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Tag Archives: Nature

Researchers watch tiny living machines self-assemble

Researchers watch tiny living machines self-assemble

ScienceDaily (June 10, 2012) — Enabling bioengineers to design new molecular machines for nanotechnology applications is one of the possible outcomes of a study by University of Montreal researchers that was published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology June 10. The scientists have developed a new approach to visualize how proteins assemble, which may also significantly aid our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, which are caused by errors in assembly Continue reading

New insight into placental growth and healthy pregnancy

New insight into placental growth and healthy pregnancy

ScienceDaily (June 10, 2012) — Scientists at the Babraham Institute have gained a new understanding of how the growth of the placenta is regulated before birth, which has important implications for a healthy pregnancy. Continue reading

Study links PTSD to hidden head injuries suffered in combat

Study links PTSD to hidden head injuries suffered in combat

ScienceDaily (June 6, 2012) — Even when brain injury is so subtle that it can only be detected by an ultra-sensitive imaging test, the injury might predispose soldiers in combat to post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a University of Rochester Medical Center study. The research is important for physicians who are caring for troops in the years following deployment, as they try to untangle the symptom overlap between PTSD and mild traumatic brain injury (mild TBI) and provide the appropriate treatment. Until now, the nature of the interaction between TBI and PTSD was unclear Continue reading

Health board contract questioned

Health board contract questioned

29 May 2012 Last updated at 06:47 ET The health secretary has asked NHS Lothian to explain a contract it says its former chief executive placed with a management consultancy firm. The contract, for £75,000, was placed with HD Partners. NHS Lothian said the contract covered two pieces of work related to the management of waiting times. Continue reading

Ion-based electronic chip to control muscles: Entirely new circuit technology based on ions and molecules

Ion-based electronic chip to control muscles: Entirely new circuit technology based on ions and molecules

ScienceDaily (May 29, 2012) — Klas Tybrandt, doctoral student in organic electronics at Linkoping University, Sweden, has developed an integrated chemical chip. The results have just been published in the journal Nature Communications. The Organic Electronics research group at Linköping University previously developed ion transistors for transport of both positive and negative ions, as well as biomolecules Continue reading

Gardeners told ‘wash off compost’

Gardeners told ‘wash off compost’

27 May 2012 Last updated at 20:40 ET By Eleanor Bradford BBC Scotland Health Correspondent Gardeners are being warned to wash their hands after using compost following a series of Legionella cases in Scotland over the past five years. One man has died and five others have become ill after contracting a rare strain called ‘Legionella longbeachae’, which appears to come from compost. The unusual strain is well known in Australia and New Zealand, where bags of compost carry warning labels. Continue reading

Persistent sensory experience is good for aging brain

Persistent sensory experience is good for aging brain

ScienceDaily (May 24, 2012) — Despite a long-held scientific belief that much of the wiring of the brain is fixed by the time of adolescence, a new study shows that changes in sensory experience can cause massive rewiring of the brain, even as one ages. In addition, the study found that this rewiring involves fibers that supply the primary input to the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain that is responsible for sensory perception, motor control and cognition. Continue reading

Persistent sensory experience is good for aging brain

Persistent sensory experience is good for aging brain

ScienceDaily (May 24, 2012) — Despite a long-held scientific belief that much of the wiring of the brain is fixed by the time of adolescence, a new study shows that changes in sensory experience can cause massive rewiring of the brain, even as one ages. In addition, the study found that this rewiring involves fibers that supply the primary input to the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain that is responsible for sensory perception, motor control and cognition. These findings promise to open new avenues of research on brain remodeling and aging. Continue reading

New approach to ‘spell checking’ gene sequences

New approach to ‘spell checking’ gene sequences

ScienceDaily (May 21, 2012) — A PhD student from CSIRO and the University of Queensland has found a better way to ‘spell check’ gene sequences and help biologists better understand the natural world. The student, Lauren Bragg, has contributed to the May issue of the journal Nature Methods highlighting her new approach and its software implementation called Acacia Continue reading

Cheap dysentery drug ‘promising’

Cheap dysentery drug ‘promising’

20 May 2012 Last updated at 14:26 ET By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News A cheap drug, which is already prescribed for arthritis, could fight amoebic dysentery, according to researchers in the US. Continue reading