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Health policy researchers lack confidence in social media for communicating scientific evidence

Health policy researchers lack confidence in social media for communicating scientific evidence

Though Twitter boats 645 million users across the world, only 14 percent of health policy researchers reported using Twitter — and approximately 20 percent used blogs and Facebook — to communicate their research findings over the past year, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In contrast, sixty-five percent used traditional media channels, such as press releases or media interviews Continue reading

Science of school lunch: Pictures tell story about lunch policies, healthy consumption

Science of school lunch: Pictures tell story about lunch policies, healthy consumption

In terms of ambience, Charlotte Central’s cafeteria is — well, conjure up your own elementary school lunch experience. There’s more than one reason to run to recess. Continue reading

Science of school lunch: Pictures tell story about lunch policies, healthy consumption

Science of school lunch: Pictures tell story about lunch policies, healthy consumption

In terms of ambience, Charlotte Central’s cafeteria is — well, conjure up your own elementary school lunch experience. There’s more than one reason to run to recess. Continue reading

Science of school lunch: Pictures tell story about lunch policies, healthy consumption

Science of school lunch: Pictures tell story about lunch policies, healthy consumption

In terms of ambience, Charlotte Central’s cafeteria is — well, conjure up your own elementary school lunch experience. There’s more than one reason to run to recess. Continue reading

Chemists discover structure of cancer drug candidate

Chemists discover structure of cancer drug candidate

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have determined the correct structure of a highly promising anticancer compound approved by the U.S. Continue reading

Methadone programs can be key in educating, treating Hepatitis C patients

Methadone programs can be key in educating, treating Hepatitis C patients

People who inject drugs and are enrolled in a drug treatment program are receptive to education about, and treatment for, hepatitis C virus, according to a study by researchers at several institutions, including the University at Buffalo. That finding, published online this week in the Journal of Addiction Medicine will be welcome news to health care providers. The paper notes that injection drug use is a primary mode of infection, making for an HCV infection prevalence as high as 80 percent among people who inject drugs. Continue reading

As carbon dioxide levels rise, some crop nutrients will fall, researchers find

As carbon dioxide levels rise, some crop nutrients will fall, researchers find

Researchers have some bad news for future farmers and eaters: As carbon dioxide levels rise this century, some grains and legumes will become significantly less nutritious than they are today. The new findings are reported in the journal Nature Continue reading

Nerve damage after hip surgery may be due to inflammation

Nerve damage after hip surgery may be due to inflammation

A recent Mayo Clinic Proceedings article links some nerve damage after hip surgery to inflammatory neuropathy. Historically, nerve damage from hip surgery has been attributed to mechanical factors caused by anesthesiologists or surgeons, such as positioning of the patient during surgery or direct surgical injury of the nerves. Continue reading

Dementia diagnosis twice as likely if older adult has schizophrenia; Cancer less likely

Dementia diagnosis twice as likely if older adult has schizophrenia; Cancer less likely

Researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University who followed over 30,000 older adults for a decade have found the rate of dementia diagnosis for patients with schizophrenia to be twice as high as for patients without this chronic, severe and disabling brain disorder. Continue reading

US newspaper reporting of suicide linked with some teenage suicide clusters

US newspaper reporting of suicide linked with some teenage suicide clusters

Heightened newspaper coverage after a suicide might have a significant impact on the initiation of some teenage suicide clusters, according to new research published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. The study reveals that the content of media reports is also important, with more prominent stories (ie, published on the front page) and those that describe the suicide in considerable detail more likely to be associated with so-called copycat suicides Continue reading