and omit necessary patient care. Led by researchers at the University of Southampton and the National Nursing Research Unit (NNRU) at King’s College London, the RN4CAST survey of nurses in over 450 hospitals across 12 European countries, was part of an international research programme looking at links between nursing workforce issues and patient outcomes Continue reading