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Tag Archives: Physiology

Mom’s diet mirrors child’s food allergies

Mom’s diet mirrors child’s food allergies

A long-term study evaluating maternal diet’s impact on food allergy in later life is expected to uncover causes of allergy in children. About 20 million Europeans are subject to food allergies. Continue reading

Development of new cell models that report circadian clock function

Development of new cell models that report circadian clock function

Researchers at the University of Memphis and University of Pennsylvania report the development of robust new liver and fat cell models that report circadian clock function. These models are amenable to high throughput drug screening and could be used to find promising small molecules to resynchronize or help body clocks function normally. The consequences of modern life, eating and staying up later, shift work, cell phone addiction, and travel across time zones, all disturb internal clocks. Continue reading

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. The participants, each of whom had been paralyzed for more than two years, were able to voluntarily flex their toes, ankles, and knees while the stimulator was active, and the movements were enhanced over time when combined with physical rehabilitation. Researchers involved in the study say the therapy has the potential to change the prognosis of people with paralysis even years after injury. Continue reading

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. Continue reading

Race now or later? Calculating best time to compete after altitude training

Race now or later? Calculating best time to compete after altitude training

Date: April 3, 2014 Source: American Physiological Society (APS) Summary: A number of studies focus on the optimal time to begin altitude training before competition, but few address the best time to come down from altitude and how long athletes should wait to reacclimatize before competing. Researchers search for the answers in the new review article. Altitude training is a popular practice used by elite athletes to improve endurance in competitions, such as marathons and cycling races, that take place at sea level. Continue reading

Patient stem cells help identify common problem in ALS

Patient stem cells help identify common problem in ALS

Harvard stem cell scientists have discovered that a recently approved medication for epilepsy may possibly be a meaningful treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — Lou Gehrig’s disease, a uniformly fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The researchers are now collaborating with Massachusetts General Hospital to design an initial clinical trial testing the safety of the treatment in ALS patients. The investigators all caution that a great deal needs to be done to assure the safety and efficacy of the treatment in ALS patients, before physicians should start offering it Continue reading

Body odor changes following vaccination

Body odor changes following vaccination

Our understanding of the role of body odor in conveying personal information continues to grow. Continue reading

‘Mini heart’ invented to help return venous blood

‘Mini heart’ invented to help return venous blood

George Washington University (GW) researcher Narine Sarvazyan, Ph.D., has invented a new organ to help return blood flow from veins lacking functional valves. A rhythmically contracting cuff made of cardiac muscle cells surrounds the vein acting as a ‘mini heart’ to aid blood flow through venous segments. The cuff can be made of a patient’s own adult stem cells, eliminating the chance of implant rejection Continue reading

Fast and reliable: New mechanism for speedy transmission in basket cells discovered

Fast and reliable: New mechanism for speedy transmission in basket cells discovered

In his third major research paper since December 2013, IST Austria Professor Peter Jonas together with his collaborator, postdoc Hua Hu, identifies a new subcellular mechanism for reliable, fast transmission in the so-called basket cells of the brain. The results will be published on the website of Nature Neuroscience on March 23, 2014. IST Austria president Thomas Henzinger expressed his delight: “This is an extraordinary streak of publications in major journals which once more emphasizes the outstanding work of Peter Jonas and his group Continue reading

Microfluidic device with artificial arteries measures drugs’ influence on blood clotting

Microfluidic device with artificial arteries measures drugs’ influence on blood clotting

A new microfluidic method for evaluating drugs commonly used for preventing heart attacks has found that while aspirin can prevent dangerous blood clots in some at-risk patients, it may not be effective in all patients with narrowed arteries. The study, which involved 14 human subjects, used a device that simulated blood flowing through narrowed coronary arteries to assess effects of anti-clotting drugs. Continue reading