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Influenza A potentiates pneumococcal co-infection: New details emerge

Influenza A potentiates pneumococcal co-infection: New details emerge

Influenza infection can enhance the ability of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause ear and throat infections, according to research published ahead of print in the journal Infection and Immunity . Continue reading

Influenza A potentiates pneumococcal co-infection: New details emerge

Influenza A potentiates pneumococcal co-infection: New details emerge

Influenza infection can enhance the ability of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause ear and throat infections, according to research published ahead of print in the journal Infection and Immunity . Continue reading

Nurse survey shows longer working hours impact on quality of care

Nurse survey shows longer working hours impact on quality of care

Results of a survey of more than 30,000 nurses across Europe show that nurses who work longer shifts and more overtime are more likely to rate the standard of care delivered on their ward as poor, give a negative rating of their hospitals safety and omit necessary patient care. Led by researchers at the University of Southampton and the National Nursing Research Unit (NNRU) at King’s College London, the RN4CAST survey of nurses in over 450 hospitals across 12 European countries, was part of an international research programme looking at links between nursing workforce issues and patient outcomes Continue reading

Food Memory: New discovery outlines how we remember taste experiences

Food Memory: New discovery outlines how we remember taste experiences

Have you ever eaten something totally new and it made you sick? Don’t give up; if you try the same food in a different place, your brain will be more “forgiving” of the new attempt Continue reading

Evidence supports deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Evidence supports deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Available research evidence supports the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who don’t respond to other treatments, concludes a review in the October issue of Neurosurgery , official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Based on evidence, two specific bilateral DBS techniques are recommended for treatment of carefully selected patients with OCD, according to a new clinical practice guideline endorsed by the CNS and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Continue reading

Immune system of newborn babies stronger than previously thought

Immune system of newborn babies stronger than previously thought

Contrary to what was previously thought, newborn immune T cells may have the ability to trigger an inflammatory response to bacteria, according to a new study led by King’s College London. Although their immune system works very differently to that of adults, babies may still be able to mount a strong immune defense, finds the study published in the journal Nature Medicine . Our immune system is made up of several different types of immune cells, including neutrophils which play an important role in the frontline defense against infection, and lymphocytes: B cells which produce antibodies, and T cells that target cells infected with viruses and microbes. Continue reading

Program predicts placement of chemical tags that control gene activity

Program predicts placement of chemical tags that control gene activity

Biochemists working at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a program that predicts the placement of chemical marks that control the activity of genes based on sequences of DNA. They describe their analysis and report results from its application to human embryonic cells in a paper published in Nature Methods online September 21. “All of our cells have the same blueprint, the same DNA, although they serve separate functions,” said John Whitaker, lead author of the report Continue reading

On/off switch for aging cells discovered by scientists

On/off switch for aging cells discovered by scientists

Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered an on-and-off “switch” in cells that may hold the key to healthy aging. This switch points to a way to encourage healthy cells to keep dividing and generating, for example, new lung or liver tissue, even in old age. In our bodies, newly divided cells constantly replenish lungs, skin, liver and other organs Continue reading

New hepatitis c medication in children to be studied

New hepatitis c medication in children to be studied

After the success of a new drug treatment in adults with hepatitis C infection, a Saint Louis University pediatric researcher is testing the safety and efficacy of the medications in children. Part of a multi-center clinical study, SLU is the only center in the region that will examine a combination of two drugs — Sofosbuvir and Ribavirin — in children between ages 3 and 17 Continue reading

New cancer drug target involving lipid chemical messengers

New cancer drug target involving lipid chemical messengers

More than half of human cancers have abnormally upregulated chemical signals related to lipid metabolism, yet how these signals are controlled during tumor formation is not fully understood. Youhai Chen, PhD, MD, and Svetlana Fayngerts, PhD, both researchers in the department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues report that TIPE3, a newly described oncogenic protein, promotes cancer by targeting these pathways. Lipid second messengers play cardinal roles in relaying and amplifying signals from outside the cell to its interior and outer membrane Continue reading