List/Grid

Tag Archives: Source

Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain, inflammation in cataract surgery patients

Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain, inflammation in cataract surgery patients

The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and pain following cataract surgery has been shown to be a reliable alternative to medicated eye drops, which are the current standard of care, according to a study presented  at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The device, known as a punctum plug, automatically delivers the correct amount of postoperative medication in patients, potentially solving the issue of poor compliance with self-administering eye drops. After cataract surgery, most patients are prescribed topical eye drops to reduce ocular inflammation that often occurs after surgery, but many do not or are not able to comply with the recommended dosing regimen. Continue reading

Research reveals likelihood, onset of multiple sclerosis diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease

Research reveals likelihood, onset of multiple sclerosis diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease

The results of the largest retrospective study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in uveitis patients has revealed that nearly 60 percent of patients with both diseases were diagnosed with each within a five-year span. Continue reading

Gene duplications associated with autism evolved recently in human history

Gene duplications associated with autism evolved recently in human history

Human geneticists have discovered that a region of the genome associated with autism contains genetic variation that evolved in the last 250,000 years, after the divergence of humans from ancient hominids, and likely plays an important role in disease. Their findings were presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego. Researchers at the University of Washington analyzed the genomes of 2,551 humans, 86 apes, one Neanderthal, and one Denisovan Continue reading

Women more likely to develop anxiety and depression after heart attack

Women more likely to develop anxiety and depression after heart attack

Women are more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart attack (myocardial infarction; MI) than men, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Professor Pranas Serpytis from Lithuania. Continue reading

Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified

Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified

Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate — conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy — and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene. Continue reading

Children’s genes affect their mothers’ risk of rheumatoid arthritis

Children’s genes affect their mothers’ risk of rheumatoid arthritis

A child’s genetic makeup may contribute to his or her mother’s risk of rheumatoid arthritis, possibly explaining why women are at higher risk of developing the disease than men. This research will be presented October 21, at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego. Rheumatoid arthritis, a painful inflammatory condition that primarily affects the joints, has been tied to a variety of genetic and environmental factors, including lifestyle factors and previous infections. Continue reading

Women driven by status, wealth rather than wanting babies, study suggests

Women driven by status, wealth rather than wanting babies, study suggests

A new study suggests that women are more driven to seek wealth and status than they are to reproduce. The research by Oxford University and Sheffield University says although low fertility may seem to go against traditional ideas about evolutionary success, a woman will delay and reduce her fertility if it brings her opportunities for higher status. The findings are based on interviews with 9,000 women in Mongolia, a country that underwent a sudden transition from a Soviet-style state to mass privatization Continue reading

Women driven by status, wealth rather than wanting babies, study suggests

Women driven by status, wealth rather than wanting babies, study suggests

A new study suggests that women are more driven to seek wealth and status than they are to reproduce. The research by Oxford University and Sheffield University says although low fertility may seem to go against traditional ideas about evolutionary success, a woman will delay and reduce her fertility if it brings her opportunities for higher status. The findings are based on interviews with 9,000 women in Mongolia, a country that underwent a sudden transition from a Soviet-style state to mass privatization. Continue reading

YouTube as peer support for severe mental illness

YouTube as peer support for severe mental illness

People with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder use a popular social media website like YouTube to provide and receive naturally occurring peer support, Dartmouth researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE. “What we found most surprising about our findings was that people with severe mental illness were so open about their illness experiences on a public social media website like YouTube,” said lead author John Naslund, A PhD student in health policy at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice. “We saw that people with severe mental illness did not appear to be concerned about the risks of openly sharing their personal illness experiences because they really wanted to help others with similar mental health problems.” Naslund and colleagues found that people with severe mental illness used YouTube to feel less alone and to find hope, to support and to defend each other, and to share personal stories and strategies for coping with day-to-day challenges Continue reading

Using feminist theory to understand male rape

Using feminist theory to understand male rape

Decades of feminist research have framed rape and sexual assault as a ‘women’s issue’, leaving little room for the experiences of male victims. But a new study published in the Journal of Gender Studies suggests that feminist theory, with its focus on the gendered nature of rape, can also help us understand the stigmas, social constructions and realities associated with male rape Continue reading