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Tag Archives: neurology

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain “pruning” process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). Continue reading

Surprising differences in how teen athletes experience concussion

Surprising differences in how teen athletes experience concussion

With multiple concussions between the two of them, Dan Han and Lisa Koehl’s latest research interest isn’t surprising. “I played competitive soccer through high school and continue to play recreationally,” says Koehl, a doctoral candidate in the University of Kentucky’s Department of Psychology, “so I have firsthand experience with the dynamics that come into play when a teen suffers a concussion.” As a former high school assistant principal in the Chicago public school system, Han was responsible for overseeing student-athletes’ return to school after a concussion. Han left educational administration to pursue his doctorate in neuropsychology Continue reading

Focal blood-brain-barrier disruption with high-frequency pulsed electric fields

Focal blood-brain-barrier disruption with high-frequency pulsed electric fields

A team of researchers from the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences have developed a new way of using electricity to open the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Continue reading

Scientists confirm effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation in MS

Scientists confirm effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation in MS

Date: August 8, 2014 Source: Kessler Foundation Summary: In individuals with MS, patterns of brain activity associated with learning were maintained at six months post training, scientists report in a new article following up on a long term study. For the pilot study, participants underwent evaluation of memory performance and brain activity at baseline, immediately following memory retraining, and at 6-month followup. Results showed that the patterns of increased cerebral activation that correlated with learning were maintained at 6-month followup Continue reading

Sleep deficiency and sleep medication use in astronauts

Sleep deficiency and sleep medication use in astronauts

In an extensive study of sleep monitoring and sleeping pill use in astronauts, researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Colorado found that astronauts suffer considerable sleep deficiency in the weeks leading up to and during space flight. Continue reading

Neck manipulation may be associated with stroke

Neck manipulation may be associated with stroke

Manipulating the neck has been associated with cervical dissection, a type of arterial tear that can lead to stroke. Continue reading

New Treatment Successful for Rare, Disabling Movement Disorder, the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS)

New Treatment Successful for Rare, Disabling Movement Disorder, the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS)

People who suffer from a rare illness, the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS), now have a chance for full recovery thanks to treatment developed by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Their findings were published online in the July issue of Frontiers in Neurology. People often feel a sensation of movement, called Mal de Debarquement, after they have finished boating, surfing or a sea voyage. Continue reading

Another potential ALS treatment avenue identfied by researchers

Another potential ALS treatment avenue identfied by researchers

A series of studies begun by Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) scientists eight years ago has lead to a report published today that may be a major step forward in the quest to develop real treatments for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. The findings by Harvard professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology (HSCRB) Kevin Eggan and colleagues also has produced functionally identical results in human motor neurons in a laboratory dish and in a mouse model of the disease, demonstrating that the modeling of human disease with customized stem cells in the laboratory could someday relatively soon eliminate some of the need for animal testing. Continue reading

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. Continue reading

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. Continue reading