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Tag Archives: public-health

Vitamin E intake critical during ‘the first 1,000 days’

Vitamin E intake critical during ‘the first 1,000 days’

Amid conflicting reports about the need for vitamin E and how much is enough, a new analysis published today suggests that adequate levels of this essential micronutrient are especially critical for the very young, the elderly, and women who are or may become pregnant. Continue reading

Ebola paper demonstrates disease transmission rate

Ebola paper demonstrates disease transmission rate

New research from Arizona State University and the University of Tokyo that analyzes transmission rates of Ebola in West African countries shows how rapidly the disease is spreading. Researchers Gerardo Chowell-Puente, ASU School of Human Evolution and Social Change Associate Professor, and Hiroshi Nishiura of the University of Tokyo found that transmission rates for each single case of Ebola consistently showed at least one new case of the disease being transmitted. Country-specific analysis of transmission rates in Liberia and Sierra Leone showed on average between one and two new cases for every existing case Continue reading

Ebola paper demonstrates disease transmission rate

Ebola paper demonstrates disease transmission rate

New research from Arizona State University and the University of Tokyo that analyzes transmission rates of Ebola in West African countries shows how rapidly the disease is spreading. Researchers Gerardo Chowell-Puente, ASU School of Human Evolution and Social Change Associate Professor, and Hiroshi Nishiura of the University of Tokyo found that transmission rates for each single case of Ebola consistently showed at least one new case of the disease being transmitted. Country-specific analysis of transmission rates in Liberia and Sierra Leone showed on average between one and two new cases for every existing case Continue reading

Even small stressors may be harmful to men’s health, new research shows

Even small stressors may be harmful to men’s health, new research shows

Older men who lead high-stress lives, either from chronic everyday hassles or because of a series of significant life events, are likely to die earlier than the average for their peers, new research from Oregon State University shows. “We’re looking at long-term patterns of stress — if your stress level is chronically high, it could impact your mortality, or if you have a series of stressful life events, that could affect your mortality,” said Carolyn Aldwin, director of the Center for Healthy Aging Research in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at OSU Continue reading

Stigma as a barrier to mental health care

Stigma as a barrier to mental health care

Over 60 million Americans are thought to experience mental illness in a given year, and the impacts of mental illness are undoubtedly felt by millions more in the form of family members, friends, and coworkers. Despite the availability of effective evidence-based treatment, about 40% of individuals with serious mental illness do not receive care and many who begin an intervention fail to complete it. A new report, published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, investigates stigma as a significant barrier to care for many individuals with mental illness. Continue reading

Poor health habits linked to financial insecurity

Poor health habits linked to financial insecurity

Financial hardship, or feeling that one can’t make ends meet, may be more predictive of health risk behaviors than actual income levels for people with low-incomes, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Health Promotion . It’s well known that “the poorer you are, the less healthy you’re likely to be,” said lead author Amy Harley, Ph.D., MPH, associate professor of community and behavioral health promotion at the Zilber School of Public Health at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Continue reading

Healthy sleep duration linked to less sick time from work

Healthy sleep duration linked to less sick time from work

New research suggests that sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night is associated with the lowest risk of absence from work due to sickness. Continue reading

New tuberculosis blood test in children: reliable, highly specific

New tuberculosis blood test in children: reliable, highly specific

A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test (TAM-TB assay) is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children Continue reading

Challenges ahead in improving child health by increasing access to sanitation in India

Challenges ahead in improving child health by increasing access to sanitation in India

A study published in this week’s PLOS Medicine on large-scale rural sanitation programs in India highlights challenges in achieving sufficient access to latrines and reduction in open defecation to yield significant health benefits for young children. The researchers, led by Sumeet Patil from the School of Public Health, University of California at Berkeley, and the Network for Engineering and Economics Research and Management in Mumbai, India conducted a cluster randomised controlled trial in 80 rural villages in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh to measure the effect of India’s Total Sanitation campaign (an initiative to increase access to improved sanitation throughout rural India) on household latrine availability, defecation behaviors, and child health Continue reading

When a health risk is close to home, health care professionals base their positions on vaccines on their own emotions, personal experiences

When a health risk is close to home, health care professionals base their positions on vaccines on their own emotions, personal experiences

When a health risk gets closer to home, health care professionals base their positions on vaccines more on emotions and personal experiences than on scientific and analytical knowledge, according to a new study by the School of Public Health at the University of Haifa. Continue reading