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Tag Archives: Science

Up to 3,000 times the bacterial growth on hollow-head toothbrushes

Up to 3,000 times the bacterial growth on hollow-head toothbrushes

Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria compared to hollow-head toothbrushes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Dentistry. Continue reading

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules

Date: August 22, 2014 Source: Children’s Memorial Hospital Summary: Anyone who has suffered an injury can probably remember the after-effects, including pain, swelling or redness. These are signs that the body is fighting back against the injury. When tissue in the body is damaged, biological programs are activated to aid in tissue regeneration Continue reading

Impact of race, ethnicity in motor complete spinal cord injury

Impact of race, ethnicity in motor complete spinal cord injury

Researchers have published a study examining racial and ethnic influences in the outcomes of patients with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). The article, “Racial and ethnic disparities in functioning at discharge and follow-up among patients with motor complete SCI,” was published online ahead of print on August 2 by the Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation . Findings included small but significant differences in self-care and mobility at discharge; no differences were apparent at 1-year followup. Continue reading

Novel gene predicts both breast cancer relapse, response to chemotherapy

Novel gene predicts both breast cancer relapse, response to chemotherapy

Scientists have made it easier to predict both breast cancer relapses and responses to chemotherapy, through the identification of a unique gene. Continue reading

Taking a stand: Balancing the benefits, risks of physical activity in children

Taking a stand: Balancing the benefits, risks of physical activity in children

Today the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology took a stand on the promotion of childhood physical activity and published their position and recommendations in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism (APNM). This position stand provides an important overview of knowledge in the area of risk of physical activity for children and suggests both practical guidelines and a research agenda. Uniquely, this position stand addresses both benefits and risks of physical activity for children Continue reading

Why aren’t pregnant women getting flu vaccine?

Why aren’t pregnant women getting flu vaccine?

Both mother and fetus are at increased risk for complications of flu infection during pregnancy. And prenatal care providers say they’re advising women to get the flu vaccine, in line with recommendations from various organizations. Continue reading

Pygmy phenotype developed many times, adaptive to rainforest

Pygmy phenotype developed many times, adaptive to rainforest

The small body size associated with the pygmy phenotype is probably a selective adaptation for rainforest hunter-gatherers, according to an international team of researchers, but all African pygmy phenotypes do not have the same genetic underpinning, suggesting a more recent adaptation than previously thought. “I’m interested in how rainforest hunter-gatherers have adapted to their very challenging environments,” said George H Continue reading

Visual exposure predicts infants’ ability to follow another’s gaze

Visual exposure predicts infants’ ability to follow another’s gaze

Following another person’s gaze can reveal a wealth of information critical to social interactions and also to safety. Gaze following typically emerges in infancy, and new research looking at preterm infants suggests that it’s visual experience, not maturational age, that underlies this critical ability. The research is published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Continue reading

Advances in preterm birth

Advances in preterm birth

The Aug. 15 edition of the journal Science features a major article about the most important problem in obstetrics: preterm labor. The article, “Preterm labor: one syndrome, many causes,” delivers a powerful message: preterm birth is not one condition, but many, and provides a framework for meeting this challenge. Continue reading

NSAIDs may lower breast cancer recurrence rate in overweight, obese women

NSAIDs may lower breast cancer recurrence rate in overweight, obese women

Recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer was cut by half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to data published in Cancer Research , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Continue reading