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Wine only protects against CVD in people who exercise

Wine only protects against CVD in people who exercise

Wine only protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) in people who exercise, according to results from the In Vino Veritas (IVV) study presented at ESC Congress today by Professor Milos Taborsky from the Czech Republic. Professor Taborsky said: “This is the first randomised trial comparing the effects of red and white wine on markers of atherosclerosis in people at mild to moderate risk of CVD. We found that moderate wine drinking was only protective in people who exercised. Continue reading

Drinking tea reduces non-CV mortality by 24 percent

Drinking tea reduces non-CV mortality by 24 percent

Drinking tea reduces non-cardiovascular mortality by 24%, reveals a study in 13,000 people presented at ESC Congress by Professor Nicolas Danchin from France. Professor Danchin said: “If you have to choose between tea or coffee it’s probably better to drink tea. Coffee and tea are important components of our way of life. Continue reading

Batteryless cardiac pacemaker is based on automatic wristwatch

Batteryless cardiac pacemaker is based on automatic wristwatch

A new batteryless cardiac pacemaker based on an automatic wristwatch and powered by heart motion was presented at ESC Congress 2014 today by Adrian Zurbuchen from Switzerland. The prototype device does not require battery replacement. Continue reading

Antidepressants show potential for postoperative pain

Antidepressants show potential for postoperative pain

After a systematic review of clinical trials based on administering antidepressants for acute and chronic postsurgical pain, researchers have concluded that more trials are needed to determine whether these drugs should be prescribed for postsurgical pain on a regular basis. Dr. Ian Gilron, a professor and director of clinical pain research in the Department of Anesthesiology, and his team of seven researchers reviewed 15 trials to determine whether the use of antidepressants for pain relief post-surgery would work more effectively than painkillers such as opioids, local anesthetics, or acetaminophen. Continue reading

Preventing cancer from forming ‘tentacles’ stops dangerous spread

Preventing cancer from forming ‘tentacles’ stops dangerous spread

A new study from the research group of Dr. John Lewis at the University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB) and the Lawson Health Research Institute (London, ON) has confirmed that “invadopodia” play a key role in the spread of cancer. The study, published in Cell Reports , shows preventing these tentacle-like structures from forming can stop the spread of cancer entirely Continue reading

Options for weight loss your primary care doctor might not know about

Options for weight loss your primary care doctor might not know about

Despite US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for screening and treating obesity, there are many barriers, several of which may be ameliorated through technological approaches according to a new study by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center published online August 21, 2014 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine (JGIM). David Levine, MD, MA, a third year resident in the Department of Internal Medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center, and colleagues found that compared to usual care, technology-assisted interventions specifically in the primary care setting help patients achieve weight loss. Continue reading

Efficacy of new gene therapy approach for toxin exposures shown in mouse study

Efficacy of new gene therapy approach for toxin exposures shown in mouse study

The current method to treat acute toxin poisoning is to inject antibodies, commonly produced in animals, to neutralize the toxin. But this method has challenges ranging from safety to difficulties in developing, producing and maintaining the anti-serums in large quantities. New research led by Charles Shoemaker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, shows that gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods. Continue reading

How Ebola blocks immune system

How Ebola blocks immune system

Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body’s antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies, in research results published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. In work performed at Beamline 19ID at Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source, the researchers developed a detailed map of how a non-pathogenic Ebola protein, VP24, binds to a host protein that takes signaling molecules in and out of the cell nucleus. Their map revealed that the viral protein takes away the host protein’s ability to carry an important immune signal into the nucleus. Continue reading

Revealing novel mode of action for osteoporosis drug

Revealing novel mode of action for osteoporosis drug

Raloxifene is a U.S. Continue reading

Evidence mounting that older adults who volunteer are happier, healthier

Evidence mounting that older adults who volunteer are happier, healthier

Older adults who stay active by volunteering are getting more out of it than just an altruistic feeling — they are receiving a health boost! A new study, led by the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences and published online this week in Psychological Bulletin , is the first to take a broad-brush look at all the available peer-reviewed evidence regarding the psychosocial health benefits of formal volunteering for older adults. Continue reading