List/Grid

Tag Archives: Research

New way to diagnose malaria by detecting parasite’s waste in infected blood cells

New way to diagnose malaria by detecting parasite’s waste in infected blood cells

Over the past several decades, malaria diagnosis has changed very little. After taking a blood sample from a patient, a technician smears the blood across a glass slide, stains it with a special dye, and looks under a microscope for the Plasmodium parasite, which causes the disease. Continue reading

Antidepressants show potential for postoperative pain

Antidepressants show potential for postoperative pain

After a systematic review of clinical trials based on administering antidepressants for acute and chronic postsurgical pain, researchers have concluded that more trials are needed to determine whether these drugs should be prescribed for postsurgical pain on a regular basis. Dr. Ian Gilron, a professor and director of clinical pain research in the Department of Anesthesiology, and his team of seven researchers reviewed 15 trials to determine whether the use of antidepressants for pain relief post-surgery would work more effectively than painkillers such as opioids, local anesthetics, or acetaminophen. Continue reading

Preventing cancer from forming ‘tentacles’ stops dangerous spread

Preventing cancer from forming ‘tentacles’ stops dangerous spread

A new study from the research group of Dr. John Lewis at the University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB) and the Lawson Health Research Institute (London, ON) has confirmed that “invadopodia” play a key role in the spread of cancer. The study, published in Cell Reports , shows preventing these tentacle-like structures from forming can stop the spread of cancer entirely Continue reading

Evidence mounting that older adults who volunteer are happier, healthier

Evidence mounting that older adults who volunteer are happier, healthier

Older adults who stay active by volunteering are getting more out of it than just an altruistic feeling — they are receiving a health boost! A new study, led by the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences and published online this week in Psychological Bulletin , is the first to take a broad-brush look at all the available peer-reviewed evidence regarding the psychosocial health benefits of formal volunteering for older adults. Continue reading

Small molecule acts as on-off switch for nature’s antibiotic factory: Tells Streptomyces to either veg out or get busy

Small molecule acts as on-off switch for nature’s antibiotic factory: Tells Streptomyces to either veg out or get busy

Scientists have identified the developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces, a group of soil microbes that produce more than two-thirds of the world’s naturally derived antibiotic medicines. Their hope now would be to see whether it is possible to manipulate this switch to make nature’s antibiotic factory more efficient. Continue reading

Indoor mold poses health risk to asthma sufferers

Indoor mold poses health risk to asthma sufferers

Damp and mould in homes could pose a significant health risk to people with asthma according to a new study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. By critically reviewing the findings from 17 studies in eight different countries, the research has found that the presence of several types of mould can lead to breathing problems in asthma sufferers, as well as increasing the likelihood of developing the condition. The research has been conducted by a team at the University of Exeter Medical School and is the first time all of the information relating to mould and asthma has been gathered and analysed together. Continue reading

Avatars make the Internet sign to deaf people

Avatars make the Internet sign to deaf people

It is challenging for deaf people to learn a sound-based language, since they are physically not able to hear those sounds. Hence, most of them struggle with written language as well as with text reading and comprehension. Continue reading

Dosage of HIV drug may be ineffective for half of African-Americans

Dosage of HIV drug may be ineffective for half of African-Americans

Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc, a new study from Johns Hopkins suggests. Continue reading

Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance

Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas — the primary form of a deadly brain cancer — are resistant to drug therapy. The answer lies not in the DNA sequence of the tumor, but in its epigenetic signature Continue reading

Nurse anesthetist care not equal to physician anesthesiologist-led care, comprehensive evidence-based review finds

Nurse anesthetist care not equal to physician anesthesiologist-led care, comprehensive evidence-based review finds

A recent literature review by the Cochrane Collaboration found no scientific evidence that care provided by a nurse anesthetist is as safe and effective as patient-centered, physician-led anesthesia care, prompting the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA®) to call for further examination to measure patient safety and anesthesia care delivery. The review, “Physician anaesthetists versus non-physician providers of anaesthesia for surgical patients,” attempted to assess the safety and effectiveness of physician-led versus nurse-led anesthesia care delivery. While the authors stated intent that they “hoped that this review may lead to an increase in confidence in the skills of NPAs nurse anesthetists within the anaesthetic community,” the comprehensive analysis could not support this premise. Continue reading