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HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children: More research needed

HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children: More research needed

Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. In a paper in The Lancet Infectious Diseases LSTM’s Professor Russell Stothard, working with colleagues in the department of Parasitology and researchers from Cape Western Reserve University, in Cleveland Ohio, University of Cambridge and the Royal Veterinary College looked at previous research into the joint burden of HIV/AIDS and schistosomiasis of children, and found that while disease-specific control interventions are continuing, potential synergies in the control efforts for the two diseases have not been investigated. Continue reading

‘Brain training’ overcomes tics in Tourette syndrome, study finds

‘Brain training’ overcomes tics in Tourette syndrome, study finds

Teenagers diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome (TS) were slower than their typically developing peers when asked to perform a task that involved them simply moving their eyes to look at targets. However, they significantly outperformed their peers when the task was more demanding and required them to choose between looking at or away from targets. Continue reading

Functional brain imaging reliably predicts which vegetative patients have potential to recover consciousness

Functional brain imaging reliably predicts which vegetative patients have potential to recover consciousness

A functional brain imaging technique known as positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for determining which severely brain damaged individuals in vegetative states have the potential to recover consciousness, according to new research published in The Lancet . It is the first time that researchers have tested the diagnostic accuracy of functional brain imaging techniques in clinical practice Continue reading

Functional brain imaging reliably predicts which vegetative patients have potential to recover consciousness

Functional brain imaging reliably predicts which vegetative patients have potential to recover consciousness

A functional brain imaging technique known as positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for determining which severely brain damaged individuals in vegetative states have the potential to recover consciousness, according to new research published in The Lancet . It is the first time that researchers have tested the diagnostic accuracy of functional brain imaging techniques in clinical practice. “Our findings suggest that PET imaging can reveal cognitive processes that aren’t visible through traditional bedside tests, and could substantially complement standard behavioural assessments to identify unresponsive or “vegetative” patients who have the potential for long-term recovery,” says study leader Professor Steven Laureys from the University of Liége in Belgium Continue reading

New therapy helps to improve stereoscopic vision in stroke patients

New therapy helps to improve stereoscopic vision in stroke patients

Humans view the world through two eyes, but it is our brain that combines the images from each eye to form a single composite picture. If this function becomes damaged, impaired sight can be the result. Continue reading

Intelligent prosthetic liners could ease pain for lower limb amputees

Intelligent prosthetic liners could ease pain for lower limb amputees

A new device could help to relieve the pain and discomfort experienced by thousands of amputees as a result of poorly fitting replacement lower limbs. Researchers are developing a prototype of the world’s first prosthetic ‘intelligent’ liner with integrated pressure sensors, which could be available to NHS patients in as little as three years. The sensors for the device, invented by Dr Liudi Jiang and an interdisciplinary team at the University of Southampton, measure the pressure and pulling forces at the interface between a patient’s stump and socket of their prosthesis Continue reading

Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment. Continue reading

Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer: Genetic evidence supports role of gene family in cancer development

Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer: Genetic evidence supports role of gene family in cancer development

All cancer-causing processes leave a distinct mutational imprint or signature on the genomes of patients. Continue reading

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

A UK studyi investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease’s severity. The research, conducted by the King’s College Hospital Paediatric Liver Centre and the University of Surrey’s School of Biosciences and Medicine, and funded by the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation retrospectively analysed the medical records of 120 paediatric patients with NAFLD Continue reading

Impressive SVR12 data for once-daily combination to treat HCV genotype 1 patients

Impressive SVR12 data for once-daily combination to treat HCV genotype 1 patients

Results from three Phase III clinical trials (ION-1, ION-2 and ION-3) evaluating the investigational once-daily fixed-dose combination of the nucleotide analogue polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir (SOF) 400mg and the NS5A inhibitor ledipasvir (LDV) 90mg, with and without ribavirin (RBV), for the treatment of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have been presented at the International Liver CongressTM 2014. “With cure rates well in excess of 90% with as little as eight weeks of treatment for some patients, these data represent a significant advance in the race to develop a new, all-oral treatment for Hepatitis C,” said Professor Markus Peck-Radosavljevic, Secretary-General of the European Association for the Study of the Liver and Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Vienna, Austria. “The results of the ION studies demonstrated highly satisfactory cure rates with a fixed dose combination of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir among patients with genotype 1 HCV infection without the use of either injectable interferon, which causes miserable flu-like symptoms, or ribavirin, an antiviral pill associated with a variety of troublesome side effects, including anemia and rash,” Professor Peck-Radosavljevic continued Continue reading