List/Grid

Tag Archives: reference

Rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis: Review completed

Rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis: Review completed

Researchers from the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group, co-ordinated through the editorial base in LSTM, conducted an independent review into the effectiveness of rapid diagnostic tests in diagnosing patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL), published in The Cochrane Library today. VL (or kala-azar) is caused by a parasite and results in fever, a large spleen and other health problems. Continue reading

Cryoprobes better than traditional forceps for obtaining certain lung biopsies

Cryoprobes better than traditional forceps for obtaining certain lung biopsies

Date: June 16, 2014 Source: Wiley Summary: Cryoprobes, which are tools that apply extreme cold to tissues, are better than conventional forceps for performing so-called transbronchial lung biopsies in patients who are being assessed for certain lung conditions, a randomized controlled trial has found. Continue reading

Higher health care cost burden of musculoskeletal conditions compared to other diseases

Higher health care cost burden of musculoskeletal conditions compared to other diseases

A new study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) highlights the increased health care costs associated with musculoskeletal conditions compared to other diseases. Health care costs were almost 50% higher for people with a musculoskeletal condition compared to any other singly occurring condition. This disparity remained high where two conditions co-existed, with health care costs still one third higher (36%) for those people with one of their two conditions musculoskeletal in nature, highlighting the significant impact of these diseases. Continue reading

Rules to cut carbon emissions also reduce air pollution harmful to people, environment

Rules to cut carbon emissions also reduce air pollution harmful to people, environment

Setting strong standards for climate-changing carbon emissions from power plants would provide an added bonus — reductions in other air pollutants that can make people sick; damage forests, crops, and lakes; and harm fish and wildlife. Continue reading

Toxicologists outline key health and environmental concerns associated with hydraulic fracturing

Toxicologists outline key health and environmental concerns associated with hydraulic fracturing

Date: May 9, 2014 Source: Society of Toxicology Summary: Since the rise in the use of hydraulic fracturing of shale to produce natural gas and oil, many have debated the merits and detractions of the practice. Scientists outline how toxicological sciences can be used to determine what risks may or may not be associated with fracking. Since the rise in the use of hydraulic fracturing of shale to produce natural gas and oil, scientists, politicians, industrialists, and others have debated the merits and detractions of the practice. Continue reading

Toxicologists outline key health and environmental concerns associated with hydraulic fracturing

Toxicologists outline key health and environmental concerns associated with hydraulic fracturing

Date: May 9, 2014 Source: Society of Toxicology Summary: Since the rise in the use of hydraulic fracturing of shale to produce natural gas and oil, many have debated the merits and detractions of the practice. Scientists outline how toxicological sciences can be used to determine what risks may or may not be associated with fracking. Since the rise in the use of hydraulic fracturing of shale to produce natural gas and oil, scientists, politicians, industrialists, and others have debated the merits and detractions of the practice. Continue reading

Around 60% of people who contemplate or attempt suicide do not receive treatment

Around 60% of people who contemplate or attempt suicide do not receive treatment

Date: May 1, 2014 Source: The Lancet Summary: The key psychological factors that may contribute to, or protect against, suicidal behavior include personality differences, cognitive factors, and negative life events such as serious physical illness, as well as current psychological treatments. Evidence suggests that about 60% of people struggling with suicidal thoughts or behavior do not receive any help, and, surprisingly, there is relatively little evidence for the effectiveness of treatments received by those who do. In this Review, published to coincide with the launch of The Lancet Psychiatry journal, Professor Rory O’Connor from the University of Glasgow and Professor Matthew K. Continue reading

Mortality risks of being overweight or obese are underestimated

Mortality risks of being overweight or obese are underestimated

New research by Andrew Stokes, a doctoral student in demography and sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, suggests that many obesity studies substantially underestimate the mortality risks associated with excess weight in the United States. His study, “Using Maximum Weight to Redefine Body Mass Index Categories in Studies of The Mortality Risks of Obesity,” was published in the March issue of the open-access journal Population Health Metrics Continue reading

Race now or later? Calculating best time to compete after altitude training

Race now or later? Calculating best time to compete after altitude training

Date: April 3, 2014 Source: American Physiological Society (APS) Summary: A number of studies focus on the optimal time to begin altitude training before competition, but few address the best time to come down from altitude and how long athletes should wait to reacclimatize before competing. Researchers search for the answers in the new review article. Altitude training is a popular practice used by elite athletes to improve endurance in competitions, such as marathons and cycling races, that take place at sea level. Continue reading

Marriage linked to lower heart risks in study of more than 3.5 million adults

Marriage linked to lower heart risks in study of more than 3.5 million adults

People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The relationship between marriage and lower odds of vascular diseases is especially pronounced before age 50 Continue reading