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Tag Archives: Skin

Stem cell technology points to early indicators of schizophrenia

Stem cell technology points to early indicators of schizophrenia

Using new stem cell technology, scientists at the Salk Institute have shown that neurons generated from the skin cells of people with schizophrenia behave strangely in early developmental stages, providing a hint as to ways to detect and potentially treat the disease early. The findings of the study, published online in April’s Molecular Psychiatry , support the theory that the neurological dysfunction that eventually causes schizophrenia may begin in the brains of babies still in the womb. “This study aims to investigate the earliest detectable changes in the brain that lead to schizophrenia,” says Fred H. Continue reading

Humans and companion animals harbor the same types of MRSA infections

Humans and companion animals harbor the same types of MRSA infections

shared population of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria circulates both in humans and companion animals, according to a study published this week in mBio® , the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. “Our study demonstrates that humans and companion animals readily exchange and share MRSA bacteria from the same population,” says senior author Mark Holmes, senior lecturer in preventive veterinary medicine at the University of Cambridge in England. Continue reading

Humans and companion animals harbor the same types of MRSA infections

Humans and companion animals harbor the same types of MRSA infections

shared population of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria circulates both in humans and companion animals, according to a study published this week in mBio® , the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. “Our study demonstrates that humans and companion animals readily exchange and share MRSA bacteria from the same population,” says senior author Mark Holmes, senior lecturer in preventive veterinary medicine at the University of Cambridge in England Continue reading

Not all wedded bliss: Marital stress linked to depression

Not all wedded bliss: Marital stress linked to depression

Marital stress may make people more vulnerable to depression, according to a recent study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and their colleagues. The long-term study, published in the April 2014 Journal of Psychophysiology , shows that people who experience chronic marital stress are less able to savor positive experiences, a hallmark of depression. They are also more likely to report other depressive symptoms. Continue reading

Some immune cells defend only one organ

Some immune cells defend only one organ

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. Continue reading

Microgravity research helping to understand the fungi within

Microgravity research helping to understand the fungi within

You may not recognize it by name, but if you have ever had a child with a diaper rash, that child was likely a host to Candida albicans ( C. albicans ) Continue reading

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. The participants, each of whom had been paralyzed for more than two years, were able to voluntarily flex their toes, ankles, and knees while the stimulator was active, and the movements were enhanced over time when combined with physical rehabilitation. Researchers involved in the study say the therapy has the potential to change the prognosis of people with paralysis even years after injury. Continue reading

Flipping the switch on scleroderma

Flipping the switch on scleroderma

Scleroderma is a rare and often fatal disease, causing the thickening of tissue, that currently lacks a cure and any effective treatments. A group of researchers, including a Michigan State University professor, is looking to change that. “Our findings provide a new approach to developing better treatment options where few have existed,” said Richard Neubig, chairperson of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology in MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine Continue reading

Infants are sensitive to pleasant touch

Infants are sensitive to pleasant touch

Infants show unique physiological and behavioral responses to pleasant touch, which may help to cement the bonds between child and parent and promote early social and physiological development, according to research published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Previous studies with adults have shown that when the skin is stroked, a specific type of touch receptor is activated in response to a particular stroking velocity, leading to the sensation of “pleasant” touch. Cognitive neuroscientist Merle Fairhurst of the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, Germany, and colleagues hypothesized that this type of response might emerge as early as infancy Continue reading

Good bacteria that protects against HIV identified

Good bacteria that protects against HIV identified

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston by growing vaginal skin cells outside the body and studying the way they interact with “good and bad” bacteria, think they may be able to better identify the good bacteria that protect women from HIV infection and other sexually transmitted infections. The health of the human vagina depends on a symbiotic/mutually beneficial relationship with “good” bacteria that live on its surface feeding on products produced by vaginal skin cells. These good bacteria, in turn, create a physical and chemical barrier to bad bacteria and viruses including HIV Continue reading