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Tag Archives: Research

Team discovers how microbes build a powerful antibiotic

Team discovers how microbes build a powerful antibiotic

Researchers report in the journal Nature that they have made a breakthrough in understanding how a powerful antibiotic agent is made in nature. Continue reading

New methods for maintaining the quality of minimally processed potatoes for 14 days, without the use of sulphites

New methods for maintaining the quality of minimally processed potatoes for 14 days, without the use of sulphites

A graduate in Food Science and Technology, has proposed alternatives to the use of sulphites in potatoes, one of the main preservatives currently used and which, among other properties, prevents the browning that appears after peeling and/or cutting certain foods. Today, one speaks of fourth range or minimally processed products to refer to fresh fruit and vegetables that have been washed, cut up and packaged before they are marketed. Continue reading

In orbit or on Earth, implantable device will be commanded to release therapeutic drugs remotely

In orbit or on Earth, implantable device will be commanded to release therapeutic drugs remotely

Houston Methodist Research Institute scientists will receive about $1.25 million from the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space to develop an implantable device that delivers therapeutic drugs at a rate guided by remote control. Continue reading

‘Long tail’ thinking can help eliminate health disparities

‘Long tail’ thinking can help eliminate health disparities

“Long tail” thinking in public health might yield greater progress in eliminating health disparities, according to a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis Continue reading

Significant increase in type 1 diabetes rates among non-Hispanic white youth

Significant increase in type 1 diabetes rates among non-Hispanic white youth

The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study published today in the journal Diabetes . The study included data from more than 2 million children and adolescents living in diverse geographic regions of the United States. Continue reading

Real-time tracking system developed to monitor dangerous bacteria inside body

Real-time tracking system developed to monitor dangerous bacteria inside body

Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, Johns Hopkins researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with a class of dangerous Gram-negative bacteria. These increasingly drug-resistant bacteria are responsible for a range of diseases, including fatal pneumonias and various bloodstream or solid-organ infections acquired in and outside the hospital. “What we have produced is essentially a system that localizes the epicenter of infection and provides real-time tracking of bacterial activity, giving us rapid feedback on how the bacteria respond to antibiotics,” says principal investigator Sanjay Jain, M.D., an infectious disease specialist at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and director of the Center for Inflammation Imaging and Research at Johns Hopkins Continue reading

Hospital logs staggering 2.5 million alarms in just a month

Hospital logs staggering 2.5 million alarms in just a month

Following the study of a hospital that logged more than 2.5 million patient monitoring alarms in just one month, researchers at UC San Francisco have, for the first time, comprehensively defined the detailed causes as well as potential solutions for the widespread issue of alarm fatigue in hospitals. Their study is in the Oct. 22 issue of PLOS ONE and available online Continue reading

Fast modeling of cancer mutations

Fast modeling of cancer mutations

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming process. MIT researchers have now developed a new way to model the effects of these genetic mutations in mice Continue reading

How lymph nodes expand during disease

How lymph nodes expand during disease

CANCER RESEARCH UK and UCL scientists have discovered that the same specialised immune cells that patrol the body and spot infections also trigger the expansion of immune organs called lymph nodes, according to a study published in Nature . Continue reading

Competition keeps health-care costs low, U.S. researchers find

Competition keeps health-care costs low, U.S. researchers find

Medical practices in less competitive health-care markets charge more for services, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the National Bureau of Economic Research. The study, based on U.S Continue reading