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Tag Archives: Time

Robot caregivers help the elderly

Robot caregivers help the elderly

Our life expectancy lengthens and members of the ‘silver generation’ make up an ever-larger proportion of the population. Can technologies help us in caring for ourselves, our older relatives and friends? Could we learn to live together with robots while being watched over by sensors? Continue reading

Infusion of young blood recharges brains of old mice

Infusion of young blood recharges brains of old mice

Something — or some things — in the blood of young mice has the ability to restore mental capabilities in old mice, a new study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators has found. If the same goes for humans, it could spell a new paradigm for recharging our aging brains, and it might mean new therapeutic approaches for treating dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease. Continue reading

Alcohol use before pregnancy linked to intestinal birth defect

Alcohol use before pregnancy linked to intestinal birth defect

Women should refrain from drinking alcohol before they try to become pregnant, according to maternal-fetal medicine specialists at Loyola University Health System. Continue reading

For an immune cell, microgravity mimics aging

For an immune cell, microgravity mimics aging

Telling someone to “act your age” is another way of asking him or her to behave better. Age, however, does not always bring improvements. Certain cells of the immune system tend to misbehave with age, leaving the elderly more vulnerable to illness Continue reading

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Everything we do — all of our movements, thoughts and feelings — are the result of neurons talking with one another, and recent studies have suggested that some of the conversations might not be all that private. Brain cells known as astrocytes may be listening in on, or even participating in, some of those discussions. Continue reading

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Everything we do — all of our movements, thoughts and feelings — are the result of neurons talking with one another, and recent studies have suggested that some of the conversations might not be all that private. Brain cells known as astrocytes may be listening in on, or even participating in, some of those discussions. But a new mouse study suggests that astrocytes might only be tuning in part of the time — specifically, when the neurons get really excited about something. Continue reading

Using video surveillance to measure peoples’ hand washing habits

Using video surveillance to measure peoples’ hand washing habits

One of the best defenses against infectious disease is one of the most simple — hand washing. Still, despite years of global public awareness campaigns, hand washing rates remain low. Continue reading

Using video surveillance to measure peoples’ hand washing habits

Using video surveillance to measure peoples’ hand washing habits

One of the best defenses against infectious disease is one of the most simple — hand washing. Continue reading

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it’s normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition. The researchers from the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Health System offer the first long-term study of bleeding patterns in women of multiple race/ethnicities who were going through menopause Continue reading

Lashing out at your spouse? Check your blood sugar

Lashing out at your spouse? Check your blood sugar

Lower levels of blood sugar may make married people angrier at their spouses and even more likely to lash out aggressively, new research reveals. In a 21-day study, researchers found that levels of blood glucose in married people, measured each night, predicted how angry they would be with their spouse that evening. At the end of the 21 days, people who had generally lower levels of glucose were willing to blast their spouses with unpleasant noises at a higher volume and for a longer time than those who had higher glucose levels Continue reading