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Longitudinal report shows challenging reality of aging with an intellectual disability

Longitudinal report shows challenging reality of aging with an intellectual disability

A new report launched today by the Intellectual Disability Supplement to TILDA (The Irish Longitudinal Study on aging) conducted by academics from the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, has highlighted the serious, complex and unique health and social challenges facing Ireland’s intellectual disability population. The IDS-TILDA study is the first study of its kind in Europe and the only one in the world with the ability to compare the aging of people with intellectual disability directly with the general aging population. For the first time in history, people in Ireland with an intellectual disability are growing old in considerable numbers Continue reading

Ancient human genome from southern Africa throws light on our origins

Ancient human genome from southern Africa throws light on our origins

The skeleton of a man who lived 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tells us about ourselves as humans, and throws some light on our earliest common genetic ancestry. Continue reading

Customizing chemotherapy in lung cancer: New phase II data reported

Customizing chemotherapy in lung cancer: New phase II data reported

Measuring the expression levels of an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis can help predict the response of lung cancers to certain treatments, a Korean study has shown at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid. In a randomized phase II study, researchers showed that patients whose lung cancers expressed low levels of an enzyme called thymidylate synthase experienced a greater benefit from treatment with the combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin than those whose tumours expressed high levels. “Thymidylate synthase is one of the proteins that is targeted by pemetrexed which is the most widely used chemotherapeutic regimen in the treatment of non-squamous NSCLC,” explains study author Professor Myung-Ju Ahn, from the Section of Hematology-Oncology at Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Continue reading

Antibacterial resistance a cause for major concern, cystic fibrosis experts say

Antibacterial resistance a cause for major concern, cystic fibrosis experts say

World-leading cystic fibrosis experts, from Queen’s University Belfast, have called for greater research to address the major concern of antibacterial resistance. Professor Stuart Elborn, an international authority on respiratory medicine, said that more funding and further research are required into antibiotic resistance in order to improve patient outcomes for people with Cystic Fibrosis Continue reading

Brain chemical potential new hope in controlling Tourette Syndrome tics

Brain chemical potential new hope in controlling Tourette Syndrome tics

A chemical in the brain plays a vital role in controlling the involuntary movements and vocal tics associated with Tourette Syndrome (TS), a new study has shown. Continue reading

Celiac disease: A wriggly solution to a first-world problem

Celiac disease: A wriggly solution to a first-world problem

Australian researchers have achieved groundbreaking results in a clinical trial using hookworms to reduce the symptoms of celiac disease. The results are also good news for sufferers of other inflammatory conditions such as asthma and Crohn’s disease. In the small trial run over a year, 12 participants were each experimentally infected with 20 Necator americanus (hookworm) larvae. Continue reading

Celiac disease: A wriggly solution to a first-world problem

Celiac disease: A wriggly solution to a first-world problem

Australian researchers have achieved groundbreaking results in a clinical trial using hookworms to reduce the symptoms of celiac disease. Continue reading

Celiac disease: A wriggly solution to a first-world problem

Celiac disease: A wriggly solution to a first-world problem

Australian researchers have achieved groundbreaking results in a clinical trial using hookworms to reduce the symptoms of celiac disease. The results are also good news for sufferers of other inflammatory conditions such as asthma and Crohn’s disease Continue reading

Discovery may lead to better treatments for autoimmune diseases, bone loss

Discovery may lead to better treatments for autoimmune diseases, bone loss

Scientists have developed an approach to creating treatments for osteoporosis and autoimmune diseases that may avoid the risk of infection and cancer posed by some current medications. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis redesigned a molecule that controls immune cell activity, changing the molecule’s target and altering the effects of the signal it sends Continue reading

Perfectionism is a bigger than perceived risk factor in suicide: Psychology expert

Perfectionism is a bigger than perceived risk factor in suicide: Psychology expert

Perfectionism is a bigger risk factor in suicide than we may think, says York University Psychology Professor Gordon Flett, calling for closer attention to its potential destructiveness, adding that clinical guidelines should include perfectionism as a separate factor for suicide risk assessment and intervention. “There is an urgent need for looking at perfectionism with a person-centred approach as an individual and societal risk factor, when formulating clinical guidelines for suicide risk assessment and intervention, as well as public health approaches to suicide prevention,” says Flett. More than one million people worldwide, including over 40,000 North Americans commit suicide on an annual basis, according to the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2012 estimation. Continue reading