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Tag Archives: Scientists

Towards new cancer therapies

Towards new cancer therapies

In 2012, about 8.2 million people died of cancer making the disease a major cause of death worldwide. Continue reading

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes wiped out in lab with genetic method that creates male-only offspring

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes wiped out in lab with genetic method that creates male-only offspring

Scientists have modified mosquitoes to produce sperm that will only create males, pioneering a fresh approach to eradicating malaria. In a study published in the journal Nature Communications , scientists from Imperial College London have tested a new genetic method that distorts the sex ratio of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, the main transmitters of the malaria parasite, so that the female mosquitoes that bite and pass the disease to humans are no longer produced. Continue reading

Details of calcium ‘safety-valve’ in cells explained

Details of calcium ‘safety-valve’ in cells explained

Sometimes a cell has to die — when it’s done with its job or inflicted with injury that could otherwise harm an organism. Conversely, cells that refuse to die when expected can lead to cancer. So scientists interested in fighting cancer have been keenly interested in learning the details of “programmed cell death.” They want to understand what happens when this process goes awry and identify new targets for anticancer drugs. Continue reading

New targets that could increase effectiveness, reduce side effects in breast cancer treatments

New targets that could increase effectiveness, reduce side effects in breast cancer treatments

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found new targets for potential intervention in breast cancer. Continue reading

Molecular secret of short, intense workouts clarified

Molecular secret of short, intense workouts clarified

In the last few years, the benefits of short, intense workouts have been extolled by both researchers and exercise fans as something of a metabolic panacea capable of providing greater overall fitness, better blood sugar control and weight reduction — all of it in periods as short as seven minutes a few times a week. Now, in a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) confirm that there is something molecularly unique about intense exercise: the activation of a single protein. Continue reading

Design of self-assembling protein nanomachines starts to click: A nanocage builds itself from engineered components

Design of self-assembling protein nanomachines starts to click: A nanocage builds itself from engineered components

A route for constructing protein nanomachines engineered for specific applications may be closer to reality. Biological systems produce an incredible array of self-assembling, functional protein tools. Continue reading

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa, dengue and other viruses affect more than one million people annually and are often fatal, yet scientists have never understood why only some virus-infected people come down with the disease and others do not. But now, virologists and immunologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a major clue to the mystery of “hemorrhagic fever” syndromes Continue reading

Human stem cells successfully transplanted, grown in pigs

Human stem cells successfully transplanted, grown in pigs

One of the biggest challenges for medical researchers studying the effectiveness of stem cell therapies is that transplants or grafts of cells are often rejected by the hosts. This rejection can render experiments useless, making research into potentially life-saving treatments a long and difficult process. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have shown that a new line of genetically modified pigs will host transplanted cells without the risk of rejection. Continue reading

Human stem cells successfully transplanted, grown in pigs

Human stem cells successfully transplanted, grown in pigs

One of the biggest challenges for medical researchers studying the effectiveness of stem cell therapies is that transplants or grafts of cells are often rejected by the hosts. This rejection can render experiments useless, making research into potentially life-saving treatments a long and difficult process Continue reading

Artificial lung the size of a sugar cube may replace animal testing

Artificial lung the size of a sugar cube may replace animal testing

What medications can be used to treat lung cancer, and how effective are they? Until now, drug companies have had to rely on animal testing to find out Continue reading