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Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Brain development in schizophrenia strays from normal path

Brain development in schizophrenia strays from normal path

Schizophrenia is generally considered to be a disorder of brain development and it shares many risk factors, both genetic and environmental, with other neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and intellectual disability. The normal path for brain development is determined by the combined effects of a complex network of genes and a wide range of environmental factors. Continue reading

No innocent bystander: Cartilage contributes to arthritis

No innocent bystander: Cartilage contributes to arthritis

Melbourne researchers have discovered that cartilage plays an active role in the destruction and remodelling of joints seen in rheumatoid arthritis, rather than being an ‘innocent bystander’ as previously thought. Dr Tommy Liu, Professor Ian Wicks, Dr Kate Lawlor, Dr Ben Croker and colleagues from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute made the discovery while investigating the role of the protein SOCS3 in controlling inflammation during rheumatoid arthritis. The study was published in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatology Continue reading

Protein appears to protect against bone loss in arthritis

Protein appears to protect against bone loss in arthritis

A small protein named GILZ appears to protect against the bone loss that often accompanies arthritis and its treatment, researchers report. Arthritis as well as aging prompt the body to make more fat than bone, and the researchers have previously shown GILZ can restore a more youthful, healthy mix. It also tamps down inflammation, a major factor in arthritis. Continue reading

A meta-analysis of three types of peer norms and their relation with adolescent sexual behavior

A meta-analysis of three types of peer norms and their relation with adolescent sexual behavior

Researchers at Utrecht University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute collaborated on a meta-analysis of research on adolescent sexual behavior. The goal was to analyze how this behavior is related to adolescents’ perceptions of three types of sexual peer norms, including how sexually active their peers are, how much their peers would approve of being sexually active, or how much they feel pressured by their peers to have sex Continue reading

Simple method turns human skin cells into immune strengthening white blood cells

Simple method turns human skin cells into immune strengthening white blood cells

For the first time, scientists have turned human skin cells into transplantable white blood cells, soldiers of the immune system that fight infections and invaders. The work, done at the Salk Institute, could let researchers create therapies that introduce into the body new white blood cells capable of attacking diseased or cancerous cells or augmenting immune responses against other disorders. Continue reading

Malaria parasites sense and react to mosquito presence to increase transmission

Malaria parasites sense and react to mosquito presence to increase transmission

Many pathogens are transmitted by insect bites. The abundance of vectors (as the transmitting insects are called) depends on seasonal and other environmental fluctuations. An article published on September 11thin PLOS Pathogens demonstrates that Plasmodium parasites react to mosquitoes biting their hosts, and that the parasite responses increase transmission to the mosquito vector. Continue reading

Intestinal bacteria needed for strong flu vaccine responses in mice

Intestinal bacteria needed for strong flu vaccine responses in mice

Mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have impaired antibody responses to seasonal influenza vaccination, researchers have found. Continue reading

Intestinal bacteria needed for strong flu vaccine responses in mice

Intestinal bacteria needed for strong flu vaccine responses in mice

Mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have impaired antibody responses to seasonal influenza vaccination, researchers have found. The findings suggest that antibiotic treatment before or during vaccination may impair responses to certain vaccines in humans Continue reading