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Tag Archives: Scientists

New standards proposed for gauging muscle decline in older adults

New standards proposed for gauging muscle decline in older adults

Sarcopenia — the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength — may put up to 50 percent of seniors at greater risk for disability, yet there is no consensus within the medical community for how this condition should be measured. However, a new collection of articles appearing in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences (volume 69, number 5) lays out an empirically derived set of criteria for diagnosing sarcopenia Continue reading

Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment. Continue reading

Hereditary trauma: Inheritance of traumas and how they may be mediated

Hereditary trauma: Inheritance of traumas and how they may be mediated

Extreme and traumatic events can change a person — and often, years later, even affect their children. Continue reading

Possible target to combat muscle wasting

Possible target to combat muscle wasting

The pathological atrophy of skeletal muscle is a serious biomedical problem for which no effective treatment is currently available. Those most affected populations are the elderly diagnosed with sarcopenia and patients with cancer, AIDS, and other infectious diseases that develop cachexia. A study by scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB), headed by Antonio Zorzano, also full professor of the University of Barcelona, reveals a potential therapeutic target to tackle muscle wasting in these risk populations Continue reading

Natural protein Elafin against gluten intolerance?

Natural protein Elafin against gluten intolerance?

Scientists from INRA and INSERM (France) in collaboration with scientists from McMaster University (Canada) and the Ecole polytechnique fédérale of Zurich (Switzerland) have shown that Elafin, a human protein, plays a key role against the inflammatory reaction typical of celiac disease (gluten intolerance). They have also developed a probiotic bacterium able to deliver Elafin in the gut of mice. This innovation, published online in the American Journal of Gastroenterology on 8 April 2014, paves the way to new strategies to treat gluten intolerance. Continue reading

Breakthrough technology can repair severe tissue damage

Breakthrough technology can repair severe tissue damage

A breakthrough by Israeli researchers could speed recovery and limit scarring and disfigurement for patients who have suffered large soft tissue trauma — as often occurs with serious injury or cancer surgery. By biomedically engineering a muscle flap that includes a patient’s own blood vessels, the team has created tissue that could one day be transferred to other parts of the body along with the patient’s blood supply, speeding recovery and limiting scarring for patients who have suffered serious tissue trauma Continue reading

Potential drug targets in deadly pediatric brain tumors

Potential drug targets in deadly pediatric brain tumors

Researchers studying a rare, always fatal brain tumor in children have found several molecular alterations that drive the cancer, according to a new study from scientists at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and McGill University. The findings identify potential new targets for drug treatments. The new research could help physicians choose targeted agents with a better chance of combating pediatric high-grade astrocytomas, which are extremely difficult to treat with radiation and surgery Continue reading

What bank voles can teach us about prion disease transmission and neurodegeneration

What bank voles can teach us about prion disease transmission and neurodegeneration

When cannibals ate brains of people who died from prion disease, many of them fell ill with the fatal neurodegenerative disease as well. Likewise, when cows were fed protein contaminated with bovine prions, many of them developed mad cow disease. On the other hand, transmission of prions between species, for example from cows, sheep, or deer to humans, is — fortunately — inefficient, and only a small proportion of exposed recipients become sick within their lifetimes. Continue reading

What bank voles can teach us about prion disease transmission and neurodegeneration

What bank voles can teach us about prion disease transmission and neurodegeneration

When cannibals ate brains of people who died from prion disease, many of them fell ill with the fatal neurodegenerative disease as well. Likewise, when cows were fed protein contaminated with bovine prions, many of them developed mad cow disease. On the other hand, transmission of prions between species, for example from cows, sheep, or deer to humans, is — fortunately — inefficient, and only a small proportion of exposed recipients become sick within their lifetimes. Continue reading

Morning rays keep off pounds

Morning rays keep off pounds

A surprising new strategy for managing your weight? Bright morning light. A new Northwestern Medicine® study reports the timing, intensity and duration of your light exposure during the day is linked to your weight — the first time this has been shown. Continue reading