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Tag Archives: Research

For an immune cell, microgravity mimics aging

For an immune cell, microgravity mimics aging

Telling someone to “act your age” is another way of asking him or her to behave better. Age, however, does not always bring improvements. Certain cells of the immune system tend to misbehave with age, leaving the elderly more vulnerable to illness Continue reading

Management of elderly patients with lung cancer

Management of elderly patients with lung cancer

Half of all patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer are 70 years of age or older, yet despite this high percentage, these elderly patients are not well represented in clinical trials. Therefore, the paucity of clinical data has made it difficult to reach evidence based clinical recommendations. In 2010, the EORTC Cancer in the Elderly Task Force and Lung Cancer Group along with the International Society for Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) wrote an expert opinion on managing treatment for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and now, in an article appearing in the Annal s of Oncology , they have updated their expert opinion. Continue reading

Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds

Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds

New therapies are needed to prevent and treat respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) — a potentially lethal respiratory infection that can severely affect infants, young children and the elderly. Despite a wide range of anti-RSV efforts, there are no vaccines or drugs on the market to effectively prevent or treat the infection. Now researchers at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, and the James A. Continue reading

Fighting malaria drug resistance: Scientists find new way

Fighting malaria drug resistance: Scientists find new way

An anti-malarial treatment that lost its status as the leading weapon against the deadly disease could be given a new lease of life, with new research indicating it simply needs to be administered differently. The findings could revive the use of the cheap anti-malarial drug chloroquine in treating and preventing the mosquito-bourne disease, which claims the lives of more than half a million people each year around the world. The parasite that causes malaria has developed resistance to chloroquine, but research carried out at the Australian National University (ANU) and Germany’s University of Heidelberg has shown that the parasite protein that causes resistance has an Achilles’ heel Continue reading

More effective kidney stone treatment, from macroscopic to nanoscale

More effective kidney stone treatment, from macroscopic to nanoscale

Researchers in France have hit on a novel method to help kidney stone sufferers ensure they receive the correct and most effective treatment possible. Kidney stones represent a major medical problem in the western and developing world. If left untreated, apart from being particularly painful, they can lead to renal failure and other complications. Continue reading

New technique detects microscopic diabetes-related eye damage

New technique detects microscopic diabetes-related eye damage

Indiana University researchers have detected new early-warning signs of the potential loss of sight associated with diabetes. This discovery could have far-reaching implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, potentially impacting the care of over 25 million Americans. “We had not expected to see such striking changes to the retinas at such early stages,” said Ann Elsner, professor and associate dean in the IU School of Optometry and lead author of the study. Continue reading

Key milestone for brown fat research with ground-breaking MRI scan

Key milestone for brown fat research with ground-breaking MRI scan

The first MRI scan to show ‘brown fat’ in a living adult could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity. Continue reading

HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children: More research needed

HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children: More research needed

Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. In a paper in The Lancet Infectious Diseases LSTM’s Professor Russell Stothard, working with colleagues in the department of Parasitology and researchers from Cape Western Reserve University, in Cleveland Ohio, University of Cambridge and the Royal Veterinary College looked at previous research into the joint burden of HIV/AIDS and schistosomiasis of children, and found that while disease-specific control interventions are continuing, potential synergies in the control efforts for the two diseases have not been investigated. Continue reading

‘Brain training’ overcomes tics in Tourette syndrome, study finds

‘Brain training’ overcomes tics in Tourette syndrome, study finds

Teenagers diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome (TS) were slower than their typically developing peers when asked to perform a task that involved them simply moving their eyes to look at targets. However, they significantly outperformed their peers when the task was more demanding and required them to choose between looking at or away from targets. Continue reading

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Everything we do — all of our movements, thoughts and feelings — are the result of neurons talking with one another, and recent studies have suggested that some of the conversations might not be all that private. Brain cells known as astrocytes may be listening in on, or even participating in, some of those discussions. But a new mouse study suggests that astrocytes might only be tuning in part of the time — specifically, when the neurons get really excited about something. Continue reading