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Tag Archives: Technology

Tiny power generator runs on spit

Tiny power generator runs on spit

Saliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy sufficient to run on-chip applications, according to an international team of engineers. Bruce E. Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn State, credited the idea to fellow researcher Justine E. Continue reading

Light-activated antimicrobial surface that also works in the dark: World’s first

Light-activated antimicrobial surface that also works in the dark: World’s first

Researchers at UCL have developed a new antibacterial material which has potential for cutting hospital acquired infections. The combination of two simple dyes with nanoscopic particles of gold is deadly to bacteria when activated by light — even under modest indoor lighting. Continue reading

Light-activated antimicrobial surface that also works in the dark: World’s first

Light-activated antimicrobial surface that also works in the dark: World’s first

Researchers at UCL have developed a new antibacterial material which has potential for cutting hospital acquired infections. The combination of two simple dyes with nanoscopic particles of gold is deadly to bacteria when activated by light — even under modest indoor lighting. And in a first for this type of substance, it also shows impressive antibacterial properties in total darkness. Continue reading

Microfluidic device with artificial arteries measures drugs’ influence on blood clotting

Microfluidic device with artificial arteries measures drugs’ influence on blood clotting

A new microfluidic method for evaluating drugs commonly used for preventing heart attacks has found that while aspirin can prevent dangerous blood clots in some at-risk patients, it may not be effective in all patients with narrowed arteries. The study, which involved 14 human subjects, used a device that simulated blood flowing through narrowed coronary arteries to assess effects of anti-clotting drugs. Continue reading

Pathogens in cheese: Case study on Austrian curd cheese

Pathogens in cheese: Case study on Austrian curd cheese

If food products are not produced in a hygienic environment, consumers can face the threat of dangerous pathogens. This is exactly what happened in 2009 and 2010 when two different strains of Listeria monocytogenes were found in the traditional Austrian curd cheese known as “Quargel.” 34 people were infected, and a total of 8 patients died. Continue reading

As age-friendly technologies emerge, experts recommend policy changes

As age-friendly technologies emerge, experts recommend policy changes

From smart phones to smart cars, both public and private entities must consider the needs of older adults in order to help them optimize the use of new technologies, according to the latest issue of Public Policy & Aging Report ( PP&AR ), titled “Aging and Technology: The Promise and the Paradox.” A total of eight articles all from authors affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab are featured. Continue reading

Video-game device with goal of preventing patient falls

Video-game device with goal of preventing patient falls

Technology used in video games is making its way to hospital rooms, where researchers at the University of Missouri hope to learn new ways to prevent falls among hospital patients. Continue reading

Blood test identifies brain damage from concussion in ice hockey

Blood test identifies brain damage from concussion in ice hockey

Half way into last year’s season, 35 of 288 players in the Swedish Hockey League had already had a concussion. Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy, who surveyed all of the players in the league’s 12 clubs, have now developed a method that can show just an hour after the injury how severe the concussion is, if there is a risk of long-term symptoms and about when the player can return to the game. Between September and December of the 2012/2013 season alone, 35 of 288 players in the Swedish Hockey League (SHL) had had a concussion — in three cases, it was so severe that the player was knocked unconscious Continue reading

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

Scientists from the UK and Australia have created a mouse that expresses a fluorescing ‘biosensor’ in every cell of its body, allowing diseased cells and drugs to be tracked and evaluated in real time and in three dimensions. This biosensor mimics the action of a target molecule, in this case a protein known as ‘Rac’, which drives cell movement in many types of cancer. Rac behaves like a switch, oscillating on the molecular level between two states — active or inactive Continue reading

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

Scientists from the UK and Australia have created a mouse that expresses a fluorescing ‘biosensor’ in every cell of its body, allowing diseased cells and drugs to be tracked and evaluated in real time and in three dimensions. Continue reading