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Tag Archives: observation

Long antibiotic treatments: Slowly growing bacteria to blame

Long antibiotic treatments: Slowly growing bacteria to blame

Whether pneumonia or sepsis — infectious diseases are becoming increasingly difficult to treat. One reason for this is the growing antibiotic resistance. But even non-resistant bacteria can survive antibiotics for some time, and that’s why treatments need to be continued for several days or weeks Continue reading

Blood donations could help reduce the risk of heart disease in shift workers

Blood donations could help reduce the risk of heart disease in shift workers

Austrian researchers have found that jetlag has severe effects on red blood cells, possibly explaining the high incidence of heart disease seen in shift workers. Continue reading

Psilocybin inhibits the processing of negative emotions in the brain

Psilocybin inhibits the processing of negative emotions in the brain

Emotions like fear, anger, sadness, and joy enable people to adjust to their environment and react flexibly to stress and strain and are vital for cognitive processes, physiological reactions, and social behaviour. The processing of emotions is closely linked to structures in the brain, i.e Continue reading

How does stress increase risk for stroke, heart attack?

How does stress increase risk for stroke, heart attack?

Scientists have shown that anger, anxiety, and depression not only affect the functioning of the heart, but also increase the risk for heart disease. Stroke and heart attacks are the end products of progressive damage to blood vessels supplying the heart and brain, a process called atherosclerosis Continue reading

How does stress increase risk for stroke, heart attack?

How does stress increase risk for stroke, heart attack?

Scientists have shown that anger, anxiety, and depression not only affect the functioning of the heart, but also increase the risk for heart disease. Stroke and heart attacks are the end products of progressive damage to blood vessels supplying the heart and brain, a process called atherosclerosis Continue reading

Hospital observation units could save the health care system $3.1 billion

Hospital observation units could save the health care system $3.1 billion

ScienceDaily (Sep. 28, 2012) — New research suggests that maximizing the potential of observation units in hospitals could result in significant cost savings for the both the hospital and the healthcare system. Continue reading

Prostate ‘growth’ gene identified

Prostate ‘growth’ gene identified

3 August 2012 Last updated at 20:13 ET Scientists from Edinburgh University have pinpointed a gene they say could lead to improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. The team studied genes that control the formation of the prostate gland and identified one known as Decorin Continue reading

Living alone associated with higher risk of mortality, cardiovascular death

Living alone associated with higher risk of mortality, cardiovascular death

ScienceDaily (June 18, 2012) — Living alone was associated with an increased risk of death and cardiovascular death in an international study of stable outpatients at risk of or with arterial vascular disease (such as coronary disease or peripheral vascular disease), according to a report published Online First by Archives of Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication. Social isolation may be associated with poor health consequences, and the risk associated with living alone is relevant because about 1 in 7 American adults lives alone. Continue reading

Antibodies are not required for immunity against some viruses

Antibodies are not required for immunity against some viruses

ScienceDaily (Mar. 1, 2012) — A new study turns the well established theory that antibodies are required for antiviral immunity upside down and reveals that an unexpected partnership between the specific and non-specific divisions of the immune system is critical for fighting some types of viral infections. Continue reading

Nanoparticle trick ‘boosts jabs’

Nanoparticle trick ‘boosts jabs’

22 January 2012 Last updated at 13:01 ET Tiny capsules engineered to mimic part of the body’s immune system could strengthen its response to vaccines, say researchers. The nanoparticles, described in the journal Nature Materials, are a message sent from cells in the skin to warn of a threat. Continue reading