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New optimal screening threshold for gestational diabetes in twin pregnancies: Ideal 1-hour 50-g glucose challenge test cutoff ≥135 mg/dl

New optimal screening threshold for gestational diabetes in twin pregnancies: Ideal 1-hour 50-g glucose challenge test cutoff ≥135 mg/dl

A common complication, gestational diabetes affects approximately 6-7% of pregnant women. Currently, screening is done in two steps to help identify patients most at risk; however, the suggested levels for additional testing were based on singleton pregnancy data Continue reading

Heart’s own immune cells can help it heal

Heart’s own immune cells can help it heal

The heart holds its own pool of immune cells capable of helping it heal after injury, according to new research in mice at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Most of the time when the heart is injured, these beneficial immune cells are supplanted by immune cells from the bone marrow, which are spurred to converge in the heart and cause inflammation that leads to further damage. Continue reading

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders prevalence in U.S. revealed by study

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders prevalence in U.S. revealed by study

Nearly 5 percent of U.S. Continue reading

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine’s significant obstacles. The researchers will present their technique at the 168th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), held October 27-31, 2014, at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel Continue reading

Making lab-grown tissues stronger

Making lab-grown tissues stronger

Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments. Cartilage, for example, is a hard material that caps the ends of bones and allows joints to work smoothly Continue reading

Campaign to reduce firearm suicide wins support among firearm retailers in New Hampshire

Campaign to reduce firearm suicide wins support among firearm retailers in New Hampshire

Nearly half (48%) of firearm retailers in New Hampshire displayed materials from a firearm suicide prevention campaign generated by a coalition of gun owners and public health professionals, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. It is the first collaboration between firearm retailers and public health professionals around suicide prevention. The study appeared online October 28, 2014 in Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior . Continue reading

First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast cancer protein. Continue reading

Novel ultrasound technology to screen for heart conditions developed by engineers

Novel ultrasound technology to screen for heart conditions developed by engineers

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain. In order to make the study possible, researchers have developed a novel ultrasound technology that makes screening cheaper and much easier, making it possible to reach a large number of people and even infants. Continue reading

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel consisting of short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA. These carbon nanotube “porins” have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications. Continue reading

Fewer women than men receive hemodialysis treatment

Fewer women than men receive hemodialysis treatment

Fewer women than men are treated with dialysis for end-stage kidney disease, according to a new comprehensive analysis of sex-specific differences in treatment published this week in PLOS Medicine . The results of the study, conducted by Manfred Hecking with Friedrich Port and colleagues from Arbor Research Collaborative for Health in Ann Arbor, Michigan, suggest that these findings call for further detailed study for the reasons underlying the sex-specific differences in end-stage renal disease treatment. Chronic kidney disease often progresses to end-stage renal disease, which is treated by regular hemodialysis (a process in which blood is purified by passing it through a filtration machine) or by kidney transplantation. Continue reading