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Tag Archives: Skin

New biometric watches use light to non-invasively monitor glucose, dehydration, pulse

New biometric watches use light to non-invasively monitor glucose, dehydration, pulse

Monitoring a patient’s vital signs and other physiological parameters is a standard part of medical care, but, increasingly, health and fitness-minded individuals are looking for ways to easily keep their own tabs on these measurements. Continue reading

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Certain bonds connecting biological cells get stronger when they’re tugged. Those bonds could help keep hearts together and pumping; breakdowns of those bonds could help cancer cells break away and spread. Those bonds are known as catch bonds and they’re formed by common adhesion proteins called cadherins. Continue reading

Lasers, night-vision technology help improve imaging of hidden lymphatic system

Lasers, night-vision technology help improve imaging of hidden lymphatic system

The human lymphatic system is an important but poorly understood circulatory system consisting of tiny vessels spread throughout the body. This “drainage” network helps guard against infections and prevents swelling, which occasionally happens when disease or trauma interrupts normal lymphatic function. Chronic swelling is the hallmark of a painful, incurable condition known as lymphedema, which often occurs after cancer therapy and can leave the limbs and other body parts disfigured for life. Continue reading

Rare skin cancer on palms, soles more likely to come back compared to other melanomas

Rare skin cancer on palms, soles more likely to come back compared to other melanomas

A rare type of melanoma that disproportionately attacks the palms and soles and under the nails of Asians, African-Americans, and Hispanics, who all generally have darker skins, and is not caused by sun exposure, is almost twice as likely to recur than other similar types of skin cancer, according to results of a study in 244 patients. The finding about acral lentiginous melanoma, as the potentially deadly cancer is known, is part of a study to be presented May 31 by researchers at the Perlmutter Cancer Center of NYU Langone at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago Continue reading

A better way to treat ACE inhibitor angioedema in the ED

A better way to treat ACE inhibitor angioedema in the ED

Investigators at the University of Cincinnati have found a safe and effective treatment for life-threatening angioedema attacks in the emergency department. In angioedema, patients experience a rapid swelling of the skin and subcutaneous tissues — which, in some cases, can lead to airway obstruction and suffocation. Continue reading

Stem cell technology points to early indicators of schizophrenia

Stem cell technology points to early indicators of schizophrenia

Using new stem cell technology, scientists at the Salk Institute have shown that neurons generated from the skin cells of people with schizophrenia behave strangely in early developmental stages, providing a hint as to ways to detect and potentially treat the disease early. The findings of the study, published online in April’s Molecular Psychiatry , support the theory that the neurological dysfunction that eventually causes schizophrenia may begin in the brains of babies still in the womb. “This study aims to investigate the earliest detectable changes in the brain that lead to schizophrenia,” says Fred H. Continue reading

Humans and companion animals harbor the same types of MRSA infections

Humans and companion animals harbor the same types of MRSA infections

shared population of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria circulates both in humans and companion animals, according to a study published this week in mBio® , the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. “Our study demonstrates that humans and companion animals readily exchange and share MRSA bacteria from the same population,” says senior author Mark Holmes, senior lecturer in preventive veterinary medicine at the University of Cambridge in England. Continue reading

Humans and companion animals harbor the same types of MRSA infections

Humans and companion animals harbor the same types of MRSA infections

shared population of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria circulates both in humans and companion animals, according to a study published this week in mBio® , the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. “Our study demonstrates that humans and companion animals readily exchange and share MRSA bacteria from the same population,” says senior author Mark Holmes, senior lecturer in preventive veterinary medicine at the University of Cambridge in England Continue reading

Not all wedded bliss: Marital stress linked to depression

Not all wedded bliss: Marital stress linked to depression

Marital stress may make people more vulnerable to depression, according to a recent study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and their colleagues. The long-term study, published in the April 2014 Journal of Psychophysiology , shows that people who experience chronic marital stress are less able to savor positive experiences, a hallmark of depression. They are also more likely to report other depressive symptoms. Continue reading

Some immune cells defend only one organ

Some immune cells defend only one organ

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. Continue reading