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Tag Archives: Neuroscience

Life stressors trigger neurological disorders, researchers find

Life stressors trigger neurological disorders, researchers find

When mothers are exposed to trauma, illness, alcohol or other drug abuse, these stressors may activate a single molecular trigger in brain cells that can go awry and activate conditions such as schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder and some forms of autism. Until now, it has been unclear how much these stressors have impacted the cells of a developing brain. Past studies have shown that when an expectant mother exposes herself to alcohol or drug abuse or she experiences some trauma or illness, her baby may later develop a psychiatric disorder, including some forms of autism or post-traumatic stress disorder, later in life. Continue reading

Novel function of protein linked to Alzheimer’s disease discovered

Novel function of protein linked to Alzheimer’s disease discovered

A research team led by the National Neuroscience Institute (NNI) has uncovered a novel function of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), one of the main pathogenic culprits of Alzheimer’s disease. This discovery may help researchers understand how the protein goes awry in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients, and potentially paves the way for the development of innovative therapeutics to improve the brain function of dementia patients. The findings were published in the scientific research journal Nature Communications last month Continue reading

Finding turns neuroanatomy on its head: Researchers present new view of myelin

Finding turns neuroanatomy on its head: Researchers present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. Myelin, the electrical insulating material long known to be essential for the fast transmission of impulses along the axons of nerve cells, is not as ubiquitous as thought, according to a new work lead by Professor Paola Arlotta of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) and the University’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, in collaboration with Professor Jeff Lichtman, of Harvard’s Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. “Myelin is a relatively recent invention during evolution,” says Arlotta. Continue reading

Finding turns neuroanatomy on its head: Researchers present new view of myelin

Finding turns neuroanatomy on its head: Researchers present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. Myelin, the electrical insulating material long known to be essential for the fast transmission of impulses along the axons of nerve cells, is not as ubiquitous as thought, according to a new work lead by Professor Paola Arlotta of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) and the University’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, in collaboration with Professor Jeff Lichtman, of Harvard’s Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. “Myelin is a relatively recent invention during evolution,” says Arlotta. Continue reading

How kids’ brain structures grow as memory develops

How kids’ brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring how these brain regions develop at this crucial time. Eventually, that could give insights into disorders that typically emerge in the transition into and during adolescence and affect memory, such as schizophrenia and depression Continue reading

How kids’ brain structures grow as memory develops

How kids’ brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring how these brain regions develop at this crucial time Continue reading

How smells stick to your memories: Your nose can be a pathfinder

How smells stick to your memories: Your nose can be a pathfinder

Waves in your brain make smells stick to your memories and inner maps: When I was a child I used to sit in my grandfather’s workshop, playing with wood shavings. Continue reading

Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults: More ‘joints’ equal more damage

Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults: More ‘joints’ equal more damage

The size and shape of two brain regions involved in emotion and motivation may differ in young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week, according to a study published April 16 in The Journal of Neuroscience . The findings suggest that recreational marijuana use may lead to previously unidentified brain changes, and highlight the importance of research aimed at understanding the long-term effects of low to moderate marijuana use on the brain. Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, with an estimated 18.9 million people reporting recent use, according to the most current analysis of the National Survey on Drug Use and Mental Health. Continue reading

How nerve cells flexibly adapt to acoustic signals

How nerve cells flexibly adapt to acoustic signals

How nerve cells flexibly adapt to acoustic signals: Depending on the input signal, neurons generate action potentials either near or far away from the cell body. Continue reading

How nerve cells flexibly adapt to acoustic signals

How nerve cells flexibly adapt to acoustic signals

How nerve cells flexibly adapt to acoustic signals: Depending on the input signal, neurons generate action potentials either near or far away from the cell body. Continue reading