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Tag Archives: Research

Sibling bullying linked to later depression, self-harm

Sibling bullying linked to later depression, self-harm

A new study has found that children who revealed they had been bullied by their brothers or sisters several times a week or more during early adolescence were twice as likely to report being clinically depressed as young adults. They were also twice as likely to say they had self-harmed within the previous year compared with those who had not been bullied. The findings, published in the journal Pediatrics , are the results of the first longitudinal study to investigate possible links between sibling bullying and clinical depression and self-harm in young adults. Continue reading

Shrink-wrapping spacesuits: Spacesuits of the future may resemble a streamlined second skin

Shrink-wrapping spacesuits: Spacesuits of the future may resemble a streamlined second skin

For future astronauts, the process of suiting up may go something like this: Instead of climbing into a conventional, bulky, gas-pressurized suit, an astronaut may don a lightweight, stretchy garment, lined with tiny, musclelike coils. She would then plug in to a spacecraft’s power supply, triggering the coils to contract and essentially shrink-wrap the garment around her body. Continue reading

Wireless sensor transmits tumor pressure

Wireless sensor transmits tumor pressure

The interstitial pressure inside a tumor is often remarkably high compared to normal tissues and is thought to impede the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents as well as decrease the effectiveness of radiation therapy. While medications exist that temporarily decrease tumor pressure, identifying the optimal window to initiate treatment — when tumor pressure is lowest — remains a challenge Continue reading

Sensing neuronal activity with light

Sensing neuronal activity with light

For years, neuroscientists have been trying to develop tools that would allow them to clearly view the brain’s circuitry in action — from the first moment a neuron fires to the resulting behavior in a whole organism. To get this complete picture, neuroscientists are working to develop a range of new tools to study the brain. Continue reading

Technique to model infections shows why live vaccines may be most effective

Technique to model infections shows why live vaccines may be most effective

Vaccines against Salmonella that use a live, but weakened, form of the bacteria are more effective than those that use only dead fragments because of the particular way in which they stimulate the immune system, according to research from the University of Cambridge published today. The BBSRC-funded researchers used a new technique that they have developed where several populations of bacteria, each of which has been individually tagged with a unique DNA sequence, are administered to the same host (in this case, a mouse) Continue reading

Melanoma risk found to have genetic determinant

Melanoma risk found to have genetic determinant

A leading Dartmouth researcher, working with The Melanoma Genetics Consortium, GenoMEL, an international research consortium, co-authored a paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that proves longer telomeres increase the risk of melanoma. “For the first time, we have established that the genes controlling the length of these telomeres play a part in the risk of developing melanoma,” said lead author of the study Mark Iles, PhD, School of Medicine at the University of Leeds (UK). Telomeres are a part of the genome that function like the plastic caps of your shoelaces, which prevent the laces from fraying Continue reading

Second look at glaucoma surgery: Anti-inflammatory medications after glaucoma laser surgery not helpful or necessary

Second look at glaucoma surgery: Anti-inflammatory medications after glaucoma laser surgery not helpful or necessary

New research led by Queen’s University professor Robert Campbell (Ophthalmology) has revealed using anti-inflammatory medications after glaucoma laser surgery is not helpful or necessary. Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness in the world and about 400,000 Canadians are afflicted with the disease, which is mainly caused by pressure within the eye being high enough to damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve is responsible for sending messages from the eye to the brain and is a vital part of vision. Continue reading

Americans rate losing eyesight as having greatest impact on their lives

Americans rate losing eyesight as having greatest impact on their lives

Many Americans across racial and ethnic groups describe losing eyesight as potentially having the greatest impact on their day-to-day life, more so than other conditions including: loss of limb, memory, hearing and speech (57% of African-Americans, 49% of non-Hispanic whites, 43% of Asians and 38% of Hispanics). When asked which disease or ailment is the worst that could happen to them, blindness ranked first among African-Americans followed by AIDS/HIV. Continue reading

Reduced energy density in foods can create healthier food environment, may help to reduce obesity

Reduced energy density in foods can create healthier food environment, may help to reduce obesity

On the heels of new research showing that 16 major food and beverage companies have collectively cut 6.4 trillion calories from U.S. food products, The Obesity Society (TOS) issues an official position statement pointing to the pervasive availability of foods high in calories per unit of weight, or energy density, as a contributing factor for weight gain and obesity. The Society goes further to urge food companies to test and market foods that will help individuals reduce the energy density in their diets and better manage body weight. Continue reading

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island recently published the results of an investigation into how we might better tailor therapy for ovarian cancer. The work comes out of the molecular therapeutic laboratory directed by Richard G. Moore, MD, of Women & Infants’ Program in Women’s Oncology. Continue reading