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Tag Archives: Social

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity — the most “feminine” girls and the most “masculine” boys — are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. The most feminine teenage girls use tanning beds more frequently and are more likely to be physically inactive, while the most masculine teenage boys are more likely to use chewing tobacco and to smoke cigars, compared with their gender-nonconforming peers. The study, the first to look at cancer risk behaviors in teens based on their gender expression, appears online April 16, 2014 in the Journal of Adolescent Health Continue reading

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity — the most “feminine” girls and the most “masculine” boys — are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. The most feminine teenage girls use tanning beds more frequently and are more likely to be physically inactive, while the most masculine teenage boys are more likely to use chewing tobacco and to smoke cigars, compared with their gender-nonconforming peers Continue reading

Stressful environments genetically affect African American boys

Stressful environments genetically affect African American boys

Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on the genes of children as young as age 9, according to a study led by Princeton University and Pennsylvania State University researchers. Such chronic stress during youth leads to physiological weathering similar to aging. A study of 40 9-year-old black boys, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , shows that those who grow up in disadvantaged environments have shorter telomeres — DNA sequences that generally shrink with age — than their advantaged peers Continue reading

Genes increase the stress of social disadvantage for some children

Genes increase the stress of social disadvantage for some children

Genes amplify the stress of harsh environments for some children, and magnify the advantage of supportive environments for other children, according to a study that’s one of the first to document how genes interacting with social environments affect biomarkers of stress. “Our findings suggest that an individual’s genetic architecture moderates the magnitude of the response to external stimuli — but it is the environment that determines the direction” says Colter Mitchell, lead author of the paper and a researcher at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research (ISR). The study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , uses telomere length as a marker of stress. Continue reading

Fathers can lower their children’s risk of going hungry by staying involved

Fathers can lower their children’s risk of going hungry by staying involved

Fathers who don’t live with their children can actually lower their son’s or daughter’s risk of not having enough food by just maintaining involvement in the child’s life. And if the father provides support beyond money, such as gifts, groceries and other offerings, the child’s risk of food insecurity may be further reduced. Continue reading

The long and the short of telomeres: Loneliness impacts DNA repair, parrot study shows

The long and the short of telomeres: Loneliness impacts DNA repair, parrot study shows

Scientists at the Vetmeduni Vienna examined the telomere length of captive African grey parrots. They found that the telomere lengths of single parrots were shorter than those housed with a companion parrot, which supports the hypothesis that social stress can interfere with cellular aging and a particular type of DNA repair Continue reading

Higher social class linked to fewer bone fractures among non-white women

Higher social class linked to fewer bone fractures among non-white women

If you are a middle-aged African-American or Asian woman, your social class may play a significant role in how likely you are to suffer bone fracutres, a UCLA-led study suggests. The study, published in the current issue of Osteoporosis International, is unique in that it followed Asian, African-American and white women for a period of nine years during mid-life; most previous studies on socioeconomic status and osteoporosis risk had focused solely on older white women and often had not collected information on fractures over time. The new findings help shed light on the importance of social class — and particularly education levels — in the fracture risk of mid-life women from different racial and ethnic groups, the researchers said Continue reading

Drawing conclusions: Children’s drawings during abuse investigations

Drawing conclusions: Children’s drawings during abuse investigations

Is a picture worth only a thousand words? According to Dr. Continue reading

Accesses to health data made public

Accesses to health data made public

unable to retrieve full-text contentA list of bodies that have been allowed to access NHS patient data is released by the Health and Social Care Information Centre. Continue reading

Accesses to health data made public

Accesses to health data made public

unable to retrieve full-text contentA list of bodies that have been allowed to access NHS patient data is released by the Health and Social Care Information Centre. Continue reading