List/Grid

Tag Archives: Nature

Lack of facial expression leads to perceptions of unhappiness, new research shows

Lack of facial expression leads to perceptions of unhappiness, new research shows

People with facial paralysis are perceived as being less happy simply because they can’t communicate in the universal language of facial expression, a new study from an Oregon State University psychology professor shows. The findings highlight the important role the face plays in everyday communication and indicates people may hold a prejudice against those with facial paralysis because of their disability, said Kathleen Bogart, an assistant professor of psychology in the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University. “People are more wary and more likely to form a negative impression of someone with a disability,” Bogart said Continue reading

Toward a theory of child well-being

Toward a theory of child well-being

For most of us, being healthy is more than lack of disease. It is a state of physical and mental well-being Continue reading

New enzyme targets for selective cancer therapies

New enzyme targets for selective cancer therapies

Thanks to important discoveries in basic and clinical research and technological advances, the fight against cancer has mobilized into a complex offensive spanning multiple fronts. Work happening in a University of Alberta chemistry lab could help find new and more selective therapies for cancer. Researchers have developed a compound that targets a specific enzyme overexpressed in certain cancers — and they have tested its activity in cells from brain tumours Continue reading

Thousands ‘eligible for Ebola drugs’

Thousands ‘eligible for Ebola drugs’

unable to retrieve full-text contentAround 30,000 people could have been eligible for drugs in the current Ebola outbreak – if they had been available, a report in Nature suggests. Continue reading

Thousands ‘eligible for Ebola drugs’

Thousands ‘eligible for Ebola drugs’

unable to retrieve full-text contentAround 30,000 people could have been eligible for drugs in the current Ebola outbreak – if they had been available, a report in Nature suggests. Continue reading

Powerful new system for classifying tumors revealed

Powerful new system for classifying tumors revealed

Cancers are classified primarily on the basis of where in the body the disease originates, as in lung cancer or breast cancer. According to a new study, however, one in ten cancer patients would be classified differently using a new classification system based on molecular subtypes instead of the current tissue-of-origin system. Continue reading

Adding alcohol to energy drinks leads to an increased urge to drink

Adding alcohol to energy drinks leads to an increased urge to drink

Public health advocates in recent years have become concerned not with the consumption of energy drinks by youth but also their joint consumption with alcohol by young adults. New research provides evidence of a mechanism through which energy drinks may increase binge drinking: combining energy drinks with alcohol increases people’s desire to keep drinking more than if they drank alcohol alone. Results will be published in the August 2014 online-only issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research and are currently available at Early View. Continue reading

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Certain bonds connecting biological cells get stronger when they’re tugged. Those bonds could help keep hearts together and pumping; breakdowns of those bonds could help cancer cells break away and spread. Those bonds are known as catch bonds and they’re formed by common adhesion proteins called cadherins. Continue reading

Brain signals link physical fitness to better language skills in kids

Brain signals link physical fitness to better language skills in kids

Children who are physically fit have faster and more robust neuro-electrical brain responses during reading than their less-fit peers, researchers report. These differences correspond with better language skills in the children who are more fit, and occur whether they’re reading straightforward sentences or sentences that contain errors of grammar or syntax. The new findings, reported in the journal Brain and Cognition , do not prove that higher fitness directly influences the changes seen in the electrical activity of the brain, the researchers say, but offer a potential mechanism to explain why fitness correlates so closely with better cognitive performance on a variety of tasks. Continue reading

Researchers see stem cells take key step toward development: A first

Researchers see stem cells take key step toward development: A first

The gap between stem cell research and regenerative medicine just became a lot narrower, thanks to a new technique that coaxes stem cells, with potential to become any tissue type, to take the first step to specialization. It is the first time this critical step has been demonstrated in a laboratory. University of Illinois researchers, in collaboration with scientists at Notre Dame University and the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China, published their results in the journal Nature Communications Continue reading