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Tag Archives: researchers

Malaria parasites sense and react to mosquito presence to increase transmission

Malaria parasites sense and react to mosquito presence to increase transmission

Many pathogens are transmitted by insect bites. The abundance of vectors (as the transmitting insects are called) depends on seasonal and other environmental fluctuations. An article published on September 11thin PLOS Pathogens demonstrates that Plasmodium parasites react to mosquitoes biting their hosts, and that the parasite responses increase transmission to the mosquito vector. Continue reading

Intestinal bacteria needed for strong flu vaccine responses in mice

Intestinal bacteria needed for strong flu vaccine responses in mice

Mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have impaired antibody responses to seasonal influenza vaccination, researchers have found. Continue reading

Intestinal bacteria needed for strong flu vaccine responses in mice

Intestinal bacteria needed for strong flu vaccine responses in mice

Mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have impaired antibody responses to seasonal influenza vaccination, researchers have found. The findings suggest that antibiotic treatment before or during vaccination may impair responses to certain vaccines in humans Continue reading

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. A study in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology , the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), found that healthcare workers’ adherence to hand hygiene is better when other workers are nearby. “Social network effects, or peer effects, have been associated with smoking, obesity, happiness and worker productivity. Continue reading

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. A study in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology , the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), found that healthcare workers’ adherence to hand hygiene is better when other workers are nearby. “Social network effects, or peer effects, have been associated with smoking, obesity, happiness and worker productivity Continue reading

Re-analysis of clinical trial data can change conclusions in one-third of studies

Re-analysis of clinical trial data can change conclusions in one-third of studies

As many as one-third of previously published randomized clinical trials could be re-analyzed in ways that modify the conclusions of how many or what types of patients need to be treated, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. A culture that fails to encourage data sharing makes such re-analysis of the data extremely rare, the researchers said. They were able to identify only 37 published re-analyses over more than three decades of research. Continue reading

Intermittent montelukast in children aged 10 months to 5 years with wheeze

Intermittent montelukast in children aged 10 months to 5 years with wheeze

Date: September 8, 2014 Source: The Lancet Summary: This study of 1,358 children investigated whether intermittent montelukast — a drug widely used to treat wheeze and other asthmatic symptoms — compared with placebo, reduced wheezing episodes in children aged 10 months to 5 years, and whether patient outcome differed according to genotype. This study of 1358 children investigated whether intermittent montelukast (a drug widely used to treat wheeze and other asthmatic symptoms) compared with placebo, reduced wheezing episodes in children aged 10 months to 5 years, and whether patient outcome differed according to genotype. Study authors found that intermittent montelukast only reduced wheezing episodes in children with arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene promoter 5/5, a gene that has previously been associated with a better response to montelukast in adults Continue reading

Dynamic duo takes out cellular trash: Research finds how dead cells are removed from body

Dynamic duo takes out cellular trash: Research finds how dead cells are removed from body

In most of the tissues of the body, specialized immune cells are entrusted with the task of engulfing the billions of dead cells that are generated every day. When these garbage disposals don’t do their job, dead cells and their waste products rapidly pile up, destroying healthy tissue and leading to autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. Continue reading

Synthetic messenger boosts immune system

Synthetic messenger boosts immune system

When a pathogen attacks a healthy cell in the body, T lymphocytes are tasked with identifying and destroying the infected cell. Scientists know that they undergo a “training program” for this task in the lymph nodes or the spleen Continue reading

Bariatric surgical center accreditation improves patient survival, postop complications

Bariatric surgical center accreditation improves patient survival, postop complications

Patients who underwent weight loss operations in recent years, when most bariatric surgical centers were accredited, had fewer postoperative complications and were 2.3 times less likely to die in the hospital than patients who had bariatric procedures performed before a national movement toward facility accreditation was taking place, according to new study findings. Continue reading