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Discovery about wound healing key to understanding cell movement

Discovery about wound healing key to understanding cell movement

Research by a civil engineer from the University of Waterloo is helping shed light on the way wounds heal and may someday have implications for understanding how cancer spreads, as well as why certain birth defects occur. Professor Wayne Brodland is developing computational models for studying the mechanical interactions between cells. In this project, he worked with a team of international researchers who found that the way wounds knit together is more complex than we thought Continue reading

Promising Ebola virus treatment development: Crucial research conducted to advance medicine

Promising Ebola virus treatment development: Crucial research conducted to advance medicine

Laboratories at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) are investigating antibodies to fight Ebola virus, including the three antibodies recently used to treat two American health care workers infected with the Ebola virus. Continue reading

An embryonic cell’s fate sealed by speed of a signal

An embryonic cell’s fate sealed by speed of a signal

When embryonic cells get the signal to specialize the call can come quickly. Continue reading

Adolescent alcohol abuse disrupts transitions into early adulthood

Adolescent alcohol abuse disrupts transitions into early adulthood

Prior research has shown strong associations between adolescent alcohol abuse and adverse outcomes in early adulthood. A first-of-its-kind study of linkages between adolescent alcohol abuse and adverse adult outcomes has examined the influence of differences in familial background and shared genetics on this association; findings are consistent with a causal relationship between adolescent drinking and subsequent alcohol-related adult problems that cannot be fully explained by shared genetic and environmental liabilities. Results will be published in the August 2014 online-only issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research and are currently available at Early View Continue reading

Anti-tank missile detector joins fight against malaria

Anti-tank missile detector joins fight against malaria

State-of-the-art military hardware could soon fight malaria, one of the most deadly diseases on the planet. Researchers at Monash University and the University of Melbourne have used an anti-tank Javelin missile detector, more commonly used in warfare to detect the enemy, in a new test to rapidly identify malaria parasites in blood. Scientists say the novel idea, published in the journal Analyst , could set a new gold standard for malaria testing Continue reading

Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis

Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis

Scientists have designed a new self-assembling nanoparticle that targets tumours, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier. The new nanoparticle, developed by researchers at Imperial College London, boosts the effectiveness of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanning by specifically seeking out receptors that are found in cancerous cells Continue reading

Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis

Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis

Scientists have designed a new self-assembling nanoparticle that targets tumours, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier. The new nanoparticle, developed by researchers at Imperial College London, boosts the effectiveness of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanning by specifically seeking out receptors that are found in cancerous cells. The nanoparticle is coated with a special protein, which looks for specific signals given off by tumours, and when it finds a tumour it begins to interact with the cancerous cells. Continue reading

3D printed anatomy to mark a new era for medical training

3D printed anatomy to mark a new era for medical training

The creators of a unique kit containing anatomical body parts produced by 3D printing say it will revolutionize medical education and training, especially in countries where cadaver use is problematical. Continue reading

Smell and eye tests show potential to detect Alzheimer’s early

Smell and eye tests show potential to detect Alzheimer’s early

A decreased ability to identify odors might indicate the development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease, while examinations of the eye could indicate the build-up of beta-amyloid, a protein associated with Alzheimer’s, in the brain, according to the results of four research trials reported today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference® 2014 (AAIC® 2014) in Copenhagen. In two of the studies, the decreased ability to identify odors was significantly associated with loss of brain cell function and progression to Alzheimer’s disease. In two other studies, the level of beta-amyloid detected in the eye (a) was significantly correlated with the burden of beta-amyloid in the brain and (b) allowed researchers to accurately identify the people with Alzheimer’s in the studies. Continue reading

Exercise is the best medicine, study shows

Exercise is the best medicine, study shows

Women would benefit from being prescribed exercise as medicine, according to a QUT study that revealed moderate to high intensity activity is essential to reducing the risk of death in older women. Continue reading