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Tag Archives: Nature

Spinal cord neurons that control skilled limb movement identified

Spinal cord neurons that control skilled limb movement identified

Researchers have identified two types of neurons that enable the spinal cord to control skilled forelimb movement. The first is a group of excitatory interneurons that are needed to make accurate and precise movements; the second is a group of inhibitory interneurons necessary for achieving smooth movement of the limbs Continue reading

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat-related injury — caused by regular car accidents, falls and burns — is the most common reason for pediatric admissions to U.S. military combat hospitals in both Iraq and Afghanistan reveals new study findings published in the May issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons . Continue reading

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat-related injury — caused by regular car accidents, falls and burns — is the most common reason for pediatric admissions to U.S. Continue reading

Hybrid technology could make Star Trek-style tricorder a reality

Hybrid technology could make Star Trek-style tricorder a reality

Scientists at the University of Southampton are aiming to develop a handheld testing device to provide same day diagnosis from a patient’s bedside. In the fictional Star-Trek universe, the tricorder was used to remotely scan patients for a diagnosis Continue reading

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. Continue reading

Autism begins in pregnancy, according to study: Cortical layers disrupted during brain development in autism

Autism begins in pregnancy, according to study: Cortical layers disrupted during brain development in autism

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Allen Institute for Brain Science have published a study that gives clear and direct new evidence that autism begins during pregnancy. The study will be published in the March 27 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine . Continue reading

Bacterial reporters that get the scoop: Engineered gut bacteria ‘remembers’ what it saw

Bacterial reporters that get the scoop: Engineered gut bacteria ‘remembers’ what it saw

It’s a jungle in there. Continue reading

Potential of differentiated iPS cells in cell therapy without immune rejection

Potential of differentiated iPS cells in cell therapy without immune rejection

Jan. 25, 2013 — A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) shows that tissues derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in an experimental model were not rejected when transplanted back into genetically identical recipients. The study, published online in Cell Stem Cell , demonstrates the potential of utilizing iPS cells to develop cell types that could offer treatment for a wide range of conditions, including diabetes, liver and lung diseases, without the barrier of immune rejection Continue reading

Controversial bird flu work resumes

Controversial bird flu work resumes

23 January 2013 Last updated at 13:00 ET By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News Controversial research into making bird flu easier to spread in people is to resume after a year-long pause. Continue reading

Novel approaches needed to end growing scourge of ‘superbugs’

Novel approaches needed to end growing scourge of ‘superbugs’

Jan. 23, 2013 — With the rising awareness of the so-called “superbugs,” bacteria that are resistant to most known antibiotics, three infectious disease experts writing in the Jan Continue reading