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Tag Archives: Technology

Pathogens in cheese: Case study on Austrian curd cheese

Pathogens in cheese: Case study on Austrian curd cheese

If food products are not produced in a hygienic environment, consumers can face the threat of dangerous pathogens. This is exactly what happened in 2009 and 2010 when two different strains of Listeria monocytogenes were found in the traditional Austrian curd cheese known as “Quargel.” 34 people were infected, and a total of 8 patients died. Continue reading

As age-friendly technologies emerge, experts recommend policy changes

As age-friendly technologies emerge, experts recommend policy changes

From smart phones to smart cars, both public and private entities must consider the needs of older adults in order to help them optimize the use of new technologies, according to the latest issue of Public Policy & Aging Report ( PP&AR ), titled “Aging and Technology: The Promise and the Paradox.” A total of eight articles all from authors affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab are featured. Continue reading

Video-game device with goal of preventing patient falls

Video-game device with goal of preventing patient falls

Technology used in video games is making its way to hospital rooms, where researchers at the University of Missouri hope to learn new ways to prevent falls among hospital patients. Continue reading

Blood test identifies brain damage from concussion in ice hockey

Blood test identifies brain damage from concussion in ice hockey

Half way into last year’s season, 35 of 288 players in the Swedish Hockey League had already had a concussion. Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy, who surveyed all of the players in the league’s 12 clubs, have now developed a method that can show just an hour after the injury how severe the concussion is, if there is a risk of long-term symptoms and about when the player can return to the game. Between September and December of the 2012/2013 season alone, 35 of 288 players in the Swedish Hockey League (SHL) had had a concussion — in three cases, it was so severe that the player was knocked unconscious Continue reading

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

Scientists from the UK and Australia have created a mouse that expresses a fluorescing ‘biosensor’ in every cell of its body, allowing diseased cells and drugs to be tracked and evaluated in real time and in three dimensions. This biosensor mimics the action of a target molecule, in this case a protein known as ‘Rac’, which drives cell movement in many types of cancer. Rac behaves like a switch, oscillating on the molecular level between two states — active or inactive Continue reading

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

‘Fluorescent’ mouse can teach us about many diseases, drugs

Scientists from the UK and Australia have created a mouse that expresses a fluorescing ‘biosensor’ in every cell of its body, allowing diseased cells and drugs to be tracked and evaluated in real time and in three dimensions. Continue reading

Cancer stem cells destroyed with cryoablation and nanoparticle-encapsulated anticancer drug

Cancer stem cells destroyed with cryoablation and nanoparticle-encapsulated anticancer drug

Combining nanodrug-based chemotherapy and cryoablation provides an effective strategy to eliminate cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) — the root of cancer resistance and metastasis, which will help to improve the safety and efficacy of treating malignancies that are refractory to conventional therapies. Cryoablation (also called cryosurgery or cryotherapy) is an energy-based, minimally invasive surgical technique that has been investigated to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, which is done by freezing the diseased tissue to subzero temperature to induce irreversible damage. It is particularly attractive for fighting against breast cancer due to its excellent cosmetic outcome to preserve the organ with unnoticeable scar formation on skin Continue reading

Cancer stem cells destroyed with cryoablation and nanoparticle-encapsulated anticancer drug

Cancer stem cells destroyed with cryoablation and nanoparticle-encapsulated anticancer drug

Combining nanodrug-based chemotherapy and cryoablation provides an effective strategy to eliminate cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) — the root of cancer resistance and metastasis, which will help to improve the safety and efficacy of treating malignancies that are refractory to conventional therapies. Cryoablation (also called cryosurgery or cryotherapy) is an energy-based, minimally invasive surgical technique that has been investigated to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, which is done by freezing the diseased tissue to subzero temperature to induce irreversible damage. It is particularly attractive for fighting against breast cancer due to its excellent cosmetic outcome to preserve the organ with unnoticeable scar formation on skin Continue reading

Scientists ‘herd’ cells in new approach to tissue engineering

Scientists ‘herd’ cells in new approach to tissue engineering

Sometimes it only takes a quick jolt of electricity to get a swarm of cells moving in the right direction. Researchers at UC Berkeley found that an electrical current can be used to orchestrate the flow of a group of cells, an achievement that could establish the basis for more controlled forms of tissue engineering and for potential applications such as “smart bandages” that use electrical stimulation to help heal wounds. In the experiments, described in a study published this week in the journal Nature Materials , the researchers used single layers of epithelial cells, the type of cells that bind together to form robust sheathes in skin, kidneys, cornea and other organs. Continue reading

Free online software helps speed up genetic discoveries

Free online software helps speed up genetic discoveries

Microarray analysis — a complex technology commonly used in many applications such as discovering genes, disease diagnosis, drug development and toxicological research — has just become easier and more user-friendly. A new advanced software program called Eureka-DMA provides a cost-free, graphical interface that allows bioinformaticians and bench-biologists alike to initiate analyses, and to investigate the data produced by microarrays. Continue reading