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Cystic Fibrosis lung infection: Scientists open black box on bacterial growth

Cystic Fibrosis lung infection: Scientists open black box on bacterial growth

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have shown for the first time how bacteria can grow directly in the lungs of Cystic fibrosis patients, giving them the opportunity to get tremendous insights into bacteria behavior and growth in chronic infections. The study also discovered the bacterial growth in chronic lung infections among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was halted or slowed down by the immune cells. The researchers discovered the immune cells consumed all the oxygen and helped “suffocate” the bacteria, forcing the bacteria to switch to a much slower growth. Continue reading

Tailored ‘activity coaching’ by smartphone

Tailored ‘activity coaching’ by smartphone

Today’s smartphone user can obtain a lot of data about his or her health, thanks to built-in or separate sensors. Researcher Harm op den Akker of the University of Twente (CTIT Institute) now takes this health monitoring to a higher level. Continue reading

How a molecular Superman protects genome from damage

How a molecular Superman protects genome from damage

How many times have we seen Superman swoop down from the heavens and rescue a would-be victim from a rapidly oncoming train? It’s a familiar scenario, played out hundreds of times in the movies. But the dramatic scene is reenacted in real life every time a cell divides Continue reading

Modeling tumor dormancy: What makes a tumor switch from dormant to malignant?

Modeling tumor dormancy: What makes a tumor switch from dormant to malignant?

Cancer constantly wages war on the human body. Battles are won, lost or sometimes end in a stalemate Continue reading

Staph ‘gangs’ share nutrients during infection

Staph ‘gangs’ share nutrients during infection

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered. Like the individual members of a gang who might be relatively harmless alone, they turn deadly when they get together with their “friends.” The findings, reported Oct. 8 in Cell Host & Microbe , shed light on a long-standing question in infectious diseases and may inform new treatment strategies, said Eric Skaar, Ph.D., MPH, Ernest W Continue reading

Cadavers beat computers for learning anatomy

Cadavers beat computers for learning anatomy

Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications for health care. Cary Roseth, associate professor of educational psychology at Michigan State University, said the study suggests cadaver-based instruction should continue in undergraduate human anatomy, a gateway course to medical school, nursing and other health and medical fields. In the United States, most anatomy courses still emphasize the use of cadavers, although in many cases digital technologies supplement the instruction Continue reading

Treating sleep apnea in cardiac patients reduces hospital readmission

Treating sleep apnea in cardiac patients reduces hospital readmission

A study of hospitalized cardiac patients is the first to show that effective treatment with positive airway pressure therapy reduces 30-day hospital readmission rates and emergency department visits in patients with both heart disease and sleep apnea. The results underscore the importance of the “Stop the Snore” campaign of the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project, a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Sleep Research Society and other partners. Continue reading

Researchers look to exploit females’ natural resistance to infection

Researchers look to exploit females’ natural resistance to infection

Researchers have linked increased resistance to bacterial pneumonia in female mice to an enzyme activated by the female sex hormone estrogen. Females are naturally more resistant to respiratory infections than males. Now, an international team of scientists has shown that increased resistance to bacterial pneumonia in female mice is linked to the enzyme nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) Continue reading

Australians not prepared for ‘dying with dignity’: Report

Australians not prepared for ‘dying with dignity’: Report

The vast majority of Australians do not have a plan allowing them to ‘die with dignity,’ new research has found. Just 14 per cent of the population has an Advance Directive, or “living will,” detailing their end of life treatment and care preferences, according to an article led by QUT Australian Centre for Health Law Research director Professor Ben White. This research is from a joint University of Queensland, QUT and Victoria University study, supported by the Australian Research Council in partnership with seven public trustee organisations across Australia Continue reading

Molecular ‘breadcrumb trail’ that helps melanoma spread found

Molecular ‘breadcrumb trail’ that helps melanoma spread found

Cancer Researchers UK scientists have discovered that melanoma cells are drawn to follow the ‘trail’ of a naturally-occurring molecule in the body, which directs this serious type of skin cancer to spread, according to research published in PLOS Biology . The team at the Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute at the University of Glasgow, revealed that melanoma cells give themselves the ‘green light’ to move using the molecule — a type of fatty chemical called lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). This signal prompts them to travel and spread in the body. Continue reading