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Mediterranean diet has varied effects on cognitive decline among different races, study shows

Mediterranean diet has varied effects on cognitive decline among different races, study shows

While the Mediterranean diet may have broad health benefits, its impact on cognitive decline differs among race-specific populations, according to a new study published in the Journal of Gerontology . The team of researchers, including Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU Prof. Danit R Continue reading

SIDS risks vary by infant age: Bed sharing remains greatest risk factor for sleep related infant deaths

SIDS risks vary by infant age: Bed sharing remains greatest risk factor for sleep related infant deaths

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related causes of infant mortality have several known risk factors, but little is known if these factors change for different age groups. In a new study in the August 2014 Pediatrics, “Sleep Environment Risks for Younger and Older Infants,” published online July 14, researchers studied sleep-related infant deaths from 24 states from 2004-2012 in the case reporting system of the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths Continue reading

Bothered by hot flashes? Acupuncture might be the answer, analysis suggests

Bothered by hot flashes? Acupuncture might be the answer, analysis suggests

In the 2,500+ years that have passed since acupuncture was first used by the ancient Chinese, it has been used to treat a number of physical, mental and emotional conditions including nausea and vomiting, stroke rehabilitation, headaches, menstrual cramps, asthma, carpal tunnel, fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis, to name just a few. Now, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials which is being published this month in Menopause , the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), indicates that acupuncture can affect the severity and frequency of hot flashes for women in natural menopause Continue reading

Stem cell scientists lay TRAP for disease

Stem cell scientists lay TRAP for disease

USC Stem Cell scientists have set a “mouse TRAP” to capture the early signs of kidney failure, as described by a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation . Their new transgenic mouse line uses a technique called TRAP to extract cellular and genetic information from a variety of solid organs. Invented by scientists at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in 2008, TRAP involves attaching a fluorescent tag to the protein-making machinery, or ribosomes, of the cell type of interest Continue reading

When good gut bacteria get sick

When good gut bacteria get sick

Being sick due to an infection can make us feel lousy. But what must the ecosystem of bacteria, or microbiota, colonizing our guts be going through when hit with infection? A study from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) has utilized unique computational models to show how infection can affect bacteria that naturally live in our intestines. Continue reading

Text message medicine: Texts from the ER can reduce binge drinking

Text message medicine: Texts from the ER can reduce binge drinking

Young adults who screened positive for a history of hazardous or binge drinking reduced their binge drinking by more than 50 percent after receiving mobile phone text messages following a visit to the emergency department, according to a study published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine. “Each day in the U.S., more than 50,000 adults ages 18 to 24 visit ERs and up to half have hazardous alcohol use patterns,” said Brian Suffoletto, MD, of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Pittsburgh, Pa. Continue reading

New metastasis-suppressor gene identified by cancer researchers

New metastasis-suppressor gene identified by cancer researchers

Among patients with deadly cancers, more than 90 percent die because of metastatic spread of their disease. Looking to target a key pathway in order to interfere with the processes that lead to tumor spread, a research team led by Irwin H. Gelman, Ph.D., of Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) has identified a new suppressor of cancer metastasis that may point the way toward development of more effective treatments for prostate cancers and other malignant solid tumors. Continue reading

Exercise is the best medicine, study shows

Exercise is the best medicine, study shows

Women would benefit from being prescribed exercise as medicine, according to a QUT study that revealed moderate to high intensity activity is essential to reducing the risk of death in older women. Continue reading

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the largest professional association of neurologists and a leading authority on sports concussion, is releasing a new position paper that states doctors have an ethical obligation to educate and protect athletes from sports concussion and clear them to play only when the athlete is medically ready, standing firm against objections from players, parents or coaches. The statement is published in the July 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the AAN, and is being released ahead of The Sports Concussion Conference, July 11-13, 2014, in Chicago, where the AAN will share the latest scientific advances in diagnosing and treating sports concussion. The AAN position statement calls for doctors to safeguard the future mental and physical health of athletes as a top priority, especially regarding return-to-play decision-making. Continue reading

Removing gall bladder for suspected common duct stone shows benefit

Removing gall bladder for suspected common duct stone shows benefit

Among patients with possible common duct stones, removal of the gall bladder, compared with endoscopic assessment of the common duct followed by gall bladder removal, resulted in a shorter length of hospital stay without increased illness and fewer common duct examinations, according to a study in the July 9 issue of JAMA . Continue reading