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Population of neutrophils in body found by researchers

Population of neutrophils in body found by researchers

Case Western Reserve University researchers have discovered a novel population of neutrophils, which are the body’s infection control workhorses. These cells have an enhanced microbial killing ability and are thereby better able to control infection. Continue reading

Path to safer drugs for heart disease, cancer found by researchers

Path to safer drugs for heart disease, cancer found by researchers

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators may have found a way to solve a problem that has plagued a group of drugs called ligand-mimicking integrin inhibitors, which have the potential to treat conditions ranging from heart attacks to cancer metastasis. In a Nature Structural & Molecular Biology paper receiving advance online publication, the researchers provide a structural basis for the design of new and safer integrin inhibitors. Integrins are receptor proteins found on the surface of cells that determine whether or not cells adhere to adjacent cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix Continue reading

Salivary biomarkers of gingivitis: Information important for personalized decision-making

Salivary biomarkers of gingivitis: Information important for personalized decision-making

Today during the 43rd Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research, Craig Miller, University of Kentucky, Lexington, will present research titled “Salivary Biomarkers of Gingivitis: Information Important for Personalized Decision-Making.” Salivary biomarkers have been studied to help determine the presence, risk, and progression of periodontal disease. Continue reading

Stem cell study finds source of earliest blood cells during development

Stem cell study finds source of earliest blood cells during development

Hematopoietic stem cells are now routinely used to treat patients with cancers and other disorders of the blood and immune systems, but researchers knew little about the progenitor cells that give rise to them during embryonic development. In a study published April 8 in Stem Cell Reports , Matthew Inlay of the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, and faculty member of the Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, and Stanford University colleagues created novel cell assays that identified the earliest arising HSC precursors based on their ability to generate all major blood cell types (red blood cells, platelets and immune cells). This discovery of very early differentiating blood cells, Inlay said, may be very beneficial for the creation of HSC lines for clinical treatments Continue reading

Preterm children at increased risk of having math problems

Preterm children at increased risk of having math problems

Researchers have found that preterm children are at an increased risk of having general cognitive and mathematic problems. The new study by the University of Warwick and Ruhr-University Bochum, published in the Journal of Pediatrics , sought to understand the relationship between preterm birth and dyscalculia. Dyscalculia, a learning disorder which involves frequent problems with everyday arithmetic tasks, is diagnosed when children do worse in maths than would be expected based on their general intelligence Continue reading

Childhood abuse may impair weight-regulating hormones

Childhood abuse may impair weight-regulating hormones

Childhood abuse or neglect can lead to long-term hormone impairment that raises the risk of developing obesity, diabetes or other metabolic disorders in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism ( JCEM ). The study examined levels of the weight-regulating hormones leptin, adiponectin and irisin in the blood of adults who endured physical, emotional or sexual abuse or neglect as children. Continue reading

Braking system for immune responses

Braking system for immune responses

For the first time, researchers have identified a receptor on human cells that specifically recognizes crystals. It is found on immune cells and binds uric acid crystals, which trigger gout but also control immune responses. The team, led by researchers from Technische Universität München (TUM)’s Klinikum rechts der Isar hospital have published their findings in the Immunity journal. Continue reading

As age-friendly technologies emerge, experts recommend policy changes

As age-friendly technologies emerge, experts recommend policy changes

From smart phones to smart cars, both public and private entities must consider the needs of older adults in order to help them optimize the use of new technologies, according to the latest issue of Public Policy & Aging Report ( PP&AR ), titled “Aging and Technology: The Promise and the Paradox.” A total of eight articles all from authors affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab are featured. Continue reading

Increased risk of relapse omitting radiotherapy in early PET scan negative Hodgkin lymphoma

Increased risk of relapse omitting radiotherapy in early PET scan negative Hodgkin lymphoma

Interim analysis of the intergroup EORTC-LYSA-FIL 20051 H10 trial published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology i ndicates an increased risk of early relapse when omitting radiotherapy in early PET scan negative patients with stage I/II Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Early outcome, however, was excellent in both arms, and the final analysis should reveal whether these initial findings are maintained over time. Continue reading

Increased risk of relapse omitting radiotherapy in early PET scan negative Hodgkin lymphoma

Increased risk of relapse omitting radiotherapy in early PET scan negative Hodgkin lymphoma

Interim analysis of the intergroup EORTC-LYSA-FIL 20051 H10 trial published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology i ndicates an increased risk of early relapse when omitting radiotherapy in early PET scan negative patients with stage I/II Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Early outcome, however, was excellent in both arms, and the final analysis should reveal whether these initial findings are maintained over time. Continue reading