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Tag Archives: professor

Pathways that direct immune system to turn ‘on’ or ‘off’ found

Pathways that direct immune system to turn ‘on’ or ‘off’ found

A key discovery explaining how components of the immune system determine whether to activate or to suppress the immune system, made by Kelvin Lee, MD, Professor of Oncology and Co-Leader of the Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy Program at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI), and colleagues led to published findings being selected as the “Paper of the Week” by the Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC). Continue reading

Blood test identifies brain damage from concussion in ice hockey

Blood test identifies brain damage from concussion in ice hockey

Half way into last year’s season, 35 of 288 players in the Swedish Hockey League had already had a concussion. Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy, who surveyed all of the players in the league’s 12 clubs, have now developed a method that can show just an hour after the injury how severe the concussion is, if there is a risk of long-term symptoms and about when the player can return to the game. Between September and December of the 2012/2013 season alone, 35 of 288 players in the Swedish Hockey League (SHL) had had a concussion — in three cases, it was so severe that the player was knocked unconscious Continue reading

Stumbling fruit flies lead scientists to discover gene essential for sensing joint position

Stumbling fruit flies lead scientists to discover gene essential for sensing joint position

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered an important mechanism underlying sensory feedback that guides balance and limb movements. The finding, which the TSRI team uncovered in fruit flies, centers on a gene and a type of nerve cell required for detection of leg-joint angles Continue reading

Africans’ ability to digest milk linked to spread of cattle raising

Africans’ ability to digest milk linked to spread of cattle raising

Babies are born with the ability to digest lactose, the sugar found in milk, but most humans lose this ability after infancy because of declining levels of the lactose-digesting enzyme lactase. People who maintain high levels of lactase reap the nutritive benefits of milk, however, offering a potential evolutionary advantage to lactase persistence, or what is commonly known as lactose tolerance. A new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers — constituting the largest examination ever of lactase persistence in geographically diverse populations of Africans — investigated the genetic origins of this trait and offers support to the idea that the ability to digest milk was a powerful selective force in a variety of African populations which raised cattle and consumed the animals’ fresh milk. Continue reading

Africans’ ability to digest milk linked to spread of cattle raising

Africans’ ability to digest milk linked to spread of cattle raising

Babies are born with the ability to digest lactose, the sugar found in milk, but most humans lose this ability after infancy because of declining levels of the lactose-digesting enzyme lactase. People who maintain high levels of lactase reap the nutritive benefits of milk, however, offering a potential evolutionary advantage to lactase persistence, or what is commonly known as lactose tolerance. A new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers — constituting the largest examination ever of lactase persistence in geographically diverse populations of Africans — investigated the genetic origins of this trait and offers support to the idea that the ability to digest milk was a powerful selective force in a variety of African populations which raised cattle and consumed the animals’ fresh milk. Continue reading

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

Scientists from the UK and Australia have created a mouse that expresses a fluorescing ‘biosensor’ in every cell of its body, allowing diseased cells and drugs to be tracked and evaluated in real time and in three dimensions. This biosensor mimics the action of a target molecule, in this case a protein known as ‘Rac’, which drives cell movement in many types of cancer. Rac behaves like a switch, oscillating on the molecular level between two states — active or inactive Continue reading

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

Scientists from the UK and Australia have created a mouse that expresses a fluorescing ‘biosensor’ in every cell of its body, allowing diseased cells and drugs to be tracked and evaluated in real time and in three dimensions. Continue reading

Excess sugar linked to cancer

Excess sugar linked to cancer

Feb. 1, 2013 — Sugars are needed to provide us with energy and in moderate amounts contribute to our well-being Continue reading