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Better way to track emerging cell therapies using MRIs

Better way to track emerging cell therapies using MRIs

Cellular therapeutics — using intact cells to treat and cure disease — is a hugely promising new approach in medicine but it is hindered by the inability of doctors and scientists to effectively track the movements, destination and persistence of these cells in patients without resorting to invasive procedures, like tissue sampling. Continue reading

Domestic violence likely more frequent for same-sex couples

Domestic violence likely more frequent for same-sex couples

Domestic violence occurs at least as frequently, and likely even more so, between same-sex couples compared to opposite-sex couples, according to a review of literature by Northwestern Medicine® scientists. Previous studies, when analyzed together, indicate that domestic violence affects 25 percent to 75 percent of lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals. However, a lack of representative data and underreporting of abuse paints an incomplete picture of the true landscape, suggesting even higher rates. Continue reading

Pathway that contributes to Alzheimer’s disease revealed by research

Pathway that contributes to Alzheimer’s disease revealed by research

Researchers at Jacksonville’s campus of Mayo Clinic have discovered a defect in a key cell-signaling pathway they say contributes to both overproduction of toxic protein in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients as well as loss of communication between neurons — both significant contributors to this type of dementia. Their study, in the online issue of Neuron , offers the potential that targeting this specific defect with drugs “may rejuvenate or rescue this pathway,” says the study’s lead investigator, Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. “This defect is likely not the sole contributor to development of Alzheimer’s disease, but our findings suggest it is very important, and could be therapeutically targeted to possibly prevent Alzheimer’s or treat early disease,” he says. Continue reading

Gene responsible for traits involved in diabetes discovered

Gene responsible for traits involved in diabetes discovered

A collaborative research team led by Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) scientists has identified a new gene associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in rats, mice and in humans. The findings are published in the September issue of Genetics Continue reading

The effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on acute hormonal reponses to resistance exercise in men

The effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on acute hormonal reponses to resistance exercise in men

With protein supplement use by athletes on the rise, a group of researchers expanded upon prior research examining the effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and cortisol responses to an acute bout of resistance exercise. Their study, “The Effects of Soy and Whey Protein Supplementation on Acute Hormonal Reponses to Resistance Exercise in Men” is the 2014 Ragus Award Winner as Best Article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition , the official publication of the American College of Nutrition Continue reading

Small, fast, and crowded: Mammal traits amplify tick-borne illness

Small, fast, and crowded: Mammal traits amplify tick-borne illness

In the U.S., some 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease annually. Thousands also suffer from babesiosis and anaplasmosis, tick-borne ailments that can occur alone or as co-infections with Lyme disease Continue reading

Second look at glaucoma surgery: Anti-inflammatory medications after glaucoma laser surgery not helpful or necessary

Second look at glaucoma surgery: Anti-inflammatory medications after glaucoma laser surgery not helpful or necessary

New research led by Queen’s University professor Robert Campbell (Ophthalmology) has revealed using anti-inflammatory medications after glaucoma laser surgery is not helpful or necessary. Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness in the world and about 400,000 Canadians are afflicted with the disease, which is mainly caused by pressure within the eye being high enough to damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve is responsible for sending messages from the eye to the brain and is a vital part of vision. Continue reading

Kids eat better if their parents went to college

Kids eat better if their parents went to college

Children of college-educated parents eat more vegetables and drink less sugar, according to a new study from the University of British Columbia. But it’s still not enough, the study goes on to say, as all kids are falling short when it comes to eating healthier at school The research suggests a parent’s educational attainment, an indicator of socioeconomic status, may inform a child’s diet. The study found Vancouver school children whose parents completed some post-secondary education were 85 per cent more likely to eat vegetables during the school week than those with parents who completed high school or less. Continue reading

Professional recommendations against routine prostate cancer screening have little effect

Professional recommendations against routine prostate cancer screening have little effect

The effect of guidelines recommending that elderly men should not be routinely screened for prostate cancer “has been minimal at best,” according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. The study, published as a research letter online in JAMA Internal Medicine , focused on the use of PSA — prostate-specific antigen — to test for prostate cancer. Continue reading

Identifying teen alcohol and drug abuse

Identifying teen alcohol and drug abuse

The number of teens who abuse tobacco, alcohol, drugs and other substances hasn’t changed much in the past couple of decades — but for those who are prone to addiction for one reason or another, the menu of substances to choose from is larger than ever. Continue reading