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Professional recommendations against routine prostate cancer screening have little effect

Professional recommendations against routine prostate cancer screening have little effect

The effect of guidelines recommending that elderly men should not be routinely screened for prostate cancer “has been minimal at best,” according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. The study, published as a research letter online in JAMA Internal Medicine , focused on the use of PSA — prostate-specific antigen — to test for prostate cancer. Continue reading

Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning

Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning

Men with prostate cancer may one day be able to predict when and how much various treatments will impact their urinary and sexual functioning, thanks in part to new findings that researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s 56th Annual Meeting on Tuesday, September 16. Looking over data gathered from more than 17,000 surveys completed by men diagnosed with prostate cancer, Fox Chase researchers tracked when patients’ urinary and sexual symptoms changed following each type of treatment, and by how much. “The ultimate goal,” says study author Matthew Johnson, MD, Resident Physician in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Fox Chase, “is to develop a predictive tool that lets patients decide which treatment is right for them based on the symptoms they have beforehand, and their tolerance for any change — even temporary — in those symptoms.” After a diagnosis of prostate cancer, men have multiple treatment options, including surgery to remove the prostate and several types of radiation therapy Continue reading

Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning

Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning

Men with prostate cancer may one day be able to predict when and how much various treatments will impact their urinary and sexual functioning, thanks in part to new findings that researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s 56th Annual Meeting on Tuesday, September 16. Looking over data gathered from more than 17,000 surveys completed by men diagnosed with prostate cancer, Fox Chase researchers tracked when patients’ urinary and sexual symptoms changed following each type of treatment, and by how much. “The ultimate goal,” says study author Matthew Johnson, MD, Resident Physician in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Fox Chase, “is to develop a predictive tool that lets patients decide which treatment is right for them based on the symptoms they have beforehand, and their tolerance for any change — even temporary — in those symptoms.” After a diagnosis of prostate cancer, men have multiple treatment options, including surgery to remove the prostate and several types of radiation therapy Continue reading

Dental, nutrition experts call for radical rethink on free sugars intake

Dental, nutrition experts call for radical rethink on free sugars intake

Sugars in the diet should make up no more than 3% of total energy intake to reduce the significant financial and social burdens of tooth decay, finds new research from UCL (University College London) and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. The study, published in the open-access journal BMC Public Health , analysed the effect of sugars on dental caries, also known as tooth decay. Continue reading

Certain form of baldness at age 45 linked to higher risk for aggressive prostate cancer

Certain form of baldness at age 45 linked to higher risk for aggressive prostate cancer

A new, large cohort analysis from the prospective Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, indicates that men who had moderate baldness affecting both the front and the crown of their head at age 45 were at a 40% increased risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer (usually indicates a faster growing tumor resulting in poorer prognosis relative to non-aggressive prostate cancer) later in life, compared to men with no baldness. Continue reading

Certain form of baldness at age 45 linked to higher risk for aggressive prostate cancer

Certain form of baldness at age 45 linked to higher risk for aggressive prostate cancer

A new, large cohort analysis from the prospective Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, indicates that men who had moderate baldness affecting both the front and the crown of their head at age 45 were at a 40% increased risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer (usually indicates a faster growing tumor resulting in poorer prognosis relative to non-aggressive prostate cancer) later in life, compared to men with no baldness. Continue reading

Molecular mechanisms of birth defects among older women: Why older women can have babies with Down Syndrome

Molecular mechanisms of birth defects among older women: Why older women can have babies with Down Syndrome

Dartmouth researchers studying cell division in fruit flies have discovered a pathway that may improve understanding of molecular mistakes that cause older women to have babies with Down syndrome. The study shows for the first time that new protein linkages occur in immature egg cells after DNA replication and that these replacement linkages are essential for these cells to maintain meiotic cohesion for long periods Continue reading

Mosquito fact and fiction

Mosquito fact and fiction

One of Jason Pitts’ favorite stories is about mosquitoes and their strange attraction to Limburger cheese. Pitts is a research assistant professor of biological sciences and a key member of a research team at Vanderbilt University that is attempting to combat malaria and other mosquito-borne illnesses by developing new and improved attractants and repellants. In his spare time, he collects interesting facts and stories about his research subjects, nature’s ultimate bioterrorists. Continue reading

Too many kids with asthma, food allergies lack school emergency plans

Too many kids with asthma, food allergies lack school emergency plans

Only one in four students with asthma and half of children with food allergies have emergency health management plans in place at school, leaving schools inadequately prepared to manage daily needs and handle medical emergencies related to often life-threatening medical conditions, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study in partnership with Chicago Public Schools (CPS). “Given the amount of time kids spend in school, it’s critical for school staff, clinicians and parents to make sure there’s a health management plan in place for students with health conditions,” said Northwestern Medicine pediatrician Ruchi Gupta, M.D., lead author of the study. “Not having a health management plan leaves students without a vital safety net during the school day. Continue reading

Insights into severe form of dwarfism

Insights into severe form of dwarfism

A better understanding of the pathology of a severe form of dwarfism as well as a possible window of treatment have been discovered by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The preclinical research was published in a recent issue of the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research Continue reading