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Tag Archives: Social

Alcohol-programming outreach is especially important for female Black, Latina drinkers

Alcohol-programming outreach is especially important for female Black, Latina drinkers

Very few national studies have examined racial/ethnic disparities in the use of alcohol services. In addition, little is known about whether racial/ethnic disparities generalize across genders, and what factors may account for any disparities. A study of the combined impact of race/ethnicity and gender on alcohol services utilization has found a pattern of lower services utilization among Latinos and Blacks, versus Whites, and women, versus men Continue reading

Who will binge-drink at age 16? Teen imaging study pinpoints predictors

Who will binge-drink at age 16? Teen imaging study pinpoints predictors

Neuroscientists leading the largest longitudinal adolescent brain imaging study to date have learned that predicting teenage binge-drinking is possible. Continue reading

Veterans who identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual could benefit from informed mental health services, researcher says

Veterans who identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual could benefit from informed mental health services, researcher says

In 2011, the United States Military repealed its “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy that prevented gay and lesbian service members from disclosing their sexual orientation. Current estimates indicate that more than 1 million veterans identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) Continue reading

Schizophrenia and cannabis use may share common genes

Schizophrenia and cannabis use may share common genes

Genes that increase the risk of developing schizophrenia may also increase the likelihood of using cannabis, according to a new study led by King’s College London, published today in Molecular Psychiatry. Previous studies have identified a link between cannabis use and schizophrenia, but it has remained unclear whether this association is due to cannabis directly increasing the risk of the disorder. Continue reading

When good people do bad things: Being in a group makes some people lose touch with their personal moral beliefs

When good people do bad things: Being in a group makes some people lose touch with their personal moral beliefs

When people get together in groups, unusual things can happen — both good and bad. Groups create important social institutions that an individual could not achieve alone, but there can be a darker side to such alliances: Belonging to a group makes people more likely to harm others outside the group. Continue reading

Courts face challenges when linking genetics to criminal behavior

Courts face challenges when linking genetics to criminal behavior

Studies suggest that some people may be at increased risk of criminal behavior due to their genes. Such research holds potential for helping judges and juries with some of the difficult decisions they must make, but it also brings a substantial risk of misinterpretation and misuse within the legal system. Addressing these issues will be of critical importance for upholding principles of justice and fairness, according to an essay being published in the June 4 issue of the Cell Press journal Neuron . Continue reading

How the ‘long shadow’ of an inner city childhood affects adult success

How the ‘long shadow’ of an inner city childhood affects adult success

In a groundbreaking study, Johns Hopkins University researchers followed nearly 800 Baltimore school children for a quarter of a century and discovered that their fates were substantially determined by the family they were born into. “A family’s resources and the doors they open cast a long shadow over children’s life trajectories,” Johns Hopkins sociologist Karl Alexander says in a forthcoming book, The Long Shadow: Family Background, Disadvantaged Urban Youth and the Transition to Adulthood. “This view is at odds with the popular ethos that we are makers of our own fortune.” Alexander, who joined Johns Hopkins in 1972 and retires this summer, spent nearly his entire career on the study, along with fellow researchers and co-authors Doris Entwisle and Linda Olson Continue reading

Where one lives matters in relationship between obesity, life satisfaction

Where one lives matters in relationship between obesity, life satisfaction

A new study suggests that how one compares weight-wise with others in his or her community plays a key role in determining how satisfied the person is with his or her life. “The most interesting finding for us was that, in U.S Continue reading

Five lung transplants performed at hospital in 24 hours

Five lung transplants performed at hospital in 24 hours

Loyola University Medical Center recently performed five successful lung transplants in just over 24 hours. Put in perspective, five is the average number of lung transplants performed each day throughout the entire country. The patients, all doing well, are a teacher, a judge, an executive director, a grandmother and an extraordinary young woman who beat very long odds to undergo a second lung transplant in three years Continue reading

One in 10 16-year-olds have considered self-harm, study shows

One in 10 16-year-olds have considered self-harm, study shows

One in ten 16-year-olds surveyed in a new study by Queen’s University and the University of Ulster have considered self-harm or taking an overdose. The results of the annual Young Life and Times (YLT) survey, which are published today during Mental Health Awareness Week, also found that almost a third of 16-year-olds questioned had experienced serious personal, emotional or mental health problems at some point in the past year. 1,367 16-year-olds across Northern Ireland took part in the 2013 survey undertaken by ARK, a joint initiative by Queen’s University and the University of Ulster. Continue reading