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Tag Archives: Research

Campaign to reduce firearm suicide wins support among firearm retailers in New Hampshire

Campaign to reduce firearm suicide wins support among firearm retailers in New Hampshire

Nearly half (48%) of firearm retailers in New Hampshire displayed materials from a firearm suicide prevention campaign generated by a coalition of gun owners and public health professionals, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. It is the first collaboration between firearm retailers and public health professionals around suicide prevention. The study appeared online October 28, 2014 in Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior . Continue reading

Low carb, high fat diets may reduce seizures in tough-to-treat epilepsy

Low carb, high fat diets may reduce seizures in tough-to-treat epilepsy

Diets high in fat and low in carbohydrates, such as the ketogenic or modified Atkins diet, may reduce seizures in adults with tough-to-treat epilepsy, according to a review of the research published in the October 29, 2014, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Epilepsy is a nervous system disorder in which the nerve cells in the brain work abnormally, causing seizures. About 50 million people have epilepsy worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Continue reading

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel consisting of short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA. These carbon nanotube “porins” have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications. Continue reading

Clean smell doesn’t always mean clean air

Clean smell doesn’t always mean clean air

Some of the same chemical reactions that occur in the atmosphere as a result of smog and ozone are actually taking place in your house while you are cleaning. A researcher in Drexel’s College of Engineering is taking a closer look at these reactions, which involve an organic compound -called limonene- that provides the pleasant smell of cleaning products and air fresheners. His research will help to determine what byproducts these sweet-smelling compounds are adding to the air while we are using them to remove germs and odors. Continue reading

In autoimmune diseases affecting millions, researchers pinpoint genetic risks, cellular culprits

In autoimmune diseases affecting millions, researchers pinpoint genetic risks, cellular culprits

Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans — ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis (MS), to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma — mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Now, a new study pinpoints the complex genetic origins for many of these diseases, a discovery that may lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to improved treatments Continue reading

Improving breast cancer chemo by testing patient’s tumors in a dish

Improving breast cancer chemo by testing patient’s tumors in a dish

One of the tragic realities of cancer is that the drugs used to treat it are highly toxic and their effectiveness varies unpredictably from patient to patient. However, a new “tumor-in-a-dish” technology is poised to change this reality by rapidly assessing how effective specific anti-cancer cocktails will be on an individual’s cancer before chemotherapy begins. A team of biomedical engineers at Vanderbilt University headed by Assistant Professor Melissa Skala has developed the technique, which uses fluorescence imaging to monitor the response of three-dimensional chunks of tumors removed from patients and exposed to different anti-cancer drugs. Continue reading

European consensus on methodological recommendations for clinical studies in rare cancers

European consensus on methodological recommendations for clinical studies in rare cancers

One out of every five new cancer patients is diagnosed with a rare cancer, yet the clinical evidence needed to effectively treat these rare cancer patients is scarce. Indeed, conventional cancer clinical trial methodologies require large numbers of patients who are difficult to accrue in the situation of rare cancers. Continue reading

Genetic variants influence a person’s response to statins found

Genetic variants influence a person’s response to statins found

A large analysis of over 40,000 individuals on statin treatment has identified two new genetic variants which influence how ‘bad’ cholesterol levels respond to statin therapy. Statins are widely prescribed to patients and have been shown to lower bad cholesterol levels by up to 55%, making them a highly effective method of reducing risk of heart disease. Continue reading

Lack of transcription factor FoxO1 triggers pulmonary hypertension

Lack of transcription factor FoxO1 triggers pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by uncontrolled division of cells in the blood vessel walls. As a result, the vessel walls become increasingly thick. Continue reading