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Tag Archives: Nature

Insights into genetics of cleft lip

Insights into genetics of cleft lip

Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, have identified how a specific stretch of DNA controls far-off genes to influence the formation of the face. Continue reading

Measuring fine dust concentration via smartphone

Measuring fine dust concentration via smartphone

Big cities in the smog: Photos from Beijing and, more recently, Paris clearly illustrate the extent of fine dust pollution. But what about our direct environment? What is the pollution concentration near our favorite jogging route? Continue reading

New sensor could light the way forward in low-cost medical imaging

New sensor could light the way forward in low-cost medical imaging

New research published today in Nature’s Scientific Reports , identifies a new type of light sensor that could allow medical and security imaging, via low cost cameras. The team of researchers from the University of Surrey have developed a new ‘multispectral’ light sensor that detects the full spectrum of light, from ultra-violet (UV), to visible and near infrared light Continue reading

Galectins direct immunity against bacteria that employ camouflage

Galectins direct immunity against bacteria that employ camouflage

Our bodies produce a family of proteins that recognize and kill bacteria whose carbohydrate coatings resemble those of our own cells too closely, scientists have discovered. Called galectins, these proteins recognize carbohydrates from a broad range of disease-causing bacteria, and could potentially be deployed as antibiotics to treat certain infections. Continue reading

Spinal cord neurons that control skilled limb movement identified

Spinal cord neurons that control skilled limb movement identified

Researchers have identified two types of neurons that enable the spinal cord to control skilled forelimb movement. The first is a group of excitatory interneurons that are needed to make accurate and precise movements; the second is a group of inhibitory interneurons necessary for achieving smooth movement of the limbs Continue reading

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat-related injury — caused by regular car accidents, falls and burns — is the most common reason for pediatric admissions to U.S. Continue reading

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat injury top reason for pediatric care by military surgeons in Afghanistan, Iraq

Noncombat-related injury — caused by regular car accidents, falls and burns — is the most common reason for pediatric admissions to U.S. military combat hospitals in both Iraq and Afghanistan reveals new study findings published in the May issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons . Continue reading

Hybrid technology could make Star Trek-style tricorder a reality

Hybrid technology could make Star Trek-style tricorder a reality

Scientists at the University of Southampton are aiming to develop a handheld testing device to provide same day diagnosis from a patient’s bedside. In the fictional Star-Trek universe, the tricorder was used to remotely scan patients for a diagnosis Continue reading

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. Continue reading

Autism begins in pregnancy, according to study: Cortical layers disrupted during brain development in autism

Autism begins in pregnancy, according to study: Cortical layers disrupted during brain development in autism

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Allen Institute for Brain Science have published a study that gives clear and direct new evidence that autism begins during pregnancy. The study will be published in the March 27 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine . Continue reading