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Tag Archives: Neuroscience

Sensing neuronal activity with light

Sensing neuronal activity with light

For years, neuroscientists have been trying to develop tools that would allow them to clearly view the brain’s circuitry in action — from the first moment a neuron fires to the resulting behavior in a whole organism. To get this complete picture, neuroscientists are working to develop a range of new tools to study the brain. Continue reading

Zebrafish Model of a Learning and Memory Disorder Shows Better Way to Target Treatment

Zebrafish Model of a Learning and Memory Disorder Shows Better Way to Target Treatment

Using a zebrafish model of a human genetic disease called neurofibromatosis (NF1), a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that the learning and memory components of the disorder are distinct features that will likely need different treatment approaches. They published their results this month in Cell Reports . Continue reading

Brain inflammation dramatically disrupts memory retrieval networks, study finds

Brain inflammation dramatically disrupts memory retrieval networks, study finds

Brain inflammation can rapidly disrupt our ability to retrieve complex memories of similar but distinct experiences, according to UC Irvine neuroscientists Jennifer Czerniawski and John Guzowski. Continue reading

Multiple sclerosis researchers find role for working memory in cognitive reserve

Multiple sclerosis researchers find role for working memory in cognitive reserve

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown that working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis (MS). This finding informs the relationships between working memory, intellectual enrichment (the proxy measure for cognitive reserve) and long-term memory in this population. “Working memory mediates the relationship between intellectual enrichment and long-term memory in multiple sclerosis: An exploratory analysis of cognitive reserve”  was published online ahead of print by the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society on July 14. Continue reading

The yin and yang of overcoming cocaine addiction

The yin and yang of overcoming cocaine addiction

Yaoying Ma says that biology, by nature, has a yin and a yang — a push and a pull. Addiction, particularly relapse, she finds, is no exception Continue reading

Study of self-awareness in MS has implications for rehabilitation

Study of self-awareness in MS has implications for rehabilitation

A new study of self-awareness by Kessler Foundation researchers shows that persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be able to improve their self-awareness through task-oriented cognitive rehabilitation. The study was epublished ahead of print on July 2 in NeuroRehabilitation . Self-awareness is one’s ability to recognize cognitive problems caused by brain injury. Continue reading

Maturing brain flips function of amygdala in regulating stress hormones

Maturing brain flips function of amygdala in regulating stress hormones

In contrast to evidence that the amygdala stimulates stress responses in adults, researchers at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have found that the amygdala has an inhibitory effect on stress hormones during the early development of nonhuman primates. The results are published this week in Journal of Neuroscience . The amygdala is a region of the brain known to be important for responses to threatening situations and learning about threats Continue reading

Taking pulse of aging of the brain

Taking pulse of aging of the brain

Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technique that can noninvasively image the pulse pressure and elasticity of the arteries of the brain, revealing correlations between arterial health and aging. Brain artery support, which makes up the cerebrovascular system, is crucial for healthy brain aging and preventing diseases like Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. Continue reading

Brain imaging shows brain differences in risk-taking teens

Brain imaging shows brain differences in risk-taking teens

According to the CDC, unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death for adolescents. Compared to the two leading causes of death for all Americans, heart disease and cancer, a pattern of questionable decision-making in dire situations comes to light in teen mortality. New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas investigating brain differences associated with risk-taking teens found that connections between certain brain regions are amplified in teens more prone to risk Continue reading

Bats bolster brain hypothesis, maybe technology, too

Bats bolster brain hypothesis, maybe technology, too

Amid a neuroscience debate about how people and animals focus on distinct objects within cluttered scenes, some of the newest and best evidence comes from the way bats “see” with their ears, according to a new paper in the Journal of Experimental Biology . In fact, the perception process in question could improve sonar and radar technology. Continue reading