List/Grid

Tag Archives: public-health

Stigma as a barrier to mental health care

Stigma as a barrier to mental health care

Over 60 million Americans are thought to experience mental illness in a given year, and the impacts of mental illness are undoubtedly felt by millions more in the form of family members, friends, and coworkers. Despite the availability of effective evidence-based treatment, about 40% of individuals with serious mental illness do not receive care and many who begin an intervention fail to complete it. A new report, published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, investigates stigma as a significant barrier to care for many individuals with mental illness. Continue reading

Poor health habits linked to financial insecurity

Poor health habits linked to financial insecurity

Financial hardship, or feeling that one can’t make ends meet, may be more predictive of health risk behaviors than actual income levels for people with low-incomes, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Health Promotion . It’s well known that “the poorer you are, the less healthy you’re likely to be,” said lead author Amy Harley, Ph.D., MPH, associate professor of community and behavioral health promotion at the Zilber School of Public Health at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Continue reading

Healthy sleep duration linked to less sick time from work

Healthy sleep duration linked to less sick time from work

New research suggests that sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night is associated with the lowest risk of absence from work due to sickness. Continue reading

New tuberculosis blood test in children: reliable, highly specific

New tuberculosis blood test in children: reliable, highly specific

A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test (TAM-TB assay) is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children Continue reading

Challenges ahead in improving child health by increasing access to sanitation in India

Challenges ahead in improving child health by increasing access to sanitation in India

A study published in this week’s PLOS Medicine on large-scale rural sanitation programs in India highlights challenges in achieving sufficient access to latrines and reduction in open defecation to yield significant health benefits for young children. The researchers, led by Sumeet Patil from the School of Public Health, University of California at Berkeley, and the Network for Engineering and Economics Research and Management in Mumbai, India conducted a cluster randomised controlled trial in 80 rural villages in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh to measure the effect of India’s Total Sanitation campaign (an initiative to increase access to improved sanitation throughout rural India) on household latrine availability, defecation behaviors, and child health Continue reading

When a health risk is close to home, health care professionals base their positions on vaccines on their own emotions, personal experiences

When a health risk is close to home, health care professionals base their positions on vaccines on their own emotions, personal experiences

When a health risk gets closer to home, health care professionals base their positions on vaccines more on emotions and personal experiences than on scientific and analytical knowledge, according to a new study by the School of Public Health at the University of Haifa. Continue reading

Salmonella ‘from single egg source’

Salmonella ‘from single egg source’

unable to retrieve full-text contentThe outbreak of salmonella in England is likely to have come from a single source of eggs, according to Public Health England. Continue reading

Salmonella ‘from single egg source’

Salmonella ‘from single egg source’

unable to retrieve full-text contentThe outbreak of salmonella in England is likely to have come from a single source of eggs, according to Public Health England. Continue reading

Seals and sea lions likely spread tuberculosis to humans

Seals and sea lions likely spread tuberculosis to humans

Tuberculosis is one of the most persistent and deadliest infectious diseases in the world, killing one to two million people each year. Scientists who study tuberculosis have long debated its origins Continue reading

Teen sleeplessness piles on risk for obesity

Teen sleeplessness piles on risk for obesity

Teenagers who don’t get enough sleep may wake up to worse consequences than nodding off during chemistry class. According to new research, risk of being obese by age 21 was 20 percent higher among 16-year-olds who got less than six hours of sleep a night, compared with their peers who slumbered more than eight hours. (The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends nine to ten hours of sleep for teenagers.) Researchers at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Public Health are the first to examine the effect of sleeplessness on obesity in teenagers over time, providing the strongest evidence yet that lack of sleep raises risk for an elevated BMI Continue reading