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Tag Archives: Time

Lifelong premature ejaculation can be treated by pelvic floor exercises

Lifelong premature ejaculation can be treated by pelvic floor exercises

A trial presented at the European Congress of Urology in Stockholm reports for the first time that pelvic floor exercises can be effective in treating premature ejaculation in men who have had lifelong problems. Premature Ejaculation (PE) affects a significant minority of men at some point in their lives. Continue reading

Hepatitis C treatment cures over 90 percent of patients with cirrhosis

Hepatitis C treatment cures over 90 percent of patients with cirrhosis

Twelve weeks of an investigational oral therapy cured hepatitis C infection in more than 90 percent of patients with liver cirrhosis and was well tolerated by these patients, according to an international study that included researchers from UT Medicine San Antonio and the Texas Liver Institute. Historically, hepatitis C cure rates in patients with cirrhosis (liver scarring) have been lower than 50 percent and the treatment was not safe for many of these patients Continue reading

Scientists report success growing cartilage to reconstruct nostrils and implanting tissue-engineered vaginal organs into humans

Scientists report success growing cartilage to reconstruct nostrils and implanting tissue-engineered vaginal organs into humans

Two new articles published in The Lancet report the first ever successful operations in humans to reconstruct the alar wings of the nose (nostrils) (Martin et al ), and to implant tissue-engineered vaginal organs in women with a rare syndrome that causes the vagina to be underdeveloped or absent (Atala et al ), in both cases using the patients’ own tissue. In one paper, led by Professor Ivan Martin from the University of Basel in Switzerland, scientists report having engineered a human cartilage graft from patients’ own nasal septum cartilage cells to successfully rebuild the nostrils (alar lobule) of five individuals whose noses were damaged by skin cancer Continue reading

Scientists report success growing cartilage to reconstruct nostrils and implanting tissue-engineered vaginal organs into humans

Scientists report success growing cartilage to reconstruct nostrils and implanting tissue-engineered vaginal organs into humans

Two new articles published in The Lancet report the first ever successful operations in humans to reconstruct the alar wings of the nose (nostrils) (Martin et al ), and to implant tissue-engineered vaginal organs in women with a rare syndrome that causes the vagina to be underdeveloped or absent (Atala et al ), in both cases using the patients’ own tissue. In one paper, led by Professor Ivan Martin from the University of Basel in Switzerland, scientists report having engineered a human cartilage graft from patients’ own nasal septum cartilage cells to successfully rebuild the nostrils (alar lobule) of five individuals whose noses were damaged by skin cancer Continue reading

Laboratory-grown vaginas implanted in patients

Laboratory-grown vaginas implanted in patients

Scientists reported today the first human recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs. A research team led by Anthony Atala, M.D., director of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine, describes in the Lancet long-term success in four teenage girls who received vaginal organs that were engineered with their own cells. “This pilot study is the first to demonstrate that vaginal organs can be constructed in the lab and used successfully in humans,” said Atala. Continue reading

Laboratory-grown vaginas implanted in patients

Laboratory-grown vaginas implanted in patients

Scientists reported today the first human recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs. A research team led by Anthony Atala, M.D., director of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine, describes in the Lancet long-term success in four teenage girls who received vaginal organs that were engineered with their own cells. “This pilot study is the first to demonstrate that vaginal organs can be constructed in the lab and used successfully in humans,” said Atala. Continue reading

Online registry to drive brain disease research

Online registry to drive brain disease research

A new online project led by researchers at UC San Francisco promises to dramatically cut the time and cost of conducting clinical trials for brain diseases, while also helping scientists analyze and track the brain functions of thousands of volunteers over time. With easy online registration, the Brain Health Registry is designed to create a ready pool of research subjects for studies on neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and many other brain ailments. Continue reading

Hybrid technology could make Star Trek-style tricorder a reality

Hybrid technology could make Star Trek-style tricorder a reality

Scientists at the University of Southampton are aiming to develop a handheld testing device to provide same day diagnosis from a patient’s bedside. In the fictional Star-Trek universe, the tricorder was used to remotely scan patients for a diagnosis Continue reading

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. The participants, each of whom had been paralyzed for more than two years, were able to voluntarily flex their toes, ankles, and knees while the stimulator was active, and the movements were enhanced over time when combined with physical rehabilitation. Researchers involved in the study say the therapy has the potential to change the prognosis of people with paralysis even years after injury. Continue reading

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Patients with paraplegia regain voluntary movement after spinal stimulation

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. Continue reading