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Tag Archives: Neuroscience

Researchers identify brain network with mapping technique

Researchers identify brain network with mapping technique

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have utilized a new image-based strategy to identify and measure placebo effects in randomized clinical trials for brain disorders. The findings are published in the August issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation . Continue reading

Researchers identify brain network with mapping technique

Researchers identify brain network with mapping technique

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have utilized a new image-based strategy to identify and measure placebo effects in randomized clinical trials for brain disorders. The findings are published in the August issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation . Continue reading

Experts urge new discipline combining benefits of neuroscience, psychology treatments

Experts urge new discipline combining benefits of neuroscience, psychology treatments

When a patient talks with a psychological therapist, what changes occur in the patient’s brain that relieve mental disorders? UCLA psychology professor Michelle Craske says the honest answer is that we don’t know. Continue reading

Personalized approach enhances communication skills in children with autism

Personalized approach enhances communication skills in children with autism

A UCLA-led study has found that the communication skills of minimally verbal children with autism can be greatly improved through personalized interventions that are combined with the use of computer tablets. Continue reading

Hidden Variations in Neuronal Networks May Explain Differences In Traumatic Brain Injury Outcomes

Hidden Variations in Neuronal Networks May Explain Differences In Traumatic Brain Injury Outcomes

A team of researchers at the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University has discovered that hidden differences in the properties of neural circuits can account for whether animals are behaviorally susceptible to brain injury. These results could have implications for the treatment of brain trauma Continue reading

Huntington’s disease protein helps wire young brain

Huntington’s disease protein helps wire young brain

The protein that is mutated in Huntington’s disease is critical for wiring the brain in early life, according to a new Duke University study. Huntington’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes a wide variety of symptoms, such as uncontrolled movements, inability to focus or remember, depression and aggression. By the time these symptoms appear, usually in middle age, the disease has already ravaged the brain. Continue reading

Who will binge-drink at age 16? Teen imaging study pinpoints predictors

Who will binge-drink at age 16? Teen imaging study pinpoints predictors

Neuroscientists leading the largest longitudinal adolescent brain imaging study to date have learned that predicting teenage binge-drinking is possible. Continue reading

Noninvasive brain control: New light-sensitive protein enables simpler, more powerful optogenetics

Noninvasive brain control: New light-sensitive protein enables simpler, more powerful optogenetics

Optogenetics, a technology that allows scientists to control brain activity by shining light on neurons, relies on light-sensitive proteins that can suppress or stimulate electrical signals within cells. This technique requires a light source to be implanted in the brain, where it can reach the cells to be controlled Continue reading

The social psychology of nerve cells

The social psychology of nerve cells

The functional organization of the central nervous system depends upon a precise architecture and connectivity of distinct types of neurons. Multiple cell types are present within any brain structure, but the rules governing their positioning, and the molecular mechanisms mediating those rules, have been relatively unexplored. A new study by UC Santa Barbara researchers demonstrates that a particular neuron, the cholinergic amacrine cell, creates a “personal space” in much the same way that people distance themselves from one another in an elevator. Continue reading

Neurons get their neighbors to take out their trash

Neurons get their neighbors to take out their trash

Biologists have long considered cells to function like self-cleaning ovens, chewing up and recycling their own worn out parts as needed. But a new study challenges that basic principle, showing that some nerve cells found in the eye pass off their old energy-producing factories to neighboring support cells to be “eaten.” The find, which may bear on the roots of glaucoma, also has implications for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other diseases that involve a buildup of “garbage” in brain cells Continue reading