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Tag Archives: Science

Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests

Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests

A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they’ve learned before, may boost later learning. Scientists have already established that resting the mind, as in daydreaming, helps strengthen memories of events and retention of information. In a new twist, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have shown that the right kind of mental rest, which strengthens and consolidates memories from recent learning tasks, helps boost future learning. Continue reading

Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests

Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests

A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they’ve learned before, may boost later learning. Continue reading

Positive subliminal messages on aging improve physical functioning in elderly

Positive subliminal messages on aging improve physical functioning in elderly

Older individuals who are subliminally exposed to positive stereotypes about aging showed improved physical functioning that can last for several weeks, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health has found. Continue reading

Research reveals likelihood, onset of multiple sclerosis diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease

Research reveals likelihood, onset of multiple sclerosis diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease

The results of the largest retrospective study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in uveitis patients has revealed that nearly 60 percent of patients with both diseases were diagnosed with each within a five-year span. Continue reading

Blinded by non-science: Trivial scientific information increases trust in products

Blinded by non-science: Trivial scientific information increases trust in products

Beware of trivial graphs and formulas, warns new research from Cornell University. Published this week in Public Understanding of Science , the Cornell Food and Brand Lab study found trivial graphs or formulas accompanying medical information can lead consumers to believe products are more effective. “Your faith in science may actually make you more likely to trust information that appears scientific but really doesn’t tell you much,” said lead author Aner Tal, post-doctoral researcher at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab Continue reading

Ebola’s deadly toll on healthcare workers

Ebola’s deadly toll on healthcare workers

Since its first outbreak in Guinea in December, 2013, Ebola has hit West African healthcare providers disproportionately hard. Hundreds of healthcare workers have been infected, many of whom have died, according to the World Health Organization Continue reading

Incorrect use of car seats widespread on first trip home from hospital, research shows

Incorrect use of car seats widespread on first trip home from hospital, research shows

Nearly all parents unknowingly put their newborn infants at risk as soon as they drive away from the hospital due to mistakes made with car safety seats, according to research to be presented Oct. 13 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition in San Diego. A study of 267 families at Oregon Health and Science University Hospital showed that 93 percent made at least one critical error in positioning their infant in a car safety seat or when installing the safety seat in the vehicle. Continue reading

Universal Ebola drug target identified by researchers

Universal Ebola drug target identified by researchers

University of Utah biochemists have reported a new drug discovery tool against the Ebola virus. According to a study published in this week’s online edition of Protein Science , they have produced a molecule, known as a peptide mimic, that displays a functionally critical region of the virus that is universally conserved in all known species of Ebola. This new tool can be used as a drug target in the discovery of anti-Ebola agents that are effective against all known strains and likely future strains Continue reading

Stroke-fighting drug offers potential treatment for traumatic brain injury

Stroke-fighting drug offers potential treatment for traumatic brain injury

The only drug currently approved for treatment of stroke’s crippling effects shows promise, when administered as a nasal spray, to help heal similar damage in less severe forms of traumatic brain injury. In the first examination of its kind, researchers Ye Xiong, Ph.D, Zhongwu Liu, Ph.D., and Michael Chopp, Ph.D., Scientific Director of the Henry Ford Neuroscience Institute, found in animal studies that the brain’s limited ability to repair itself after trauma can be enhanced when treated with the drug tPA, or tissue plasminogen activator. Continue reading

Prenatal BPA exposure associated with diminished lung function in children

Prenatal BPA exposure associated with diminished lung function in children

Date: October 6, 2014 Source: The JAMA Network Journals Summary: Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A, a common chemical used in some plastics, appears to be inconsistently associated with diminished lung function and the development of persistent wheeze in children. Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA, a common chemical used in some plastics) appears to be inconsistently associated with diminished lung function and the development of persistent wheeze in children, write Adam J Continue reading