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Tag Archives: public-health

Percent of uninsured Texans declined since September 2013

Percent of uninsured Texans declined since September 2013

The percentage of uninsured adults ages 18 to 64 in Texas declined from 24.8 to 23.5 between September 2013 and March 2014, according to a report released today by Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy and the Episcopal Health Foundation. The decrease in uninsured appears to be attributable to an increase in employer-sponsored health insurance. Continue reading

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity — the most “feminine” girls and the most “masculine” boys — are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. The most feminine teenage girls use tanning beds more frequently and are more likely to be physically inactive, while the most masculine teenage boys are more likely to use chewing tobacco and to smoke cigars, compared with their gender-nonconforming peers. The study, the first to look at cancer risk behaviors in teens based on their gender expression, appears online April 16, 2014 in the Journal of Adolescent Health Continue reading

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity — the most “feminine” girls and the most “masculine” boys — are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. The most feminine teenage girls use tanning beds more frequently and are more likely to be physically inactive, while the most masculine teenage boys are more likely to use chewing tobacco and to smoke cigars, compared with their gender-nonconforming peers Continue reading

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. Their results, published in the British Medical Journal , suggest that the youngest children from the most vulnerable populations benefit most and show significant improvements toward expected growth for their age and sex, particularly for weight. Malnutrition in early childhood, reflected in poor growth, is the cause of nearly half of all mortality worldwide in children less than five years old. Continue reading

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. Their results, published in the British Medical Journal , suggest that the youngest children from the most vulnerable populations benefit most and show significant improvements toward expected growth for their age and sex, particularly for weight Continue reading

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it’s normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition. The researchers from the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Health System offer the first long-term study of bleeding patterns in women of multiple race/ethnicities who were going through menopause Continue reading

Changes in processing, handling could reduce commercial fishing injuries

Changes in processing, handling could reduce commercial fishing injuries

Handling frozen fish caused nearly half of all injuries aboard commercial freezer-trawlers and about a quarter of the injuries on freezer-longliner vessels operating off the coast of Alaska, new research from Oregon State University shows. Many of those injuries and others aboard the two types of vessels could be prevented with the right interventions, and the research methods used in the study could help identify and reduce injuries and fatalities in other types of commercial fishing, said researcher Devin Lucas. Continue reading

Changes in processing, handling could reduce commercial fishing injuries

Changes in processing, handling could reduce commercial fishing injuries

Handling frozen fish caused nearly half of all injuries aboard commercial freezer-trawlers and about a quarter of the injuries on freezer-longliner vessels operating off the coast of Alaska, new research from Oregon State University shows. Many of those injuries and others aboard the two types of vessels could be prevented with the right interventions, and the research methods used in the study could help identify and reduce injuries and fatalities in other types of commercial fishing, said researcher Devin Lucas. Continue reading

Severe sleep apnea linked to increased risk of stroke, cancer, death

Severe sleep apnea linked to increased risk of stroke, cancer, death

A new study shows that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death. Results of the 20-year follow-up study show that people with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were four times more likely to die (hazard ratio = 4.2), nearly four times more likely to have a stroke (HR = 3.7), three times more likely to die from cancer (HR = 3.4), and 2.5 times more likely to develop cancer. Results were adjusted for potential confounding factors such as body mass index, smoking status, total cholesterol and blood pressure. Continue reading

Severe sleep apnea linked to increased risk of stroke, cancer, death

Severe sleep apnea linked to increased risk of stroke, cancer, death

A new study shows that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death. Results of the 20-year follow-up study show that people with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were four times more likely to die (hazard ratio = 4.2), nearly four times more likely to have a stroke (HR = 3.7), three times more likely to die from cancer (HR = 3.4), and 2.5 times more likely to develop cancer. Continue reading