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New compound blocks ‘gatekeeper’ enzyme to kill malaria

New compound blocks ‘gatekeeper’ enzyme to kill malaria

Melbourne researchers are homing in on a new target for malaria treatment, after developing a compound that blocks the action of a key ‘gatekeeper’ enzyme essential for malaria parasite survival. The compound, called WEHI-916, is the first step toward a new class of antimalarial drugs that could cure and prevent malaria infections caused by all species of the parasite, including those resistant to existing drugs Continue reading

Using geometry, researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to organize themselves

Using geometry, researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to organize themselves

About seven days after conception, something remarkable occurs in the clump of cells that will eventually become a new human being. Continue reading

Body odor reveals malarial infection

Body odor reveals malarial infection

An infection with malaria pathogens changes the scent of infected mice, making those infected more attractive to mosquitoes. These are the findings of a team of researchers from ETH Zurich and Pennsylvania State University in a new study. Continue reading

Cetuximab or bevacizumab with combi chemo equivalent in KRAS wild-type MCRC

Cetuximab or bevacizumab with combi chemo equivalent in KRAS wild-type MCRC

For patients with KRAS wild-type untreated colorectal cancer, adding cetuximab or bevacizumab to combination chemotherapy offers equivalent survival, researchers said at the ESMO 16th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer in Barcelona. “The CALGB/SWOG 80405 trial was designed and formulated in 2005, and the rationale was simple: we had new drugs –bevacizumab and cetuximab– and the study was designed to determine if one was better than the other in first-line for patients with colon cancer,” said lead study author Alan P. Venook, distinguished Professor of Medical Oncology and Translational Research at the University of California, San Francisco, USA Continue reading

Noroviruses cause around a fifth of all cases of acute gastroenteritis worldwide

Noroviruses cause around a fifth of all cases of acute gastroenteritis worldwide

Noroviruses are a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (diarrhea and vomiting) across all age groups, responsible for almost a fifth (18%) of all cases worldwide. New estimates, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases , highlight the importance of developing norovirus vaccines, say the authors. “Including data from 48 countries and involving more than 187,000 gastroenteritis cases worldwide, these new estimates are the largest analysis of norovirus infection and disease to date Continue reading

Noroviruses cause around a fifth of all cases of acute gastroenteritis worldwide

Noroviruses cause around a fifth of all cases of acute gastroenteritis worldwide

Noroviruses are a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (diarrhea and vomiting) across all age groups, responsible for almost a fifth (18%) of all cases worldwide. New estimates, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases , highlight the importance of developing norovirus vaccines, say the authors Continue reading

Fighting parasitic infection inadvertently unleashes dormant virus

Fighting parasitic infection inadvertently unleashes dormant virus

Signals from the immune system that help repel a common parasite inadvertently can cause a dormant viral infection to become active again, a new study shows. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical significance of the finding, but researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis said the study helps illustrate how complex interactions between infectious agents and the immune system have the potential to affect illness. Continue reading

Cell division discovery could optimize timing of chemotherapy, explain some cancers

Cell division discovery could optimize timing of chemotherapy, explain some cancers

Research led by the University of Warwick’s Systems Biology Centre and Warwick Medical School in collaboration with groups in Nice and Rotterdam has been able to demonstrate how the cycle of cell division in mammalian cells synchronizes with the body’s own daily rhythm, its circadian clock. The study not only helps to explain why people with sustained disrupted circadian rhythms can be more susceptible to cancer, it may also help establish the optimal time of day to administer chemotherapy. Continue reading

Sweet, Sweet Straw: Scientists learn to produce sweetener from straw and fungi

Sweet, Sweet Straw: Scientists learn to produce sweetener from straw and fungi

The calorie free sweetener erythritol is widely used in Asia; it is also gaining popularity in Europe and America. At the Vienna University of Technology, a new cheap method has been developed to produce erythritol from straw with the help of mould fungi Continue reading

Young indoor tanning increases early risk of skin cancer

Young indoor tanning increases early risk of skin cancer

Dartmouth researchers have found that early exposure to the ultraviolet radiation lamps used for indoor tanning is related to an increased risk of developing basal cell carcinomas (BCC) at a young age. Their findings are reported in “Early-Onset Basal Cell Carcinoma and Indoor Tanning: A Population-Based Study,” a study that will be published in the July 2014 issue of Pediatrics . Since indoor tanning has become increasingly popular among adolescents and young adults, this research calls attention to the importance of counseling young people about the risk of indoor tanning Continue reading