List/Grid

Tag Archives: Source

Scientists link environment, inclusion in adults with disabilities

Scientists link environment, inclusion in adults with disabilities

Kessler Foundation researchers have identified an association between the built environment and disability-related outcomes for adults with physical impairments. The article, Disability and the built environment: an investigation of community and neighborhood land uses and participation for physically impaired adults, was published in the July issue of Annals of Epidemiology . The authors are Amanda Botticello, PhD, MPH, and Nicole Cobbold, BS, of Kessler Foundation, and Tanya Rohrbach, MS, of Raritan Valley Community College, Branchburg, NJ Continue reading

Native bacteria block Wolbachia from being passed to mosquito progeny

Native bacteria block Wolbachia from being passed to mosquito progeny

Native bacteria living inside mosquitoes prevent the insects from passing Wolbachia bacteria — which can make the mosquitoes resistant to the malaria parasite — to their offspring, according to a team of researchers. The team found that Asaia , a type of bacteria that occurs naturally in Anopheles mosquitoes, blocks invasion of Wolbachia into the mosquitoes’ germlines — the cells that are passed on through successive generations of an organism — thus stopping the insects from transmitting Wolbachia to their offspring. ” Wolbachia infects up to 70 percent of all known insect species, but is notably absent from some groups, including the Anopheles mosquitoes that transmit malaria,” said Jason Rasgon, associate professor of entomology, Penn State. Continue reading

Gloves after hand washing associated with fewer infections in preterm babies

Gloves after hand washing associated with fewer infections in preterm babies

Extremely premature babies in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) had fewer infections when medical staff wore gloves after washing their hands compared with hand washing alone. Continue reading

Normal cognition in patient without apolipoprotein E, risk factor for Alzheimer’s

Normal cognition in patient without apolipoprotein E, risk factor for Alzheimer’s

A 40-year-old California man exhibits normal cognitive function although he has no apolipoprotein E (apoE), which is believed to be important for brain function but a mutation of which is also a known risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). Continue reading

Bisphosphonates for osteoporosis not associated with reduced breast cancer risk, study suggests

Bisphosphonates for osteoporosis not associated with reduced breast cancer risk, study suggests

An analysis of data from two randomized clinical trials finds that three to four years of treatment with bisphosphonates to improve bone density is not linked to reduced risk of invasive postmenopausal breast cancer. Some studies have suggested that bisphosphonates, which are commonly used to treat osteoporosis, may have antitumor and antimetastatic properties Continue reading

Blacks, women face greater burden from CVD risk factors

Blacks, women face greater burden from CVD risk factors

The impact of major cardiovascular risk factors combined is greater in women than men and in blacks than whites. While the gender gap may be narrowing, differences by race may be increasing, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. “We’ve been targeting traditional risk factors in public health campaigns for many years,” said Susan Cheng, M.D., M.P.H., study lead author and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Mass. Continue reading

Vaccine alternative protects mice against malaria

Vaccine alternative protects mice against malaria

A study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that injecting a vaccine-like compound into mice was effective in protecting them from malaria. The findings suggest a potential new path toward the elusive goal of malaria immunization. Mice injected with a virus genetically altered to help the rodents create an antibody designed to fight the malaria parasite produced high levels of the anti-malaria antibody. Continue reading

Long-sought drug candidate can halt tumor growth, scientists demonstrate

Long-sought drug candidate can halt tumor growth, scientists demonstrate

It’s a trick any cat burglar knows: to open a locked door, slide a credit card past the latch. Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) tried a similar strategy when they attempted to disrupt the function of MYC, a cancer regulator thought to be “undruggable.” The researchers found that a credit card-like molecule they developed somehow moves in and disrupts the critical interactions between MYC and its binding partner. Continue reading

Malaria medicine chloroquine inhibits tumor growth, metastases, study shows

Malaria medicine chloroquine inhibits tumor growth, metastases, study shows

The anti-cancer effect of the antimalarial agent chloroquine when combined with conventional chemotherapy has been well documented in experimental animal models. To date, it was assumed that chloroquine increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy by means of a direct effect on the cancer cells Continue reading

‘Worm pill’ could ease autoimmune disease symptoms

‘Worm pill’ could ease autoimmune disease symptoms

Experts believe a molecule in parasitic worms could help explain why worm infections can effectively treat a range of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. The Monash University study, published in the FASEB Journal , successfully identified peptides from parasitic worms that suppress the body’s immune response. Researchers believe this could pave the way for a new drug containing the peptide to provide relief from the symptoms of autoimmune diseases. Continue reading