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Tag Archives: Science

New biomedical implants heal bones faster, focus on personalized medicine

New biomedical implants heal bones faster, focus on personalized medicine

A major success in developing new biomedical implants with the ability to accelerate bone healing has been reported by a group of scientists from the Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Malaya. This stems from a project partly funded by HIR and also involves Mr. Continue reading

Sensing neuronal activity with light

Sensing neuronal activity with light

For years, neuroscientists have been trying to develop tools that would allow them to clearly view the brain’s circuitry in action — from the first moment a neuron fires to the resulting behavior in a whole organism. To get this complete picture, neuroscientists are working to develop a range of new tools to study the brain. Continue reading

Technique to model infections shows why live vaccines may be most effective

Technique to model infections shows why live vaccines may be most effective

Vaccines against Salmonella that use a live, but weakened, form of the bacteria are more effective than those that use only dead fragments because of the particular way in which they stimulate the immune system, according to research from the University of Cambridge published today. The BBSRC-funded researchers used a new technique that they have developed where several populations of bacteria, each of which has been individually tagged with a unique DNA sequence, are administered to the same host (in this case, a mouse) Continue reading

Certain gut bacteria may induce metabolic changes following exposure to artificial sweeteners

Certain gut bacteria may induce metabolic changes following exposure to artificial sweeteners

Artificial sweeteners — promoted as aids to weight loss and diabetes prevention — could actually hasten the development of glucose intolerance and metabolic disease, and they do so in a surprising way: by changing the composition and function of the gut microbiota — the substantial population of bacteria residing in our intestines. These findings, the results of experiments in mice and humans, were published September 17 in Nature . Continue reading

More cheese, please! News study shows dairy is good for your metabolic health

More cheese, please! News study shows dairy is good for your metabolic health

Dairy is considered part of a healthy diet and dietary guidelines recommend the daily consumption of 2-4 portions of milk-based products such as milk, yogurt, cheese, cream and butter. It’s well known that dairy products contain calcium and minerals good for bones, but new research has shown that dairy consumption may also have beneficial effects on metabolic health and can reduce risk of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. Continue reading

Poor body size judgement can lead to increased tolerance of obesity

Poor body size judgement can lead to increased tolerance of obesity

Size is relative, especially to people who tend to be on the heavy side. Researchers at the Columbia University Medical Center in the US found that seven in every ten obese adults underestimate how much someone weighs. People of normal weight make this mistake much less often Continue reading

New producer of crucial vitamin B12 discovered

New producer of crucial vitamin B12 discovered

New research has determined that a single group of micro-organisms may be responsible for much of the world’s vitamin B 12 production in the oceans, with implications for the global carbon cycle and climate change. Continue reading

Intermittent montelukast in children aged 10 months to 5 years with wheeze

Intermittent montelukast in children aged 10 months to 5 years with wheeze

Date: September 8, 2014 Source: The Lancet Summary: This study of 1,358 children investigated whether intermittent montelukast — a drug widely used to treat wheeze and other asthmatic symptoms — compared with placebo, reduced wheezing episodes in children aged 10 months to 5 years, and whether patient outcome differed according to genotype. This study of 1358 children investigated whether intermittent montelukast (a drug widely used to treat wheeze and other asthmatic symptoms) compared with placebo, reduced wheezing episodes in children aged 10 months to 5 years, and whether patient outcome differed according to genotype. Study authors found that intermittent montelukast only reduced wheezing episodes in children with arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene promoter 5/5, a gene that has previously been associated with a better response to montelukast in adults Continue reading

Stigma as a barrier to mental health care

Stigma as a barrier to mental health care

Over 60 million Americans are thought to experience mental illness in a given year, and the impacts of mental illness are undoubtedly felt by millions more in the form of family members, friends, and coworkers. Despite the availability of effective evidence-based treatment, about 40% of individuals with serious mental illness do not receive care and many who begin an intervention fail to complete it. A new report, published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, investigates stigma as a significant barrier to care for many individuals with mental illness. Continue reading