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Tag Archives: researchers

Hot nanoparticles for cancer treatments

Hot nanoparticles for cancer treatments

Nanoparticles have a great deal of potential in medicine: for diagnostics, as a vehicle for active substances or a tool to kill off tumors using heat. Continue reading

Path to safer drugs for heart disease, cancer found by researchers

Path to safer drugs for heart disease, cancer found by researchers

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators may have found a way to solve a problem that has plagued a group of drugs called ligand-mimicking integrin inhibitors, which have the potential to treat conditions ranging from heart attacks to cancer metastasis. In a Nature Structural & Molecular Biology paper receiving advance online publication, the researchers provide a structural basis for the design of new and safer integrin inhibitors. Integrins are receptor proteins found on the surface of cells that determine whether or not cells adhere to adjacent cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix Continue reading

Obesity: Not just what you eat

Obesity: Not just what you eat

Over 35 percent of American adults and 17 percent of American children are considered obese, according to the latest survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Associated with diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and even certain types of cancer, obesity places a major burden on the health care system and economy. It’s usually treated through a combination of diet, nutrition, exercise, and other techniques. Continue reading

Low doses of antianxiety drugs rebalance autistic brain, study shows

Low doses of antianxiety drugs rebalance autistic brain, study shows

New research in mice suggests that autism is characterized by reduced activity of inhibitory neurons and increased activity of excitatory neurons in the brain, but balance can be restored with low doses of a well-known class of drugs currently used in much higher doses to treat anxiety and epileptic seizures. The findings, which are reported in the March 19th issue of the Cell Press journal Neuron , point to a new therapeutic approach to managing autism. “These are very exciting results because they suggest that existing drugs — called benzodiazepines — might be useful in treatment of the core deficits in autism,” says senior author Dr Continue reading

Low doses of antianxiety drugs rebalance autistic brain, study shows

Low doses of antianxiety drugs rebalance autistic brain, study shows

New research in mice suggests that autism is characterized by reduced activity of inhibitory neurons and increased activity of excitatory neurons in the brain, but balance can be restored with low doses of a well-known class of drugs currently used in much higher doses to treat anxiety and epileptic seizures. The findings, which are reported in the March 19th issue of the Cell Press journal Neuron , point to a new therapeutic approach to managing autism. “These are very exciting results because they suggest that existing drugs — called benzodiazepines — might be useful in treatment of the core deficits in autism,” says senior author Dr Continue reading

Fighting antibiotic resistance with ‘molecular drill bits’

Fighting antibiotic resistance with ‘molecular drill bits’

In response to drug-resistant “superbugs” that send millions of people to hospitals around the world, scientists are building tiny, “molecular drill bits” that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls. Continue reading

Positive memories of exercise spur future workouts

Positive memories of exercise spur future workouts

Getting motivated to exercise can be a challenge, but new research from the University of New Hampshire shows that simply remembering a positive memory about exercise may be just what it takes to get on the treadmill. This is the first study to explore how positive memories can influence future workouts. Continue reading

Time out: Spanking babies is surprisingly common, U.S. study finds

Time out: Spanking babies is surprisingly common, U.S. study finds

The same hands that parents use to lovingly feed, clothe and bathe their babies are also commonly used to spank their bundles of joy. A new University of Michigan study found that 30 percent of 1-year-old children were spanked at least once in the past month by their mother, father or both parents Continue reading

Time out: Spanking babies is surprisingly common, U.S. study finds

Time out: Spanking babies is surprisingly common, U.S. study finds

The same hands that parents use to lovingly feed, clothe and bathe their babies are also commonly used to spank their bundles of joy. A new University of Michigan study found that 30 percent of 1-year-old children were spanked at least once in the past month by their mother, father or both parents Continue reading

Heart cells respond to stiff environments

Heart cells respond to stiff environments

Proteins associated with the regulation of organ size and shape have been found to respond to the mechanics of the microenvironment in ways that specifically affect the decision of adult cardiac stem cells to generate muscular or vascular cells. Cell development for specific functions — so-called cell differentiation — is crucial for maintaining healthy tissue and organs. Two proteins in particular — the Yes-associated protein (YAP) and WW domain-containing transcription regulator protein 1 (WWTR1 or TAZ) — have been linked with control of cell differentiation in the tissues of the lymphatic, circulatory, intestinal and neural systems, as well as regulating embryonic stem cell renewal Continue reading