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Tag Archives: Science

Hide and seek: Revealing camouflaged bacteria

Hide and seek: Revealing camouflaged bacteria

A research team at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has discovered an protein family that plays a central role in the fight against the bacterial pathogen Salmonella within the cells. Continue reading

New combination drug therapy proves very effective in hepatitis C treatments

New combination drug therapy proves very effective in hepatitis C treatments

Treatment options for the 170 million people worldwide with chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are evolving rapidly, although the available regimens often come with significant side effects. Two multi-center clinical trials led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center show promise for a new option that could help lead to both an increase in patients cured with a much more simple and tolerable all oral therapy Continue reading

New combination drug therapy proves very effective in hepatitis C treatments

New combination drug therapy proves very effective in hepatitis C treatments

Treatment options for the 170 million people worldwide with chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are evolving rapidly, although the available regimens often come with significant side effects. Two multi-center clinical trials led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center show promise for a new option that could help lead to both an increase in patients cured with a much more simple and tolerable all oral therapy Continue reading

Disruption of VISTA plays an important role in regulating immune response

Disruption of VISTA plays an important role in regulating immune response

Date: April 7, 2014 Source: Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Summary: The body’s immune system response was enhanced in a study when researchers disrupted VISTA, a protein that prevents the immune system from overreacting. Understanding how checkpoint regulators like VISTA function is important to cancer researchers, who hope to use the immune system to attack tumors. Continue reading

Non-invasive imaging instead of repeated biopsy in active monitoring of prostate cancer

Non-invasive imaging instead of repeated biopsy in active monitoring of prostate cancer

Date: April 6, 2014 Source: University of Colorado Denver Summary: A novel method to ‘manipulate the lipid metabolism in the cancer cell to trick them to use more radiolabeled glucose, the basis of PET scanning’ is being described by researchers. The current study used the clinically safe drug etomoxir to block prostate cancer cells’ ability to oxidize lipids. Continue reading

Key cells in touch sensation identified: Skin cells use new molecule to send touch information to the brain

Key cells in touch sensation identified: Skin cells use new molecule to send touch information to the brain

In a study published in the April 6 online edition of the journal Nature , a team of Columbia University Medical Center researchers led by Ellen Lumpkin, PhD, associate professor of somatosensory biology, solve an age-old mystery of touch: how cells just beneath the skin surface enable us to feel fine details and textures. Continue reading

Helium ions may provide superior, better-targeted treatment in pediatric radiotherapy, study suggests

Helium ions may provide superior, better-targeted treatment in pediatric radiotherapy, study suggests

For the first time, researchers have been able to demonstrate that the use of helium ions in radiation therapy could provide accurate treatment to tumours while helping to spare healthy organs. A treatment planning study to be presented at the ESTRO 33 congress today Sunday has been able to show that helium may have effects that are superior to radiotherapy using protons, themselves a considerable advance on conventional photon beam radiotherapy Continue reading

Does a junk food diet make you lazy? Psychology study offers answer

Does a junk food diet make you lazy? Psychology study offers answer

A new UCLA psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary — not the other way around. Life scientists led by UCLA’s Aaron Blaisdell placed 32 female rats on one of two diets for six months. The first, a standard rat’s diet, consisted of relatively unprocessed foods like ground corn and fish meal. Continue reading

Race now or later? Calculating best time to compete after altitude training

Race now or later? Calculating best time to compete after altitude training

Date: April 3, 2014 Source: American Physiological Society (APS) Summary: A number of studies focus on the optimal time to begin altitude training before competition, but few address the best time to come down from altitude and how long athletes should wait to reacclimatize before competing. Researchers search for the answers in the new review article. Altitude training is a popular practice used by elite athletes to improve endurance in competitions, such as marathons and cycling races, that take place at sea level. Continue reading

Patient stem cells help identify common problem in ALS

Patient stem cells help identify common problem in ALS

Harvard stem cell scientists have discovered that a recently approved medication for epilepsy may possibly be a meaningful treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — Lou Gehrig’s disease, a uniformly fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The researchers are now collaborating with Massachusetts General Hospital to design an initial clinical trial testing the safety of the treatment in ALS patients. The investigators all caution that a great deal needs to be done to assure the safety and efficacy of the treatment in ALS patients, before physicians should start offering it Continue reading