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Federal food program puts food on the table, but dietary quality could be improved

Federal food program puts food on the table, but dietary quality could be improved

A new American Cancer Society study suggests that participants in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), previously known as the food stamp program, had lower dietary quality scores compared with income eligible non-participants. The authors say the findings emphasize the need to bolster programs aimed at enhancing the dietary quality of SNAP participants. Continue reading

Fruit and vegetable consumption could be as good for your mental as your physical health

Fruit and vegetable consumption could be as good for your mental as your physical health

Fruit and vegetable consumption could be as good for your mental as your physical health, new research suggests. The research, conducted by the University of Warwick’s Medical School using data from the Health Survey for England, and published by BMJ Open focused on mental wellbeing and found that high and low mental wellbeing were consistently associated with an individual’s fruit and vegetable consumption. Continue reading

Presence or absence of early language delay alters anatomy of the brain in autism

Presence or absence of early language delay alters anatomy of the brain in autism

Individual differences in early language development, and in later language functioning, are associated with changes in the anatomy of the brain in autism. A new study led by researchers from the University of Cambridge has found that a common characteristic of autism — language delay in early childhood — leaves a ‘signature’ in the brain. Continue reading

We drink more alcohol on gym days

We drink more alcohol on gym days

A new Northwestern Medicine ® study finds that on days when people exercise more — typically Thursdays to Sundays — they drink more alcohol, too. This is the only study to use smartphone technology and a daily diary approach for self-reporting physical activity and alcohol use. “Monday through Wednesday people batten down the hatches and they cut back on alcohol consumption,” said David E. Continue reading

Statin use during hospitalization for hemorrhagic stroke associated with improved survival

Statin use during hospitalization for hemorrhagic stroke associated with improved survival

Patients who were treated with a statin in the hospital after suffering from a hemorrhagic stroke were significantly more likely to survive than those who were not, according to a study published today in JAMA Neurology . This study was conducted by the same researchers who recently discovered that the use of cholesterol-lowering statins can improve survival in victims of ischemic stroke. Ischemic stroke is caused by a constriction or obstruction of a blood vessel that blocks blood from reaching areas of the brain, while hemorrhagic stroke, also known as intracerebral hemorrhage, is bleeding in the brain Continue reading

Old drug may be key to new antibiotics

Old drug may be key to new antibiotics

McMaster scientists have found that an anticonvulsant drug may help in developing a new class of antibiotics. Although dozens of antibiotics target what bacteria do, their study has looked at how a certain part of bacteria are created, and they found there is a way of stopping it. The discovery is important as there is growing concern worldwide about how antibiotic resistance is making the cures for infections ineffective. Continue reading

Actions on climate change bring better health, study says

Actions on climate change bring better health, study says

The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association . Milwaukee and New York City could experience three times as many 90-degree days by 2046; Dallas could see twice as many days topping 100 degrees Continue reading

Artificial liver tested as potential therapy for patients with alcohol-related organ failure

Artificial liver tested as potential therapy for patients with alcohol-related organ failure

Cedars-Sinai physicians and scientists are testing a novel, human cell based, bioartificial liver support system for patients with acute liver failure, often a fatal diagnosis. “The quest for a device that can fill in for the function of the liver, at least temporarily, has been underway for decades. A bioartificial liver, also known as a BAL, could potentially sustain patients with acute liver failure until their own livers self-repair,” said Steven D Continue reading

New bracelet strengthens computer security

New bracelet strengthens computer security

In a big step for securing critical information systems, such as medical records in clinical settings, Dartmouth College researchers have created a new approach to computer security that authenticates users continuously while they are using a terminal and automatically logs them out when they leave or when someone else steps in to use their terminal. Continue reading

New bracelet strengthens computer security

New bracelet strengthens computer security

In a big step for securing critical information systems, such as medical records in clinical settings, Dartmouth College researchers have created a new approach to computer security that authenticates users continuously while they are using a terminal and automatically logs them out when they leave or when someone else steps in to use their terminal. Dartmouth’s Trustworthy Health and Wellness (THaW)/ researchers recently presented their findings at the IEEE Symposium on Security & Privacy. Common authentication methods based on passwords, tokens or fingerprints perform one-time authentication and rely on users to log out from the computer terminal when they leave. Continue reading