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Insisting only on randomised controlled trials for Ebola treatments unethical, impractical, say leading health experts

Insisting only on randomised controlled trials for Ebola treatments unethical, impractical, say leading health experts

Date: October 10, 2014 Source: The Lancet Summary: Leading health experts urge the deployment of alternative trial designs to fast-track the evaluation of new Ebola treatments. Senior health professionals and medical ethicists, from Africa, Europe, and USA, argue that although randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide robust evidence in most circumstances, the lack of effective treatment options for Ebola, high mortality with the current standard of care, and the paucity of effective health care systems in the affected regions means that alternative trial designs need to be considered. Continue reading

Insisting only on randomised controlled trials for Ebola treatments unethical, impractical, say leading health experts

Insisting only on randomised controlled trials for Ebola treatments unethical, impractical, say leading health experts

Date: October 10, 2014 Source: The Lancet Summary: Leading health experts urge the deployment of alternative trial designs to fast-track the evaluation of new Ebola treatments. Senior health professionals and medical ethicists, from Africa, Europe, and USA, argue that although randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide robust evidence in most circumstances, the lack of effective treatment options for Ebola, high mortality with the current standard of care, and the paucity of effective health care systems in the affected regions means that alternative trial designs need to be considered. Continue reading

Prenatal BPA exposure associated with diminished lung function in children

Prenatal BPA exposure associated with diminished lung function in children

Date: October 6, 2014 Source: The JAMA Network Journals Summary: Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A, a common chemical used in some plastics, appears to be inconsistently associated with diminished lung function and the development of persistent wheeze in children. Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA, a common chemical used in some plastics) appears to be inconsistently associated with diminished lung function and the development of persistent wheeze in children, write Adam J Continue reading

Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles had lower failure-to-rescue rates

Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles had lower failure-to-rescue rates

Date: October 1, 2014 Source: The JAMA Network Journals Summary: Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles, also known as high hospital care intensity, had lower rates of patients dying from a major complication but longer hospitalizations. Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles, also known as high hospital care intensity (HCI), had lower rates of patients dying from a major complication (failure to rescue) but longer hospitalizations, writes Kyle H Continue reading

Intermittent montelukast in children aged 10 months to 5 years with wheeze

Intermittent montelukast in children aged 10 months to 5 years with wheeze

Date: September 8, 2014 Source: The Lancet Summary: This study of 1,358 children investigated whether intermittent montelukast — a drug widely used to treat wheeze and other asthmatic symptoms — compared with placebo, reduced wheezing episodes in children aged 10 months to 5 years, and whether patient outcome differed according to genotype. This study of 1358 children investigated whether intermittent montelukast (a drug widely used to treat wheeze and other asthmatic symptoms) compared with placebo, reduced wheezing episodes in children aged 10 months to 5 years, and whether patient outcome differed according to genotype. Study authors found that intermittent montelukast only reduced wheezing episodes in children with arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene promoter 5/5, a gene that has previously been associated with a better response to montelukast in adults Continue reading

First study of brain activation in MS using fNIRS

First study of brain activation in MS using fNIRS

Using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), Kessler Foundation researchers have shown differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. This is the first MS study in which brain activation was studied using fNIRS while participants performed a cognitive task Continue reading

When it comes to how pizza looks, cheese matters

When it comes to how pizza looks, cheese matters

Date: August 21, 2014 Source: Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Summary: Most consumers have an idea what they want their pizza slice to look like. Continue reading

Impact of race, ethnicity in motor complete spinal cord injury

Impact of race, ethnicity in motor complete spinal cord injury

Researchers have published a study examining racial and ethnic influences in the outcomes of patients with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). The article, “Racial and ethnic disparities in functioning at discharge and follow-up among patients with motor complete SCI,” was published online ahead of print on August 2 by the Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation . Findings included small but significant differences in self-care and mobility at discharge; no differences were apparent at 1-year followup. Continue reading

Mental Health Disparities Higher for Older African American Adults

Mental Health Disparities Higher for Older African American Adults

Date: August 12, 2014 Source: Taylor & Francis Summary: A new, revealing literature review suggests that older African American adults are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, anxiety, and dementia than others. The study reviews the mental health issues among the rapidly growing African American older adult population Continue reading